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Correct way to pronounce the word LEGO

NateP1980NateP1980 Member Posts: 7
edited April 2012 in Everything else LEGO
Can someone please tell me the correct way to say the word LEGO?
I grew up saying "Leg-Oh" but lately I've been hearing it said as "Lay-Go". These could just be regional variations of the same word (I grew up in Victoria, Australia but am now living in South Australia) so I would also like to know of any others and if some are more correct than others.
Thanks

Comments

  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 20,028
    As long as you don't say "legos", you are OK in my book.
  • HuwHuw Brickset Towers, Hampshire, UKAdministrator Posts: 6,964
    Leg-oh in the UK. In Denmark I think they say it more like Lee-go.
  • andheandhe UKMember Posts: 3,543
    Surely this is an accent thing? I got mocked by my friends for calling IKEA: Ick-eah, which I believe is the Swedish pronounciation rather than the more common english Eye-key-ah.
    So Leg-oh in the UK, Lay-go in the US, Lee-go in Denmark etc (but as CCC said, just not "legos" :P)
  • DuchessaDuchessa Member Posts: 287
    It's difficult to explain the pronounciation of scandinavian words, but I'd say that Huw is on the right path. The wovel E i danish is pronounced the same way as E in the brittish english word "hear". (Maybe a bad example, but I couldn't think of another one right now).
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 20,028
    I don't think it matters how the Danish say it, if you are speaking English.

    How many people say "I am going to Paris", and use the French pronunciation of Paris, rather than the English? You often sound a fool if you try to use a different pronunciation of a word when speaking English (or indeed, any Language).
  • AvengerDrAvengerDr Member Posts: 453
    Phonetically, in italian it would be /le'go/ .. (I guess)
    which I guess it's similar to how it is pronounced in english - at least they never had any problem in understanding me :D
  • RedbullgivesuwindRedbullgivesuwind Brickset's Secret HeadquatersMember Posts: 2,013
    I think as long as you don't call it megabloks it doesnt really matter. Although it is interesting to see how it is pronounced in other countries and the diversity of language. Even though its a worldwide brand.
  • DuchessaDuchessa Member Posts: 287
    I don't think it matters how the Danish say it, if you are speaking English.

    How many people say "I am going to Paris", and use the French pronunciation of Paris, rather than the English? You often sound a fool if you try to use a different pronunciation of a word when speaking English (or indeed, any Language).
    I do speak english, but my native languge is swedish. And yes, I think that a lot of people here try to pronounce names and titels in their respective language, as far as it's possible. As an example, I've actually never heard anyone here speak of Champs-Élysées with english or swedish pronounciation. They say it in french.

    A very speculative guess is that those of us who speak a smaller language usually learn one or two (or more) other languages, which gives you a higher awareness of other ways to pronounce names/places/things.
  • RedbullgivesuwindRedbullgivesuwind Brickset's Secret HeadquatersMember Posts: 2,013
    ^Aside from a few people I think its interesting that very few english people speak a second language at all. But most places as your experience shows learn English as another language. I think it may be that it depends on how widely your language is spoken that effects what you learn.
  • andyscouseandyscouse Western MAMember Posts: 365
    Remember also - the plural of Lego is Lego. The plural of Lego brick is Lego bricks (as @CCC infers!).
  • LostInTranslationLostInTranslation UKMember Posts: 5,594
    ^Oh, I could really go off on one here, but I will resist... Unfortunately, you're right, many native English-speakers do not feel the need to learn any other languages :-(

    I don't think the pronunciation of Lego matters either way, the brick is a universal language :-)
  • DuchessaDuchessa Member Posts: 287
    I agree that the most important thing isn't how you pronounce Lego - it's how many sets you accumulate :)

    But I think that languages and culture are intersting, so this kind of questions always make me eager to discuss.
  • LostInTranslationLostInTranslation UKMember Posts: 5,594
    Oh I want to discuss as well, but I already have such a bad reputation round here for going off-topic that I feel I have to at least initially pretend to exercise restraint :-P
  • AvengerDrAvengerDr Member Posts: 453
    The pronounciation of Lego matters! If Lego was spelt with a "th" sound in it I guess I'd never have been able to become such a fan of it, because it would have been nigh to impossible for me to pronounce correctly :D - not being a native speaker...

    damn barbaric sounds.... :D
  • DuchessaDuchessa Member Posts: 287
    Danish, norwegian and swedish are quite similar languages. I can understand people from Denmark and Norway, and they understand me. But seriously: I speak english quite fluently and I can speak a little bit of french. However, speaking danish is one of the hardest things I could imagine. Their pronounciation is really hard to understand and mimic, if you're not a native dane. So yes, I understand danish, but english and french are much easier languages.

    The words "Leg godt" (that later became "Lego") are a good example of this. The word "godt" is really tricky. I wish I could find a sound clip of a dane pronouncing it....
  • RedbullgivesuwindRedbullgivesuwind Brickset's Secret HeadquatersMember Posts: 2,013
    @Lostintranslation thats why I said a few I was refering to you and a couple of my mates who speak more than one language.

    Im with @Duchessa its how many sets you have :-)
  • UKtsumiUKtsumi Member Posts: 627
    The Japanese dont have a "L" .. there it's more like "raye - go"
  • LostInTranslationLostInTranslation UKMember Posts: 5,594
    @redbullgivesuwind - Just to clarify - when I said I could go off on one, I meant in general, not at you in particular :)
  • PlaugePlauge Member Posts: 39
    Danish, norwegian and swedish are quite similar languages. I can understand people from Denmark and Norway, and they understand me. But seriously: I speak english quite fluently and I can speak a little bit of french. However, speaking danish is one of the hardest things I could imagine. Their pronounciation is really hard to understand and mimic, if you're not a native dane. So yes, I understand danish, but english and french are much easier languages.

    The words "Leg godt" (that later became "Lego") are a good example of this. The word "godt" is really tricky. I wish I could find a sound clip of a dane pronouncing it....
    I mostly agree, but the danes "can" be a bit difficut to understand :D
  • RedbullgivesuwindRedbullgivesuwind Brickset's Secret HeadquatersMember Posts: 2,013
    @Lostintranslation I dont know your always mean to me ;-P
  • DuchessaDuchessa Member Posts: 287
    And on topic of understanding and pronouncing danish, this is worh four minutes of your life:

    It's a clip from a norwegian TV-show that makes fun of how strange danish is, even to us scandinavians. (The subtitles are norwegian). Those who speak "danish" in the clip are mixing correct danish words with nonsense, but the sounds and construction of words are surprisingly much like danish..... :)
  • brickmaticbrickmatic Member Posts: 1,071
    Remember also - the plural of Lego is Lego. The plural of Lego brick is Lego bricks (as @CCC infers!).
    No, there is no plural of LEGO since LEGO is an adjective. ;)

    Also, there is no correct way to pronounce LEGO, there are just commonly accepted ways of pronouncing LEGO that very regionally. Anyone know how it is pronounced by Danes?
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 20,028
    It is both a (collective) noun and an adjective. Although LEGO® only want you to use it as an adjective...

    http://aboutus.lego.com/en-us/legal-notice/fair-play/
  • brickmaticbrickmatic Member Posts: 1,071
    ^ Oh, if you're ignoring the TLG fair play stuff and going by what's in common usage, then in most localities the plural of lego is lego, although in some localities legos is also appropriate.
  • brickmaticbrickmatic Member Posts: 1,071
    Here is how Google Translate pronounces it in English and Danish, lol. (Just click the little speaker icons.)

    http://translate.google.com/#da|en|leg%20godt%20lego
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,296
    Back in 1955-65 you could get a Printed Brick (1x6, 1x8) parts pack with the writing in the local language...

    Danish...

    BAGER, BANEGÅRD, BANKEN, ESSO SERVICE, FALCK, GARAGE, HOTEL, KINO, KIOSK, KØBMAND, MEJERI, POST, SLAGTER, TAXA, TEATER, TOBAK, VW SALG.

    Norwegian...

    BAKER, BANKEN, DROSJ, ESSO SERVICE, GARASJE, HOTELL, KINO, KIOSK, KOLONIAL, POSTHUS, SLAKTER, TAXI, TEATER, TOBAKK, VW SALG.

    Swedish....

    ESSO SERVICE, GARAGE, HOTELL, KINO, KIOSK, POST, SPECERIER, TAXI, TEATER, TOBAK, VW FORSALJNING.

    And although it's not related to the others... Finnish....

    ESSO HUOLTO, HOTELLI, KAHVILA, KIOSKI, TAKSI, TEATTERI, TUPAKKAA, VW MYYNTI.

    ----------------

    These names make the Icelandic name of the first LEGO sales agent in Iceland seem almost common.... lol...

    Sambands íslenskra berkla- og brjóstholssjúklinga (SÍBS)


  • MatthewMatthew Cheshire, UKAdministrator Posts: 3,735
    People I've spoken to in Denmark on the phone always seem to say it Liigo, but the UK staff all say Leg oh. As others have said, as long as you don't say Legos (or liigos for that matter) you're OK in my book.
  • caperberrycaperberry LondonMember Posts: 2,226
    Don't trust how those South Australians pronounce things, @NateP1980. Victorians are correct.

    Great video, @Duchessa!
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,296
    @Duchessa I Agree, that is a funny video... the blond guy is hilarious...
  • prof1515prof1515 EarthMember Posts: 1,561
    I pronounce it Leh-go. *shrug*
  • tdhbrtdhbr Member Posts: 188
    I've always said (for 35+ years) "leg-o." My wife (not into LEGO but very tolerant) says "Lay-go." I have two sons, both very much into LEGO. The 8-year-old says it my way, the 11-year-old says it my wife's way. Figure that out.
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,296
    I have pronounced it "Leh-go" for 52 years (1960 my first set)... and I live in the American midwest. However, in Chapter 71 of my LEGO DVD (LEGO TV Commercials 1957-Present)... there are old 1962 USA Samsonite LEGO commercials that pronounce it "Lay-go".... the continental European pronunciation.
  • minifiguresseriesminifiguresseries Member Posts: 17
    edited April 2012
    I have pronouncing this as Lego only since childhood. These minifigures series are just amazing. Love it!
  • PlaugePlauge Member Posts: 39
    Um, I pretty much say it straightforward in eh.. Norwegian, letter by letter. My wife and her part of the family says it the same way (they are all Austrians). Even my 2years old daughter pronounce it the same way.

    Love that one @Duchessa there is also an follow up video, where the danish starts to learn/speak Norwegian in an attempt to understand each other.
  • LostInTranslationLostInTranslation UKMember Posts: 5,594
    @Duchessa, as a Swede perhaps you can also clarify something that has occurred to me since starting to learn your lovely language: In Star Wars in Swedish, does Darth Vader have the same name, and is it pronounced in the same way as 'väder' [weather]?
    I've been having visions of Darth Weatherman doing the forecasts.. :)
  • peterlinddkpeterlinddk DenmarkMember Posts: 170
    edited April 2012
    It is close to impossible to write how something is pronounced, especially when none of us is that experienced in phonetic transcription :)

    Here is a link to some guys review of LEGO Star Wars: - you can hear the pronounciation in the beginning, and that is kind of how we danes pronounce the word "LEGO".

    Funny detail: The words Leg Godt actually have different vowel-sounds than the word LEGO - google translate's pronounciation of Leg godt, med LEGO isn't that far off, except that it sounds somewhat electronic at the end.
  • caperberrycaperberry LondonMember Posts: 2,226
    I've been having visions of Darth Weatherman doing the forecasts.. :)
    Hahhaaa! Oh, there is a video in that! "The gale force is strong with this one."

  • LostInTranslationLostInTranslation UKMember Posts: 5,594
    ^ LOL! Yes, that's it exactly!
  • caperberrycaperberry LondonMember Posts: 2,226
    ^All in a Muppets-style Swedish chef accent but through his respirator.
  • DuchessaDuchessa Member Posts: 287
    @Duchessa, as a Swede perhaps you can also clarify something that has occurred to me since starting to learn your lovely language: In Star Wars in Swedish, does Darth Vader have the same name, and is it pronounced in the same way as 'väder' [weather]?
    I've been having visions of Darth Weatherman doing the forecasts.. :)
    Haha! :) No, actually the SW-characters have the same names here. They are also pronounced in english, since it's an english speaking movie.

    Movies aren't dubbed here, they usually have subtitles. The exception is movies for kids. They usually go up in the cinema in two parallell versions: one dubbed for really small kids, and one with subtitels for a little older kids (and parents).

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