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Unpopular LEGO Opinions

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  • daewoodaewoo DFWMember Posts: 776
    While I didn't order any of the 1x2 vibrant yellow plates like Bumblepants did, I can see lots of uses for them.  Some people just like to complain.
    rockethead26560HeliportPJ76ukBumblepantswardm
  • BumblepantsBumblepants DFW/BGMember Posts: 7,439
    edited July 19
    daewoo said:
    While I didn't order any of the 1x2 vibrant yellow plates like Bumblepants did, I can see lots of uses for them.  Some people just like to complain.
    Perhaps next summer our MILS will align and your trains can ride past my silly colored Ninjago mocs I hope to have made by then.
    560Heliportdaewoo
  • CharmiefcbCharmiefcb SydneyMember Posts: 451
    I have nothing against vibrant yellow but it just looks, off. It looks like a colour a cheap Lego imitator would use to grab attention. I find the colour odd. It does work very well in the City sets in it being a bright colour emergency services would use.
    Brickchap
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 20,483
    If it is not black, white,  any of the greys, browns, tans or any of the sand or dark colours, then it is too vibrant!
    Astrobricks
  • AstrobricksAstrobricks Minnesota, USMember Posts: 5,332
    I find it interesting the almost emotional response some folks seem to have to vibrant yellow. Did your mothers force you to watch exercise videos in the ‘80s?
    CymbelineCharmiefcb560Heliport
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 20,483
    We need a new vibrant bright pink for this dull lady.

    560HeliportAstrobricksFizyx
  • 560Heliport560Heliport Twin Cities, MN, USAMember Posts: 3,379
    It seems my opinion isn't quite as unpopular as I thought.
    ...the obstinate contrarian in me is a little disappointed! 😆
    AstrobricksFizyx
  • FauchFauch FranceMember Posts: 2,633
    that picture with all the vibrant yellow pieces in the technic helicopter review is surprisingly bright.
  • AstrobricksAstrobricks Minnesota, USMember Posts: 5,332
    Fauch said:
    that picture with all the vibrant yellow pieces in the technic helicopter review is surprisingly bright.
    Fluorescent/dayglo colors do tend to give many cameras fits. I’d say @Huw’s camera is doing fairly well :)
  • FauchFauch FranceMember Posts: 2,633
    so it doesn't really blind you in real life ?
  • daewoodaewoo DFWMember Posts: 776
    Nope.  We just sorted a ton of them in our recent LUGBulk order.  Weren't hard on the eyes at all.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 20,483
    daewoo said:
    Nope.  We just sorted a ton of them in our recent LUGBulk order.  Weren't hard on the eyes at all.

    You weren't pushing hard enough.
    BumblepantsAstrobricksFizyxMarshallmariogmonkey76
  • daewoodaewoo DFWMember Posts: 776
    Are you referring to the eye glue technique, by chance?
  • NM10NM10 England Member Posts: 3
    I agree on stickers. A few stickers can really add a lot to the appearance of a set, and I don't find them nearly as difficult to apply as many people make out. 
    560HeliportMr_Cross
  • Mark_CMark_C UKMember Posts: 10
    I may be looking back at Lego from when I was growning up late 70s to mid 80's when Lego was in, at least in part, what is considered its heyday/golden age with nostalga and comparing todays sets to through that filter yet there seems to be way to many licenced sets. There has been some licenced sets in days gone by, such as with VW sets in years gone by, and there has been some good moden use of licencing (e.g. Delorean #10300, {insert other}), it seems to be mostly licenced tie in products these days with Lego.
    Brickfan50
  • klintonklinton CanadaMember Posts: 1,246
    ^ Yes! Exactly! I like to group things from various themes, that have something in common, like pigs: Pigsy from Monkie Kid, the Pig House from Minecraft, Pig Costume Guy from CMF, the Piggy Bank GWP, and some molded pigs from BAM. Just because I think it's a fun group of different pigs, all of LEGO.

    I kinda love it when things are slightly incongruous in Lego. Like, when you have an older model of a vehicle alongside a more refined modern model. Or, like, a molded dog piece hanging out with a brick built one.
    It's *Lego*. It's not reality. All interpretations are equally valid and absolutely belong together. 
    Fizyx560Heliportiwybsdatsunrobbie
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 20,483
    Mark_C said:
    I may be looking back at Lego from when I was growning up late 70s to mid 80's when Lego was in, at least in part, what is considered its heyday/golden age with nostalga and comparing todays sets to through that filter yet there seems to be way to many licenced sets. There has been some licenced sets in days gone by, such as with VW sets in years gone by, and there has been some good moden use of licencing (e.g. Delorean #10300, {insert other}), it seems to be mostly licenced tie in products these days with Lego.
    If you count by theme, licensed outweighs unlicensed sets. But if you count numbers of sets, it is about equal. The issue here is City, Friends and Ninjago are huge these days - about double the number of sets per year compared to what they used to be.
    560HeliportMark_Ciwybs
  • BrickchapBrickchap AustraliaMember Posts: 1,024
    @Mark_C I wasn't around during the 'golden age' of Lego, but I do believe it was much better. I also agree that there are far more licensed sets now than in previous years. As @CCC has said, there are more licensed themes, but it's not so much that unlicensed sets are being 'taken over' by licensed sets.
    As others have correctly said, licensed themes have their place. Personally I avoid random (or any licenses really) in my city because it is meant to be a realistic 1950s European city. But to take Harry Potter for example, I'm not a Potter fan however I am a fan of Lego HP because HP provides me with lots of old fashioned clothes, trunks, candles etc. I recently used the two Ford Anglia's from recent years as police cars with my modular Police Station.
    My only issue is that I do believe Lego is relying on licensed themes too much thesedays. I'm not saying get rid of them, I'd just like to see some more original themes as well. As CCC said, Lego's original themes atm basically constitute City, Friends and Ninjago. That's about it in regards to themes with characters and storylines (as opposed say Creator or Technic). We had some awesome themes in the past like Adventurers, and awesome ones more recently too, such as Atlantis or Monster Fighters. Hidden Side was a nice try, but very poorly executed.
    One thing I would like to bring up is how just about every new idea Lego comes up with goes into Ninjago. Underwater, pirates, islanders, video games, you name it Ninjago has it. Now I'm not dissing Ninjago, it's a very successful theme. But it shouldn't be the only original theme.
    Imagine if Lego had made Sky Pirates its own theme, a sort of Lego Pirates meets steampunk. That would have been quite popular, both with kids and adults (even if it was just for the pieces). Now I'm not saying that should be an evergreen theme, just one of these 3 year ones. Or instead of Lego Avatar (a film no one remembers, certainly not kids today), we could have had a unique space theme combining Classic Space with Elves for example,and focusing on far more peaceful interactions. There's heaps of historical eras and geographical areas Lego hasn't covered previously (as well as existing ideas like Castle and Pirates). Vikings is one that would be popular or ancient Greece or Rome. Personally I wouldn't mind another Alien Conquest type theme if it was set in the 1950s. Kids love aliens, and myself and others love old stuff so win win.
    I would be curious to know why Lego doesn't believe in investing in original themes anymore. (again, I'm not attacking licensed themes here). Sure, some ideas might not sell but that's due to 1. Lego's poor marketing and 2. Simply because one idea doesn't work that doesn't mean you should just give up completely.
    Finally I'd just like to mention Lego World Builder. In short, it's basically Lego Ideas but for an entire theme. (which can be made into a film, TV show, game etc.). I myself am currently involved in Pitch Fest, which is where Lego looks at different theme ideas and chooses one or more. To get to the point, there are lots of fun and interesting ideas for new themes out there from fans. I just hope Lego really engages with that, along with coming up with it's own ideas for new original themes.
    Mark_CBrickfan50
  • OnebricktoomanyOnebricktoomany United StatesMember Posts: 385
    @Brickchap is the name of your country Australia? 
  • BrickchapBrickchap AustraliaMember Posts: 1,024
    @Onebricktoomany Umm last time I checked yes?? Are you trying to find my project on Lego World Builder?
    560HeliportOnebricktoomany
  • TigerAwayTigerAway Member Posts: 10
    I think it might be time to retire the Yellow minifigure head (and obviously body) unless its in relation to a modern interpretation of a classic theme.
    I know it's an icon of the company and everything, but we were able to move onto expressive and detaield faces ok, and now with the expanded range of skin tones this year....maybe time? 
    Or maybe if they did it will be one of those 'New Coke' moments if they did away with it completely....you don't know what you got till it's gone?
    560HeliportFizyx
  • 560Heliport560Heliport Twin Cities, MN, USAMember Posts: 3,379
    edited July 31
    @TigerAway My first reaction was "No! Yellow faces are traditional, I don't want them to go!"
    But after thinking a bit, maybe you're right! We can now have faces that are a pretty good match to any real human. Not perfectly, but reasonably close. 
    I'd also like to see double-sided heads that are male on one side and female on the other.
    And let's get rid of the tiny bit of "skin tone" on a lot of torsos- it just limits which heads you can use on that torso.
    How about including extra heads of various colors?
    FizyxAstrobrickswardm
  • PhoenixioPhoenixio Canada/FranceMember Posts: 221
    I don't think they'll risk it, it might be seen as too racist when people start looking at skin color distribution.  Right now they can use the argument that they're using licenses and just copying the skin tones of existing characters, but that won't be the case with City and others.  So I think they'll stick to yellow for the generic themes.
    iwybswardmOldfan
  • BrickchapBrickchap AustraliaMember Posts: 1,024
    An interesting idea but I would strongly object to it. Firstly, I really don't see the need. Does it really matter what skin colour a plastic person is? Apparently when Lego was first developing minifigs they chose yellow for skin colour as it was the colour kids least associated with any particular race. That's a good thing.
    The great thing about yellow minifigs is that they can be any race, gender etc. In my Lego City I have French, Italian, German, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, African-American, English, Irish, Belgian, Austrian people to name but a few. All of them have regular yellow 'skin' and regular facial features aside from mustaches or what not. Some represent real people I know, others are just people from that part of the world.
    There are heaps of problems with your idea, especially in the era of wokism and political correctness. Firstly, no matter how well meaning and diverse Lego was, someone would undoubtedly complain about racism, sexism whatever and there'd be a big problem.
    Skin colour distribution as Phoenixixo has said would be an issue, how would they decide? One of the good things about yellow minifigs in a City set for example is that they can be anyone, anywhere. A firefighter and firetruck for example could be from America, France, China, South Korea, Australia, anywhere. It's not specific to one geographical region or race of people. What if certain races aren't represented, such as Pacific islanders? More racism accusations.
    Also, you talk about making detailed faces. Ok well take myself and my friends. My Italian and Greek mates have quite round eyes, basically the same as a regular Lego minifigs. They also have quite pale skin.  I have Irish eyes, which are slightly more shaped, and am slightly tanned, while my friend from Singapore (Chinese ethnicity) has obviously more elongated eyes and sort of olive coloured skin. How would you represent this in Lego? Firstly it's obviously very problematic and controversial. But also consider the actual design process. Lego minifig heads aren't that big. How would you show different eye shapes in that small space without either making minifigs look really weird, or especially for people of an Asian ethnicity, looking like a very racist stereotype (even if that's not the intention). How do you capture certain skin tones? Lego would really need to broaden their colour palette. Also, what about people who are Caucasian ethnicity (and skin tone) but have got a tan for example? How do you represent that?
    I agree with @560Heliport about removing skin tone on torso prints. Not only does it limit usage of that print, but the colour of the torso and the colour of the head never match anyway. Yellow almost always comes out a much lighter shade, sometimes almost white. I'm not sure why we need double sided gender heads though?? That wouldn't work with some head pieces, and would prevent one from having regular double sided faces. Perhaps a compromise would be including an equal number of male and female heads in each set that can be swapped, especially for a large set with lots of minifigs like the 90th anniversary castle?
    Also, I'm surprised people are going on about skin colours and 'realistic minifigs' when Lego people don't even have a nose! Lego's portrayal of Native Americans in the Western theme is probably closest to what some of you are envisaging. The Native Americans in the Western theme looked rather strange with their noses and 'realistic' faces. And just on that, if Lego went and got rid of yellow minfigs, there would be a huge difference between new and old sets. They would no longer be compatible. I can take a head from a 1970s minifig and put it on a modern body. I can even take licensed minifigs torsos and use them with yellow heads to be compatible with the rest of my city. Changing would ruin that versatility. I am a firm believer in "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".
    Brickfan50
  • FauchFauch FranceMember Posts: 2,633
    I prefer flesh coloured minifigs. even in non-licensed sets I often prefer non-yellow minifigs (so often non human)
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 20,483
    I prefer fleshies, but I think non-licensed sets should retain yellow skins, but without yellow on the torso unless absolutely necessary (and as gender neutral as possible unless it makes no sense). 

    Can you imagine a City set with two characters - a cop and a robber. They make the first one reddish brown and the other light nougat. No-one says anything. Yet if they do it the other way around, they would be accused of perpetuating racist stereotypes based on that one set, without looking across the whole City theme.  

    There is also the issue of how many of each colour they put in. Which population should they base it on? The World, the Western Hemisphere, Europe, USA, ... and should it be based on the LEGO buying population (so biased towards richer middle classes), and so on. 
    Brickchap560Heliportiwybs
  • jnscoelhojnscoelho PortugalMember Posts: 696
    I would prefer all minifigures to remain yellow.
    If fleshies must exist, limit them to licensed themes, but these should be a minority.

    I do agree with what some have said, about having no skin in the torso, as to make them more interchangeable.
    CymbelinedatsunrobbieandheBrickchapdaewoo
  • im2cre8ivim2cre8iv Utah, USAMember Posts: 160
    I'd also like to see double-sided heads that are male on one side and female on the other.
    I love this idea
    Cymbeline560HeliportFizyx
  • TigerAwayTigerAway Member Posts: 10
    Phoenixio said:
    I don't think they'll risk it, it might be seen as too racist when people start looking at skin color distribution.  Right now they can use the argument that they're using licenses and just copying the skin tones of existing characters, but that won't be the case with City and others.  So I think they'll stick to yellow for the generic themes.

    Well, that's the ballgame!......I hadn't even considered about the implications of choosing a race, rather than a race being dictated by a licensed character that already exists. You're right, there's no point in The Lego Group going anywhere near that third rail!
    But, to play Devil's advocate to some of the perception of racism risks.....if Star Wars, or Marvel are capable of casting a diverse set of actors that doesn't offend, surely Lego would be capable of it as well?
    I get from a PR point of view it's never going to happen and from a collectors point of view, it's good to have worldwide and cross-generational consistency.....I still prefer  the fliehsies mind.





  • vizzitorvizzitor IrelandMember Posts: 461
    edited August 3
    If Lego were to, eh, fleshify the yellow heads in sets, they could do it like in #76399. In that set, there's only instructions for one designated minifigure. Then there are 5 torsos and legs but 11 heads in 5 different colours that are double-sided. There's a range of hair pieces in different styles and colours too. If each double-sided head was very different on each side (old and young, male and female, for example) this would be one way of putting the person building the set in the driver's seat of what character is what fleshy shade.
    One issue was that they all the torsos had to have gloves.
    It could work very well for the new Mission range of sets if they were to ever try it out.
  • LyichirLyichir United StatesMember Posts: 988
    TigerAway said:
    Phoenixio said:
    I don't think they'll risk it, it might be seen as too racist when people start looking at skin color distribution.  Right now they can use the argument that they're using licenses and just copying the skin tones of existing characters, but that won't be the case with City and others.  So I think they'll stick to yellow for the generic themes.

    Well, that's the ballgame!......I hadn't even considered about the implications of choosing a race, rather than a race being dictated by a licensed character that already exists. You're right, there's no point in The Lego Group going anywhere near that third rail!
    But, to play Devil's advocate to some of the perception of racism risks.....if Star Wars, or Marvel are capable of casting a diverse set of actors that doesn't offend, surely Lego would be capable of it as well?
    I get from a PR point of view it's never going to happen and from a collectors point of view, it's good to have worldwide and cross-generational consistency.....I still prefer  the fliehsies mind.
    To be honest, I don't see any reason why Lego couldn't effectively diversify non-licensed themes considering they already have been doing so with the Friends theme. Friends has had flesh-toned figures since the very beginning, but in the early years the skin tones were incredibly limited and the proportion of dark-skinned to light-skinned characters was pretty unbalanced. One reboot and several new skin tones later, and Heartlake City has quite a bit more diversity today, with more distinct ethnicities for the main cast and an incredibly diverse array of side characters (none of whom really rely on stereotypes and several of whom are recurring characters showing up in a variety of contexts and roles).

    I'm personally not too bothered by the continued use of yellow figs, but I recognize that part of that is coming from a place of privilege (as a white person I've never really struggled to "see myself" in the classic yellow faces, even with my selection limited by figs wearing glasses). And to be honest, I probably wouldn't be too bothered if Lego eventually moved on to using fleshies across the board, especially since some of the challenges posed by them (chief among them the relative rarity of certain demographic groups) could be significantly improved if they were available from a wider variety of themes. But I'm not sure how soon that day would come, if at all. There would inevitably be growing pains especially with long-running themes like City or Ninjago having to suddenly make the transition. But I don't necessarily think the challenges it would pose are reason enough not to take on those challenges.

    560HeliportAanchir
  • daewoodaewoo DFWMember Posts: 776
    I like my Lego minifigure heads like I like my mustard - YELLOW.  'Nuff said.
    pxchrisJudgeChuckBrickchap
  • TheOriginalSimonBTheOriginalSimonB Felixstowe Member Posts: 1,737
    I think the biggest issue with going fleshie everywhere is hands.  I believe LEGO don't consider them as parts that users should be swapping out and you would generally want head and hands to match if gloves aren't a factor.
    560HeliportiwybsBrickchap
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 20,483
    pxchris said:
    To me, that's an unpopular opinion for sure. I am 100% team yellow head for life!
    I'm totally the opposite but perfectly happy people like you exist. I need to swap my unwanted yellow heads and hands with someone!

    Lyichir said:
    To be honest, I don't see any reason why Lego couldn't effectively diversify non-licensed themes considering they already have been doing so with the Friends theme.


    Heartlake is a rather positive place though, in that there is no crime, no villains, no confrontation. Whereas in the minifigure based themes there is a lot more confrontation between goodies and baddies, cops and robbers, and so on. And as soon as LEGO has a set that portrays a criminal with reddish brown skin and a cop with light nougat skin, there will be trouble, no matter what is portrayed in other City sets on the shelves at the same time. So for City to change to reaslistic flesh tones, the subjects covered would have to change too.

    They do fleshies in DUPLO too and have some diversity there for family type figures and jobs (medical, fire, pilots, etc). But so far every single criminal has been white. Mind you, so have all the police. It still seems to be one area where LEGO will not diversify skin colours.
    pxchrisiwybsBumblepantsCharmiefcb
  • daewoodaewoo DFWMember Posts: 776
    Sometimes the can of worms is best left unopened, sitting at the back of the highest shelf, well out of sight and mind.
    CymbelineiwybsBrickchapklintonMarshallmarioCharmiefcb
  • 560Heliport560Heliport Twin Cities, MN, USAMember Posts: 3,379
    I like #75323 The Justifier! 
    klintoniwybs
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 20,483
    I like #75323 The Justifier! 
    With what justification?
    560Heliportiwybs
  • LyichirLyichir United StatesMember Posts: 988
    CCC said:
    I like #75323 The Justifier! 
    With what justification?
    Surely with a name like that it ought to be able to justify itself? :P

    560HeliportiwybsGothamConstructionCoAanchir
  • 560Heliport560Heliport Twin Cities, MN, USAMember Posts: 3,379
    CCC said:
    I like #75323 The Justifier! 
    With what justification?
    I think it looks cool; that's pretty much the only justification a LEGO set needs! (IMO)
    klintonIstokg
  • shikadishikadi TRU AlumniMember Posts: 138
    The last golden era for LEGO was 2009-2014. Sets have been in a consistent decline since. Im in a weird place where there’s never been more sets marketed towards me, but very few of them I actually want. I’d probably enter a new dark age if it weren’t for the vibrant community inspiring me to moc and rebrickable for creating sets I really want to
    build.
    BrickchapFollowsCloselyGothamConstructionCo
  • PhoenixioPhoenixio Canada/FranceMember Posts: 221
    shikadi said:
    The last golden era for LEGO was 2009-2014. 
    Interesting take.  With nowadays wide array of colors and pieces available, plus the large amount of modulars and other sets aimed at adults, I'd say this is a golden age.  Sure 2009-2014 probably had fewer licensed series and more originals, but these past few years it's like Lego finally understood that there's an adult market of fans who want more complicated builds made for display.  That sure will be regarded, in the future, as an important point of Lego history, if I might say.
    560Heliportiwybs
  • BrickchapBrickchap AustraliaMember Posts: 1,024
    @shikadi Thanks for sharing this option. I absolutely agree. Definitely for City. They had a lot more different and unique ideas for sets back then, including even within Police and Fire like the water based fire theme (the one with a helicopter with a bucket), forest fire and police etc. Not to mention all the cool unique themes like mining, cargo, garage, sets like Public Transport, the original Great Vehicles etc etc.
    Furthermore,  I really liked how that era of sets had regular minifigs that could largely be used in any era. Thesedays the minifigs are super specific to 2022. In the past you could get a regular chap or lady maybe driving a car or a customer in a cafe and they could work for just about any era (many of these happily live in my 1950s city), as well as not looking out of place next to a minifig made in 2021 for example, and they also work for different geographical regions and settings. Whereas thesedays, all the minifigs look like young people like 16-20 in a beach town with the occasional 'elderly' person (who all look the same). The lady in Boutique Hotel for example looked completely out of place for a 1950s hotel, plus the top she was wearing was the sort of thing a young girl wears at the beach, rather than something a middle aged/elderly lady wears around a fancy hotel.
    The Golden Age of Modulars was 2014-2017 in my opinion. I can't comment as much on other themes like Ninjago for example. But I would mention all the awesome original themes we had in the 2009-2014 period. Castle and Pirates are obviously examples, but also Atlantis, Mars Mission, Galaxy Squad, Alien Conquest, Power Miners, Space Police (III I think it is?), Pharaohs Quest to name but a very few. (I'm undoubtedly missing a few, they aren't bad themes I just can't think of any more atm).
    Phoenixico is right about more parts, but that applies to any era of Lego. I disagree about more adult sets. Consider Imperial Flagship, Emerald Night (as well as Maersk Train and Horizon Express), VW Camper Van, Effiel Tower, Medieval Market Village, Kingdoms Joust, to name but a few. In my opinion most of the sets adults really like are ones made during that 2009-2014 period, while modern ones such as Pirates of Barracuda Bay or Medieval Blacksmith, while good, are in part only popular because for so long we haven't got any historical theme sets. I would disagree about colours. The new colours tend to be super bright colours that while nice for kids really aren't helpful to us AFOLs.
    shikadi
  • PhoenixioPhoenixio Canada/FranceMember Posts: 221
    Brickchap said:

    Phoenixico is right about more parts, but that applies to any era of Lego. I disagree about more adult sets. Consider Imperial Flagship, Emerald Night (as well as Maersk Train and Horizon Express), VW Camper Van, Effiel Tower, Medieval Market Village, Kingdoms Joust, to name but a few. In my opinion most of the sets adults really like are ones made during that 2009-2014 period, while modern ones such as Pirates of Barracuda Bay or Medieval Blacksmith, while good, are in part only popular because for so long we haven't got any historical theme sets. I would disagree about colours. The new colours tend to be super bright colours that while nice for kids really aren't helpful to us AFOLs.

    It looks to me like you have either tunnel vision or nostalgia filter, because in absolute, there are way more colors now than before.  Same for the number of parts.  We're not looking at the gradient (new piece/color per year), but the total amount of colors and pieces available.  Nougat?  Medium lavender?  The return in great quantities of sand green?  Medium azure?  We're not just talking about that one new color that people aren't used to yet, neon yellow or whatever, but for sure it'll find its way into sets and MOCs as well, just like every other color before.  I think it's fairly ridiculous to blame the variety of colors, even if one or two become more niche.  The more the merrier, isn't it?

    And the few sets you've mentioned revolve around Castle or Pirate, which are aimed at kids although adults love them too.  But look at Ideas.  Or Creator Expert/18+/Icons.  The flower sets.  The numerous modulars since.  The Ninjago City sets.  The chinese festival sets.  The large scale Star Wars sets.  The Marvel sets making it into modulars as well.  Those stadiums, shoes, and other unusual new-markets sets.  All of those there were no hints of in the "golden age" of 2009-2014, and yet here they are, today, 2022.

    As for the clothings of 1950, you've had this argument here before, and you're probably still one of the few with this vision, so...  give it some time before opening that can of worms again! :P
  • BrickchapBrickchap AustraliaMember Posts: 1,024
    The clothes of minifigs from 2009-2014 were modern, regular contemporary stuff for that time. But they were also generic enough that they could work for 1950s, 1930s, 1980s, a steampunk MOC, a retro space MOC, whatever. Not sure why this is so hard for people to understand??
  • iwybsiwybs PlutoMember Posts: 331
    I like #75323 The Justifier! 
    I like it to the tune of $130!
    560Heliport
  • PhoenixioPhoenixio Canada/FranceMember Posts: 221
    Brickchap said:
     Not sure why this is so hard for people to understand??
    I don't think it's about understanding, it's probably more about caring.  I'm glad we get variation on clothes, not just some generic shirts and uniforms!  You have to recognize that it's a very specific thing in its generic-ness that you want :P
    Lyichir
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