Please refrain from posting animated GIFs, memes, joke videos and so on in discussions other than those in the off topic area.

Dismiss this message to confirm your acceptance of this additional forum term of use.

Stranger Things General Discussion

24

Comments

  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,721
    edited May 17
    I used that excuse to binge watch 'Tidying Up with Marie Kondo'.

    It didn't take.  But I now organize my socks and t-shirts much more efficiently.

    (If only they made some GoT LEGO, then I could have an excuse to catch-up on that series...)
    kbwbrickventurescatwrangler
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,510
    I've just binge watched Breaking Bad (took me 26 days) and Dexter (took me 42 days), does that mean there will be sets? I also just binge watched Richard Chamberlain's Shogun, although that only took 2 evenings so was more light relief than a binge.

    I might watch this Stranger Things now too.

    mattytrekscatwrangler
  • PolyphemusPolyphemus Sydney, AustraliaMember Posts: 90
    andhe said:
    Considering the supposed popularity of the  show I'm amazed at the number of people saying they've never heard of it. I can understand that from the 'man on the street' but I would have expected that if you're an Internet user you would have been exposed to it at some point in the last 3 years.
    Well... I have the Interwebs but I'm also officially a luddite (or 'cranky old man' if that's your preferred terminology). One of these days I might even get me one of them 'Smart-phonie' things that the kids keep talking about...
    560Heliportandhedmcc0Baby_YodaJern92
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,510
    andhe said:
    Considering the supposed popularity of the  show I'm amazed at the number of people saying they've never heard of it. I can understand that from the 'man on the street' but I would have expected that if you're an Internet user you would have been exposed to it at some point in the last 3 years.
    Well... I have the Interwebs but I'm also officially a luddite (or 'cranky old man' if that's your preferred terminology). One of these days I might even get me one of them 'Smart-phonie' things that the kids keep talking about...
    Kids don't talk, they IM and WhatsApp. Although I'm often out of date, so they've probably moved on from those by now.
    560HeliportPolyphemusmatticus_bricks
  • SeanTheCollectorSeanTheCollector BirminghamMember Posts: 736
    Mine just arrived this morning after I ordered it online on Wednesday. An incredible set which I'm looking forward to building.

    As a collector, it's an excellent value set when I compare it with other themes since my collection is complete with a single purchase! I'm not counting the instore build as a proper set! :-)
    I've only watched a few episodes on Netflix but I plan on watching both seasons soon. I'm just keeping my eye out for a Live Build youtube event (in English I might add). If anyone knows of an upcoming event for this set, please let me know!
    mattytreksFowlerBricksomniumcatwrangler
  • dmcc0dmcc0 Nae far fae AberdeenMember Posts: 668
    edited May 17
    Continuing the theme of old people not keeping up with the youth of today, I've never heard of a Live Build YouTube event.  Is that just watching someone build the set in realtime on Youtube?

    Edit:  Just looked it up, and it seems that is what it is.  One question...Why???
    BumblepantsPolyphemusCM4Sgmonkey76
  • PyrobugPyrobug Louisville, KyMember Posts: 91
    ^^I wasn't sure if that was what it was either. Jangbricks has a video of him building the set on his relatively new purebuilds channel.
    I sure can't sit and watch a six hour video all at once but I like watching LEGO being built and I like to support Jang in whatever he does. It's at least good to have on in the background to relax or fall asleep to. It's LEGO ASMR!


    SeanTheCollectorPitfall69
  • SeanTheCollectorSeanTheCollector BirminghamMember Posts: 736
    ^ I've enjoyed having a live build event on in the background while building a given set in the past, particularly for a larger set. I wouldn't be able to focus on an actual programme while building in most cases. Some presenters discuss interesting details of the sets that are being built that I wouldn't otherwise discover.
  • PyrobugPyrobug Louisville, KyMember Posts: 91
    I'll have to try having a similar video on while I'm building sometime. That's one thing that I feel is missing from purebuilds...commentary. He's said before that he doesn't like to talk while building just to hear himself talk or because he feels obligated to be entertaining while building. He said there are only so many times you can say "Look how these two pieces go together. Isn't that interesting?" But if there is some thought that he feels is worth sharing, I would like to hear it.
  • SeanTheCollectorSeanTheCollector BirminghamMember Posts: 736
    Pyrobug said:
    ^^I wasn't sure if that was what it was either. Jangbricks has a video of him building the set on his relatively new purebuilds channel.
    I sure can't sit and watch a six hour video all at once but I like watching LEGO being built and I like to support Jang in whatever he does. It's at least good to have on in the background to relax or fall asleep to. It's LEGO ASMR!

    I haven't seen Jang's build videos before but I would prefer him to provide some commentary! I'm not fussed about chat dialogs or group builds where the screen flips between multiple builders but the above video is so quiet! Still, I might give it a go if I don't find a better build video before I decide to build the set.
  • mattytreksmattytreks San Diego, CAMember Posts: 111
    The excitement of The Upside Down already has me anticipating when we can expect the next Stranger Things set.
    matticus_bricks
  • SparkyHamSparkyHam Bristol, UKMember Posts: 133
    Similar to some of the Overwatch sets, once I'd read-up about some of the mythos of Stranger Things, I became interested in the IP and ordered it online. Whilst I don't have time to get into Overwatch as a computer game, I am definitely looking forward to watching Stranger Things over the Summer. Helps that I'm an 80's kid too.

    In terms of price, I'm beginning to accept that there IS inherent value in the theme and not just in terms of cost-per-piece. I'm willing to pay more for something that actually interests me over a larger set that is generic. And in some ways, I'm glad the Stranger Things set isn't too big - It seem's like it wouldn't look too out of place on a bookshelf or desk.
    Wicksy80
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,790
    dmcc0 said:
    Continuing the theme of old people not keeping up with the youth of today, I've never heard of a Live Build YouTube event.  Is that just watching someone build the set in realtime on Youtube?

    Edit:  Just looked it up, and it seems that is what it is.  One question...Why???
    I watch live builds, but mostly when it's friends of mine building, or a set I haven't seen any detailed reviews of yet but want to see the internal workings of.

    One big part of the appeal of both live builds and video game livestreams is that in this day and age, the comments section is often used not only to interact with the other viewers but also with the presenter. So it sort of becomes an opportunity for people who don't have the set/game in question to have their questions answered live by people who do, or even suggest them things to try out that they might not have covered in a review. That social component is I think one of the big factors in any "live" online activity.
    SumoLegodmcc0LyichirpxchrisLittleLori
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,721
    There's people that post videos of unboxings of product.  Atleast with a live build - something is being accomplished.
    PyrobugPolyphemusMr_Crossgmonkey76
  • SeanTheCollectorSeanTheCollector BirminghamMember Posts: 736
    ^ I have so many boxed sets that I'm relunctant to open because of a lack of time to build and space to display, that I have found myself watching unboxing videos occasionally! :)
  • dmcc0dmcc0 Nae far fae AberdeenMember Posts: 668
     Aanchir said:
    dmcc0 said:
    Continuing the theme of old people not keeping up with the youth of today, I've never heard of a Live Build YouTube event.  Is that just watching someone build the set in realtime on Youtube?

    Edit:  Just looked it up, and it seems that is what it is.  One question...Why???
    I watch live builds, but mostly when it's friends of mine building, or a set I haven't seen any detailed reviews of yet but want to see the internal workings of.

    One big part of the appeal of both live builds and video game livestreams is that in this day and age, the comments section is often used not only to interact with the other viewers but also with the presenter. So it sort of becomes an opportunity for people who don't have the set/game in question to have their questions answered live by people who do, or even suggest them things to try out that they might not have covered in a review. That social component is I think one of the big factors in any "live" online activity.
    Despite my original "old" comment, I'm not exactly ancient and certainly not as old as your "in this day and age" comment implies ;)

    I still don't get it, although I'm pretty (read very) unsociable so it's probably just that aspect that makes no sense to me (and to be honest, social media in general).  I can't get me head around why a) somebody feels the need to stream themselves building a set (or playing a game or whatever) and b) why people actually spend time watching/discussing someone doing a) 

    I think watching someone build a set that I haven't built yet kind of spoils it for me; I want to experience it for myself, not watch someone else do it.  As for building techniques etc, I can alway check out the instructions online if I want to see something I don't have.  Sitting through a lengthy video just to maybe see an interesting technique is just not going to happen when I can download the instructions and get right to the part I'm interested in.

    Same goes for the game aspect.  I don't play a huge amount of games anymore, but I do enjoy gaming, even online despite my unsociable tendencies.  But watching someone else play, especially in real-time, would be mind numbing.  I guess It largely depends on the types of games you are into as well; I suppose with some games it's similar to watching a sport, for example Rocket League, Smash Bros, Fifa etc, but then given the option of spending a couple of hours playing or watching any of those games playing would win every time for me.

    Given how popular streaming activities seem to be, I guess it's just me...
    oldtodd33PJ76ukmustang69klintonomniumLittleLori
  • oldtodd33oldtodd33 Denver 4800 miles to BillundMember Posts: 2,402
    ^ It's not just you, I don't understand watching people do either of them. Imagine my shock when my kids told me that some people actually pay to watch others play video games on something called Twitch!
    klintongmonkey76LittleLori
  • BumblepantsBumblepants Sofia BG/Dallas TXMember Posts: 5,650
    I used to think videogame streaming was stupid but I have since come around to appreciate it. Last weekend I was watching a Destiny 2 tournament held in the UK by some of the top players and it was being commentated and it was exactly the same as watching a sporting event. Made up for the lack of Premier League action that day.
  • LyichirLyichir United StatesMember Posts: 702
    oldtodd33 said:
    ^ It's not just you, I don't understand watching people do either of them. Imagine my shock when my kids told me that some people actually pay to watch others play video games on something called Twitch!
    For me, video game streaming and live builds also offer the ability to vicariously live through another person building a set or playing a video game for the first time. You can always rebuild a set or replay a game for yourself, but it's never quite the same as when you first put it together. So in that way you can experience somebody else experiencing those same magic moments.

    On a similar note, live builds or live video game streams allow me to experience a build or video game that I DON'T plan on getting myself. Both video games and Lego are expensive hobbies, and there's no way for me to personally experience everything there is to offer. So I might watch somebody play a game live if it's not really suited to my particular preferences or skill sets, or is exclusive to a console I don't have, but I still want to know what the fuss is about. Similarly, with Lego, just because I don't collect things like giant UCS Star Wars sets and as such would rather spend my money on other themes doesn't mean I won't appreciate seeing how they go together with somebody else building them.
    PyrobugAanchirAyliffeLittleLori
  • pharmjodpharmjod 1,170 miles to Wall Drug, USAMember Posts: 2,871
    I try not to live vicariously through anyone if I can help it :)
    klintondmcc0gmonkey76
  • jmeninnojmeninno The Batcave (MA)Member Posts: 687
    ^Yes.  LOL
  • vwong19vwong19 San DiegoMember Posts: 1,164
    I admit I like watching movie reviews and video reactions to some movie trailers, especially Kevin Smith’s on Marvel films.
    SumoLego
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,790
    Some of the loot haul/unboxing stuff confuses me too, but I think with regard to video game livestreams and video series it's often less about "look at me enjoy product X", but rather about the drama of watching people confront a challenge. Similarly to sports or game shows, there's an emergent narrative as you watch the participants encounter new challenges and obstacles. Sometimes the challenge is simply the goal of the game itself, while other times the players add other self-imposed challenges, such as attempts to set records for fastest completion ("speedrunning"), highest score, or even sillier challenges like trying to reach an objective in a combat-driven game without killing any creatures (a "pacifist run").
    Compare with how back in the days of arcade games, it was often popular not only to play the game yourself but to gather around and watch a particularly skilled player achieve feats beyond anything you can manage yourself.
    In a lot of cases LEGO live builds or video game livestreams can also be thought of as another form of "review". Only in this case, instead of the reviewer simply TELLING you what they thought of their gameplay/building experience after the fact, you can actually witness what their experience is like firsthand — including what parts they find particularly exciting, boring, surprising, repetitive, easy, or difficult.
    And of course, there's an entertainment element, as the people who get the most views often are those who have a funny or charismatic personality or can construct an amusing fictional persona.
    For another comparison to more traditional media, look at the popularity of the show Top Gear. It's not just about watching strangers enjoying cars, but also about seeing drivers attempt various challenges, hearing the presenters' comedic banter, etc. Also compare with Mystery Science Theater 3000. Sure, some people can enjoy watching bad old movies on their own instead of watching somebody watching a movie. But the hosts add an additional layer of entertainment via their comedic commentary.
    A video game livestream or LEGO live build is sort of the same way, where the video's entertainment value depends as much or more on the host as whatever activity they're participating in.
    LyichirCymbelinebrickventuresBaby_Yodadmcc0catwranglerstlux
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,721
    edited May 21
    vwong19 said:
    ...especially Kevin Smith’s on Marvel films.
    I live vicariously through his emotional reactions to Marvel movies.  I feel as though I have a soul.  Sometimes.

    I love you 3000.
    vwong19catwrangler
  • stoshu73stoshu73 Member Posts: 3
    Anyone else have issues with keeping the pillars and roof from separating? 
    klintoncolay
  • mattytreksmattytreks San Diego, CAMember Posts: 111
    Finally got around to completing my Voltron set picked up at SDCC last year...

    Perfect timing really, since my Stranger Things set arrived in the mail today.  Can’t wait to build and display this one.

    Also, for those interested in placing this set on a rotating swivel base, this looks like a great option:
    https://www.displays2go.com/P-32542/
    klinton
  • klintonklinton CanadaMember Posts: 417
    Aanchir said:
    Some of the loot haul/unboxing stuff confuses me too, but I think with regard to video game livestreams and video series it's often less about "look at me enjoy product X", but rather about the drama of watching people confront a challenge. Similarly to sports or game shows, there's an emergent narrative as you watch the participants encounter new challenges and obstacles. Sometimes the challenge is simply the goal of the game itself, while other times the players add other self-imposed challenges, such as attempts to set records for fastest completion ("speedrunning"), highest score, or even sillier challenges like trying to reach an objective in a combat-driven game without killing any creatures (a "pacifist run").
    Compare with how back in the days of arcade games, it was often popular not only to play the game yourself but to gather around and watch a particularly skilled player achieve feats beyond anything you can manage yourself.
    In a lot of cases LEGO live builds or video game livestreams can also be thought of as another form of "review". Only in this case, instead of the reviewer simply TELLING you what they thought of their gameplay/building experience after the fact, you can actually witness what their experience is like firsthand — including what parts they find particularly exciting, boring, surprising, repetitive, easy, or difficult.
    And of course, there's an entertainment element, as the people who get the most views often are those who have a funny or charismatic personality or can construct an amusing fictional persona.
    For another comparison to more traditional media, look at the popularity of the show Top Gear. It's not just about watching strangers enjoying cars, but also about seeing drivers attempt various challenges, hearing the presenters' comedic banter, etc. Also compare with Mystery Science Theater 3000. Sure, some people can enjoy watching bad old movies on their own instead of watching somebody watching a movie. But the hosts add an additional layer of entertainment via their comedic commentary.
    A video game livestream or LEGO live build is sort of the same way, where the video's entertainment value depends as much or more on the host as whatever activity they're participating in.
    Can I be brutally honest here? That all just sounds incredibly lonely. I mean, it's fun to watch your friends have fun playing games while you're hanging out. Or freak out at jump scares. Or get slaughtered by a particularly brutal boss fight. Or, better still, to get taken down by yourself in a racing/fighting/fps game, hahaha. But to sit alone and watch random strangers? I mean.... why? Even those kids hanging out at the arcade were being social. 

    I don't understand much of today's culture though, tbh. Everyone's always so busy staring at a screen, 24/7, to bother actually living anymore. Hell, people pull out their phones constantly even while out and about, supposedly being social. Reality programming (and, by extension, "Youtubers') is an absolute affront to basic humanity. I've absolutely no interest in avidly following the contrived antics of random people whom I've never met. I can't even begin to fathom the appeal. 

    People just seem to have forgotten how to be content and self sufficient, and just cave to an insatiable need to be 'entertained' constantly, to the point where they will sit and mindlessly watch anything and everything rather than get up and do something. It kind of strikes me as a bit off to see people endorsing this sort of removed spectatorship on a fan site for a full on hobby with limitless potential. I don't quite understand the point where anyone here can find themselves so bored that tuning into Youtuber X's discussion of.... anything... is the most desirable activity on the table. Pull out some bricks and build! If you want commentary, then invite a friend over to build with you. This is what a hobby is supposed to be: a default activity to fill those moments. 

    I dunno. I literally just don't get the appeal. It all just seems so hollow to me. It's all a poor substitute for actual activity and entertainment. /geezer rant. :p
    PJ76ukdmcc0oldtodd33pharmjodLittleLori
  • Baby_YodaBaby_Yoda The world's backsideMember Posts: 1,169
    edited May 22
    I'd bet my whole collection that your grandparents thought the same thing about colour TV. This isn't some crazy turning point in all of history where millennials are suddenly wildly different to the previous generation. I'm sure kids these days will say the same thing in fifty years.
    Times change, old man. Get with the program. :p
    BumblepantsPyrobugcatwranglerAanchirstluxdmcc0SumoLegoAyliffe
  • catwranglercatwrangler Northern IrelandMember Posts: 1,732
    And it's not always practical to invite friends over, especially as you get older and everybody's got more and more responsibilities in terms of work, kids/caring for family members, keeping the house from looking like a pigsty... I don't know about you guys, but since I've been in my 30s especially, it feels like a major coup to find a time when both I and a friend are free to do stuff. And that's assuming your Lego friends are even in the same town or country - which is presumably why many of us are on Brickset; we like being able to plug into a place where there will reliably be other Lego enthusiasts to talk to. 

    I was very late to get into the toy collector side of YouTube and I used to be bemused by haul videos: "God, how banal and materialistic..." and you know, maybe I wasn't wrong, but now I do enjoy them on occasion. Sort of like window shopping, but with the pleasure of someone else's enthusiasm. 

    Baby_YodaAanchir
  • mattytreksmattytreks San Diego, CAMember Posts: 111
    Watching vloggers like JANGBRiCKS or BrickVault spend 20-30 minutes talking through and appreciating all the little nuanced details of a given set makes me appreciate that set even more -- to the degree that it might even convince me to invest in the set.
    catwranglergmonkey76
  • Baby_YodaBaby_Yoda The world's backsideMember Posts: 1,169
    And it's not always practical to invite friends over, especially as you get older and everybody's got more and more responsibilities in terms of work, kids/caring for family members, keeping the house from looking like a pigsty... I don't know about you guys, but since I've been in my 30s especially, it feels like a major coup to find a time when both I and a friend are free to do stuff.
    Yup. I literally live with my mates yet we hardly ever find the time to sit around for a game of DnD or something.
    Aanchircatwrangler
  • dmcc0dmcc0 Nae far fae AberdeenMember Posts: 668
    Watching vloggers like JANGBRiCKS or BrickVault spend 20-30 minutes talking through and appreciating all the little nuanced details of a given set makes me appreciate that set even more -- to the degree that it might even convince me to invest in the set.
    I do watch quite a few reviews, in particular Jang, and I do think they are mostly entertaining and informative - although I do often find Jangs reviews to be a little on the long side for my liking.  Like you say though, they do sometimes help me decide if a set is worth getting (or not in some cases), or pointing out new/interesting parts/minifigs etc.

    I think 10-15 mins max is my limit for a review though, any longer and I start to get a bit bored by it all, certainly couldn't sit through a 30min review or a real-time build that might last several hours; especially as Jangs real time builds don't even have any commentary on them so he's not even pointing out interesting part/techniques etc on those as others apparently do.
  • klintonklinton CanadaMember Posts: 417
    My point wasn't necessarily about being social. It was about not filling your time vicariously experiencing things via strangers online. Watching someone else doing something (be it a live stream gaming session, or a live build, or eating Tide Pods, or whatever else) versus physically doing something - anything - yourself is where I see the issue. It just seems tragic, imho. You don't need other company 24/7 to be contented. I just don't understand what is achieved by passively experiencing other people's self amusement when you could be doing something yourself. 

    @Baby_Yoda: The world has changed dramatically over the past 80 odd years. Hell, in my 41 years on the planet I've literally watched society become increasingly more reclusive in strides, to the point were meeting someone's eye on the metro or in an elevator is deemed an affront (on the rare occasion they actually look up from intently staring at thier phone). Where one used to set aside an hour or two a week to catch their favorite programmes, people now spend entire days 'binging' complete seasons in succession, and spend every idle minute in between devouring literally anything and everything presented online on thier phones (and then complain about somehow not having the time for a D&D game with thier flatmates, hahaha). Gross obesity is now an epidemic, and not an aberration. Perhaps our grandparents would have been correct in being suspicious of colour television? This downhill slide is not merely a typical generational rite of passage as people always want to postulate. Society today is markedly different from anything in human history. 

    All of that is a much larger discussion though. My initial point here was merely that I loathe the idea of watching others do things for 'entertainment'. I was just tossing out my own two cents on the subject. 


    dmcc0PolyphemuspharmjodBaby_Yodadatsunrobbieoldtodd33LittleLoriCrownie
  • benbacardibenbacardi EnglandMember Posts: 316
    klinton said:
    Watching someone else doing something (be it a live stream gaming session, or a live build, or eating Tide Pods, or whatever else) versus physically doing something - anything - yourself is where I see the issue. It just seems tragic, imho.

    My initial point here was merely that I loathe the idea of watching others do things for 'entertainment'. 
    Does that apply to watching sport? For centuries people have found entertainment by simply "watching others do things" - and I've never heard sports fans referred to as "tragic" before!

    That said, I'm not really a fan of any sport, but I can see the appeal - I do watch some tennis and snooker if it's on in the background somewhere.
    AyliffeAanchirmsandersJern92
  • klintonklinton CanadaMember Posts: 417
    klinton said:
    Watching someone else doing something (be it a live stream gaming session, or a live build, or eating Tide Pods, or whatever else) versus physically doing something - anything - yourself is where I see the issue. It just seems tragic, imho.

    My initial point here was merely that I loathe the idea of watching others do things for 'entertainment'. 
    Does that apply to watching sport? For centuries people have found entertainment by simply "watching others do things" - and I've never heard sports fans referred to as "tragic" before!

    That said, I'm not really a fan of any sport, but I can see the appeal - I do watch some tennis and snooker if it's on in the background somewhere.
    Watching sport is a communal experience though. It is a shared activity with your fellow citizens, rooting for the home team. The athletes themselves are active members of your own community. They're people you meet and who participate in day to day life in your city (Subban is still active in supporting community programs and charities here in Montréal, years after being traded). 

    I suppose, on some obscure level, it's not entirely different. But sport has always been a tentpole of community life. It's a shared experience, be it attending the games and galas, or exitedly discussing the game at the water cooler. 
    SumoLegoLittleLori
  • benbacardibenbacardi EnglandMember Posts: 316
    I think that's true for some sports fans, probably even most - but an awful lot of people I know support a football team / F1 driver / snooker player / rugby team / etc that's not local at all, they've obviously never personally met the athletes, who give nothing back to their local community. And they'll watch these matches / games / etc from the comfort of their own home, by themselves.

    I don't see it as too different, really. The "water cooler" in this case is either these forums ("did you see Jang's video on such-and-such?") or the comments on the videos themselves.
    klintonAanchircatwranglerLittleLori
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,721
    klinton said:
    Society today is markedly different from anything in human history. 
    Although I agree that society is very different, humans are fundamentally the same.  Social people look to be with other people; introverted people prefer to avoid as much social contact.  Overall, I think we are just a more interconnected society with almost unlimited access to information.

    I'm sure you could go back through human history and find rude people in high society, happiness amongs those in poverty or under extreme oppression, and some serf in medieval France complaining about his neighbor's chickens crapping on his dirt farm.
    Baby_YodasonsofscevaAanchircatwranglerLittleLori
  • sonsofscevasonsofsceva 1904 World's FairMember Posts: 537
    The good old dirt farms; a highly underrated crop!
    AanchircatwranglerSumoLegodmcc0
  • BumblepantsBumblepants Sofia BG/Dallas TXMember Posts: 5,650
    edited May 24
    Season 3 has a teaser out. I am enthused to see we are getting more Billy. Mullets forever!
    catwranglerklinton
  • Baby_YodaBaby_Yoda The world's backsideMember Posts: 1,169
    klinton said:
    I just don't understand what is achieved by passively experiencing other people's self amusement when you could be doing something yourself.
    It's been explained to you several times now. I think we can agree that different upbringings, lifestyles and points in our lives can make it near-impossible to understand how others behave so differently. I'm sure I'll get mad at my future kids for spending too much time with their entire consciousness in the Virtual Reality Dimension playing Pokemon Go 2 instead of studying for their spaceship licence.
    catwranglerAyliffeklinton
  • LyichirLyichir United StatesMember Posts: 702
    klinton said:
    My point wasn't necessarily about being social. It was about not filling your time vicariously experiencing things via strangers online. Watching someone else doing something (be it a live stream gaming session, or a live build, or eating Tide Pods, or whatever else) versus physically doing something - anything - yourself is where I see the issue. It just seems tragic, imho. You don't need other company 24/7 to be contented. I just don't understand what is achieved by passively experiencing other people's self amusement when you could be doing something yourself.


    Well, one aspect of it that makes it easier is that, especially with a slow-paced stream like a live build, it's extremely easy to watch when multitasking. I can have something like that on in the background when I'm either doing an essential task like laundry or homework or a non-essential activity like browsing the internet or building on LDD, only checking back in on the stream when the presenters are highlighting features or another milestone in the build. Also, especially when the presenter is a friend, you can contribute tips or questions in the chat during the build, making it much more of a participatory social thing. Obviously that doesn't necessarily apply to, say, some of the most popular video game streamers who have thousands of viewers at any given time. But I tend to be more fond of the smaller, more personal sorts of streams in general.
    AanchircatwranglerAyliffe
  • pxchrispxchris Oregon, USAMember Posts: 458
    I'm of the older generation (hitting 40 soon), an introvert, and rather enjoy having YouTube reviews on in the background while I'm working on other things. I have also tuned into live builds, and watched speed builds (never sat through a real-time, non-live build though). The haul videos I do have a bit more of an issue with, although I've watched many Jang and BrickTsar hauls. Probably my favorite videos though are the ones showcasing MOCs (in particular Beyond the Brick). I don't see it at all as being a recluse as I also have an active social life with both friends and family.

    I actually really appreciated the analogy to watching sports! I think that's a fitting parallel. For me, sports is absolutely no more of a communal activity than LEGO is. I enjoy both, and have about the same level of interaction with other fans in both realms. If anything, LEGO for me is even more communal, though that community happens to be largely online (I'd love more in person LEGO activity, but my local LUG is over an hour away and the meetings clash schedule wise with mine).

    For me, having those YouTube videos on while I'm building myself or working on other tasks is absolutely no different than having a TV program on. It's enjoyable entertainment. It's also entertainment that actually helps me enjoy my hobby more. I've ended up both purchasing and passing on sets after seeing an in-depth review.
    brickventuresAanchir
  • pxchrispxchris Oregon, USAMember Posts: 458
    Also, to get a bit more back on topic, I made a trip to my closest LEGO store on Wednesday and saw the Stranger Things set in person. It's such a good looking set on display! The detail is absolutely spectacular.

    But to tie into the rest of what this thread has digressed into, I also have to really agree with Jang's review comment than while looking at it, it doesn't really feel like $200 worth of LEGO stuff.

    That said, it's still definitely on my want list and hopefully I'll figure out a time to buy it this year.
    klintonLittleLori
  • colaycolay OxfordshireMember Posts: 309
    stoshu73 said:
    Anyone else have issues with keeping the pillars and roof from separating? 
    Yes. Had to redo both upside down and downside up, because of it
  • BrainsluggedBrainslugged England (the grim North)Member Posts: 748
    edited May 24
    colay said:
    Yes. Had to redo both upside down and downside up, because of it
    For others who may get this at some point, what exactly was the issue? Do you just need to make sure that all the roof is pressed together as much as possible?
    SeanTheCollector
  • colaycolay OxfordshireMember Posts: 309
    edited May 24
    I think it comes from a combiation of thesmall tiles not quite having enough grip when put into the roof, and then whenn you press the roof elements together. Then, there's also the 'handling' of the two buildings when going together, it all can shift slightly. No biggie, but is a little frustarting. I'd suggest making sure all roof bits when putting together are well and truly firm;y pressed together, before attaching is only real advice i can give
    Brainsluggedklintongmonkey76
  • gmonkey76gmonkey76 ChicagoMember Posts: 1,418
    You should see the copy my lego store has out for customers to play with. The tiles on the tree stands are all scratched up. There are gaps in the roof, and the front porch supports.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Recent discussions Categories Privacy Policy