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LEGO fight Against Chinese counterfeit LEGO

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Comments

  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,771
    daewoo said:
    I know a guy who is 100% convinced that Lepin is actually Lego, so the scenario just presented would be completely plausible to him.
    Just the other day I was thinking "all conspiracy theories and other hot takes about this news aside, at least it should put to rest the absurd theory that Lepin sets are being manufactured by LEGO in LEGO's own factory". But you make a good point, I probably shouldn't sell conspiracy theorists short on the lengths they'll go to to validate their beliefs…

    I suspect a big purpose of this public announcement by Shanghai Police IS propagandistic, but less about actively deceiving the general public into thinking IP enforcement is more active than it really is, and more about sending a message to other bootleggers: "hey, a lot of you have gotten away with this so far but you could be next".

    Part of why counterfeiting continues to proliferate is the perception that it's "easy money". But even if plenty of people are getting away with it, not having any idea whether YOUR business might be one of the ones that gets taken down kind of takes a bit of the sparkle out of those types of business prospects.

    Ultimately, the issue of counterfeiting is unlikely to EVER go away entirely… after all, even if Lepin was the first knock-off of high enough accuracy and wide enough availability to really get such widespread attention in the AFOL community, the issue has existed for far, far longer. I suspect that many AFOLs wouldn't have even paid so much attention to Lepin if they'd stuck to targeting kid-beloved themes that I'm sure make up a great deal of their business, instead of also having cheap knock-offs of retired sets that are highly sought after among adult collectors.

    So it has to be understood that the objective of fighting counterfeiting is not to eradicate the issue, but to diminish it or keep it from growing, and one of the most effective strategies for that is just to show that there ARE legal ramifications that CAN be enforced.

    I remember when people were saying it would be impossible for LEGO to win a case against knock-offs in Chinese courts (they've now won multiple such cases), or get the police to intervene at all! Now, the mantra is just that Lepin will rebrand or another company will buy their operations off them and pick up the slack.

    One or the other seems to be what's happening with "NUOGAO", unless it's just a rebrand of already produced product that manufacturers/distributors are desperately trying to unload so that they won't have contraband on their hands when the police come knocking. But that doesn't diminish that this WAS a victory, and that stuff cynics have said would never happen IS now happening.
    LyichirM1J0EVorpalRyustluxFizyxBaby_Yoda
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,396
    All Lepin does is make inferior parts and copy other peoples hard work.
    I don't disagree that they copy other people's work, but I am not so sure about the inferior parts. LEGOs reputation (at least amongst AFOLs) has been hit somewhat with poor quality parts recently. The inferior thing about Lepin parts is that they do not have LEGO written on them. Other than that, the quality is very similar from what I have seen.
    pharmjodRecce
  • nhyonenhyone Member Posts: 145
    edited May 2
    Aanchir said:
    Now, the mantra is just that Lepin will rebrand or another company will buy their operations off them and pick up the slack.
    Lepin is not fully taken out. But whether they can come back is in doubt -- the raid is very lethal.

    Even if they do, they will not be able to continue as before. They can keep their name, but not their logo. They won't be able to use the same box art. They won't be able to copy sets as-is. There is no more gray area after last October's ruling.

    I doubt the NuoGao news. Rebranding has been brought up since last October.
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,771
    edited May 2
    CCC said:
    All Lepin does is make inferior parts and copy other peoples hard work.
    I don't disagree that they copy other people's work, but I am not so sure about the inferior parts. LEGOs reputation (at least amongst AFOLs) has been hit somewhat with poor quality parts recently. The inferior thing about Lepin parts is that they do not have LEGO written on them. Other than that, the quality is very similar from what I have seen.
    I've heard a lot more worrying accounts. Brickset's Lepin Super Star Destroyer review called attention to various issues including grimy/dirty bricks, conspicuous molding marks, short shots, etc. I've also heard that early Lepin sets in particular had terribly poor quality for transparent parts, which tended to look very cloudy.
    This review also shows some terribly shoddy microfig printing and blatantly poor color matching between stickers and bricks, while this one shows several faulty functional elements including some frighteningly defective electrical bits (e.g. motors that heat up and emit a burning smell after about 10 minutes of use).
    While LEGO has their own issues with off-register printing, imperfect color matching between bricks and/or stickers, and molding defects, they're rarely anywhere near as frequent and blatant as I see in Lepin reviews, and certainly not to the point that a hobby knife, dremel, superglue, or the disassembly of pre-assembled electronics are needed to make them function as intended.
    Either Lepin quality would have to vastly improve or LEGO quality would have to plummet a long way for Lepin's quality to credibly be considered equal or superior.
    FizyxBumblepantsLyichirpxchris
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,396
    I have only every seen three Lepin sets in real life (and none are mine) and all were fine.

    Seeing as you have mentioned that review, it is probably worth copying and pasting the first couple of paragraphs from the conclusion. While there quality control may be poor - allowing some bad parts in - the majority of the parts appear to be fine.

    I was surprised to find that most of Lepin's parts were very high quality – certainly better than any other clone brand I am familiar with. On a few occasions, I honestly forgot that it was not real LEGO I was piecing together. However, there were several exceptions which detracted greatly from the building experience, and from Lepin in general.

    Lepin's overall quality control is evidently poor, with sealed bags containing dirty parts, malformed parts, parts with weak clutch, and one large part was missing entirely. These flaws are relatively unheard of with LEGO.



    pharmjodRecce
  • datsunrobbiedatsunrobbie West Haven , CTMember Posts: 1,431
    ^That's the problem with redacted versions of reports.
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,339
    ^^Are you sure it wasn't a review of the infamous SSD that was in a fire? ;)
  • gantaratgantarat bangkok,thailandMember Posts: 35
    I mean why police not go raid mother/parent company too ?
    If they claim it's criminal gang operation.

  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,396
    gantarat said:
    I mean why police not go raid mother/parent company too ?
    If they claim it's criminal gang operation.

    Yes, it is strange use of the word gang. This is a company breaking the law. Would they use the word gang to describe other companies that are law breaking?
  • VorpalRyuVorpalRyu AustraliaMember Posts: 2,208
    ^ Could be a company owned & operated by a crime syndicate, back in the late '90's outlaw motorcycle clubs owned & operated most the nightclubs, pubs & strip clubs in Adelaide. The MSM here back in those days often referred to those establishments as being connected to outlaw gang operations.
  • Gibbo1959Gibbo1959 Northumbria UKMember Posts: 255
    ^ As a fan of Orwell, I always remember from 1984 the concept of controlling/adjusting the language in order to control the actual ability of people to formalize their thoughts and to manage propaganda.
    Using the word 'gang' suggests they have busted some dodgy back room operation rather than closing down (temporarily) (part of) what was previously a totally 'legitimate' (in their eyes) Chinese business corporation, merrily copying and selling 'Western' products. I suspect this change of heart from the authorities has only come about as a result of the huge investment by TLG in the country.
    pharmjodBOBJACK_JACKBOBM1J0E
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,396
    VorpalRyu said:
    ^ Could be a company owned & operated by a crime syndicate, back in the late '90's outlaw motorcycle clubs owned & operated most the nightclubs, pubs & strip clubs in Adelaide. The MSM here back in those days often referred to those establishments as being connected to outlaw gang operations.
    I totally believe gangs would run fairly small businesses, especially seedier ones. But this is a company, and from what I can tell part of a fairly hierarchical structure, running a reasonably large operation producing toy bricks for the middle classes.
  • gantaratgantarat bangkok,thailandMember Posts: 35
    Guangdong Loongon is a big china toy company.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guangdong_Loongon

    Their Factory.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blOvsuhnsHA

    It's would destroy china's economy i,guess ?

  • MugenPowerMugenPower Member Posts: 441
    Also consider that the word "gang" could've come from poor translation from the original article...
    AstrobricksBaby_YodaAanchir
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,771
    gantarat said:
    I mean why police not go raid mother/parent company too ?
    If they claim it's criminal gang operation.
    If I had to guess? Because in any sort of criminal investigation, it's easier to start at the bottom before figuring out how high things go.
    A CEO or board of directors of a massive company like that could easily claim that the branding decisions of a particular subsidiary were the responsibility of somebody further down the chain of command and not something they were personally involved in, weakening the case against them.
    But by starting with people who CAN more easily be implicated, investigators can get testimony that might implicate some of their higher-ups. Plus, raiding an actual manufacturing facility makes it easier for the police to obtain substantive physical evidence of counterfeiting, whereas a police raid of a major corporate office might take much longer to turn up any sort of smoking-gun evidence.
    LyichirBaby_Yodadmcc0gmonkey76
  • nhyonenhyone Member Posts: 145
    gantarat said:
    I mean why police not go raid mother/parent company too ?
    If they claim it's criminal gang operation.

    The police smashed the "criminal gang" behind Lepin.

    Before that, they were legitimate businessmen.
  • AndyPolAndyPol UKMember Posts: 354
    Let's hope this continues, but I'm sure as soon as one "factory" is closed, another one will simply open up elsewhere.

    Another problem is that we all agree (the majority) here that what LEPIN do is wrong and we wish LEGO all the best in combating these companies.

    However, when cash strapped parents around the world, who know no different think they are getting a great deal on something that looks the same as LEGO, at a fraction of the price, then LEPIN and others will always have customers.

    It's also such a complicated process to target the gangs / criminals / businessmen (put here whatever description you want) that it will take time, money and effort, just to try and keep pace with them, let alone get ahead of the game and smash it.

    I wish LEGO luck and really hope they succeed, I'm just realistic about the prospects.
  • CyberdragonCyberdragon Maryland, U.S.AMember Posts: 368
    They should make it illegal to sell Lepin and go after the stores. Eliminating sales points (fines + destroy stock) and scaring away potential sellers will definitely help choke their cash flow and make it harder to recover from busts.
  • gantaratgantarat bangkok,thailandMember Posts: 35
    edited May 6
    Aanchir said:
    If I had to guess? Because in any sort of criminal investigation, it's easier to start at the bottom before figuring out how high things go.
    A CEO or board of directors of a massive company like that could easily claim that the branding decisions of a particular subsidiary were the responsibility of somebody further down the chain of command and not something they were personally involved in, weakening the case against them.
    But by starting with people who CAN more easily be implicated, investigators can get testimony that might implicate some of their higher-ups. Plus, raiding an actual manufacturing facility makes it easier for the police to obtain substantive physical evidence of counterfeiting, whereas a police raid of a major corporate office might take much longer to turn up any sort of smoking-gun evidence.
    Problem is will they do that ?
    AndyPol said:
    Let's hope this continues, but I'm sure as soon as one "factory" is closed, another one will simply open up elsewhere.

    Another problem is that we all agree (the majority) here that what LEPIN do is wrong and we wish LEGO all the best in combating these companies.

    However, when cash strapped parents around the world, who know no different think they are getting a great deal on something that looks the same as LEGO, at a fraction of the price, then LEPIN and others will always have customers.

    It's also such a complicated process to target the gangs / criminals / businessmen (put here whatever description you want) that it will take time, money and effort, just to try and keep pace with them, let alone get ahead of the game and smash it.

    I wish LEGO luck and really hope they succeed, I'm just realistic about the prospects.
    Fake Lego customers is Asian that Lego cost double compare to US price (Import Tax)
    If Lepin down they will go buy another fake brand instend let alone buy the real lego which didn't match their income 

    lepin is sale everywhere In thai (Thank to MCU) but DKSH (distributor of Lego in thai) didn't do anything about it.
  • nexandernexander Glasgow Member Posts: 871
    I don't think that lepin is actually that well known in the UK outside afols.  Beyond the odd gumtree/marketplace/eBay sale their won't be much exposure.  The spate of dodgy stores advertising on Facebook were straight fraud, not copies.  Not that Facebook considers them fraud but that's another story.

    The biggest issue I see in the UK atm is knockoff figs.  I repeatedly see stalls at comic cons etc with a few standard original sets on the back then 100's of knockoff figs at the front.  They don't advertise them as Lego, they use the sets to do that for them.  There is a local person to me who sell Mini displays with real bricks but obviously fake  figs, .  Even calls themselves a 'Lego artist'.  I'm looking forward to them to try and get a stall to sell at one of our events. They will be told in a not very polite fashion to bugger off.
    bandit778stluxdmcc0FizyxAanchirChromide
  • PolyphemusPolyphemus Sydney, AustraliaMember Posts: 87
    ^ Yeah, that’s the thing that bothers me the most too. I get that there are struggling families out there who can't always afford genuine LEGO and there's nothing wrong with alternative brands producing their own ideas but the existence of knock-off brands that directly copy existing LEGO sets opens up the possibility of dodgy resellers deliberately deceiving well meaning but unenlightened genuine LEGO customers. Not every LEGO fan spends as much time on forums as we do.
    Baby_YodaAanchir
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,396
    They should make it illegal to sell Lepin and go after the stores.
    Who should, and where? If these was a Chinese court decision, then they can only go after Chinese stores. If stores are located elsewhere, then they cannot do anything except for stopping the production.

    nexander said:

    The biggest issue I see in the UK atm is knockoff figs. 
    Yeah, it has been for a long time. I think that most figures at boot sales, pop-up type stores, and conventions from sellers with large stocks are knock-off ones. There is one seller at a car boot sale near me that sells them for as much as the genuine thing. Whenever my kids look at his stuff, I always say don't buy them they are fake in a loud voice, but people standing next to us still buy them.
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,339
    Will the US tariffs on imported Chinese goods have any effect on counterfeit items? 
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,396
    I doubt it. Don't most get imported in small quantities to avoid any taxation. When I buy clone figures I normally do them in batches of about $5 worth.
    Pitfall69
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,339
    ^Did you change your avatar?
    Jern92SumoLegogmonkey76VorpalRyu
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,771
    AndyPol said:
    Let's hope this continues, but I'm sure as soon as one "factory" is closed, another one will simply open up elsewhere.

    Another problem is that we all agree (the majority) here that what LEPIN do is wrong and we wish LEGO all the best in combating these companies.

    However, when cash strapped parents around the world, who know no different think they are getting a great deal on something that looks the same as LEGO, at a fraction of the price, then LEPIN and others will always have customers.

    It's also such a complicated process to target the gangs / criminals / businessmen (put here whatever description you want) that it will take time, money and effort, just to try and keep pace with them, let alone get ahead of the game and smash it.

    I wish LEGO luck and really hope they succeed, I'm just realistic about the prospects.
    It's pretty much a given that counterfeiting will never stop being a problem. However, the aim of LEGO's (or any company's) legal efforts against counterfeiters is to TREAT the disease, not to cure it.
    By holding copycat brands accountable when possible, it discourages them from growing or multiplying unchecked, and reinforces LEGO's legal claim to their IPs. In some cases, not making any effort to defend your trademarks can mean relinquishing your legal right to them.
    That's why creators of fan works often get hit with cease-and-desist letters if their works too closely resemble another company's protected IP, even if they're not a major competitor or threat from a financial standpoint. A company letting those sorts of violations slide can come back to bite them later on if a competitor uses them as evidence that such-and-such a trademark has been genericized and should be considered public domain.
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,601
    Jern92 said:
    Pitfall69 said:
    ^Did you change your avatar?
    It's the Lepin version of @CCC
    I find it jarring.
    pharmjodVorpalRyuSprinkleOtterBumblepants
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,339
    SumoLego said:
    Jern92 said:
    Pitfall69 said:
    ^Did you change your avatar?
    It's the Lepin version of @CCC
    I find it jarring.
    This is a setup...I just know it
    pharmjodVorpalRyuAstrobricksSprinkleOtterCyberdragonSumoLegoBumblepants
  • CyberdragonCyberdragon Maryland, U.S.AMember Posts: 368
    Pitfall69 said:
    SumoLego said:
    Jern92 said:
    Pitfall69 said:
    ^Did you change your avatar?
    It's the Lepin version of @CCC
    I find it jarring.
    This is a setup...I just know it
    No...this is Jarring...

    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/PG710-Star-Wars-Jar-Jar-Binks-Desert-Skiff-Escape-Action-Figure-Building-Blocks-Model-Best-Education/32821351726.html
    pxchrisSumoLegoJern92Baby_Yoda
  • Diamondback_SixDiamondback_Six USAMember Posts: 75
    Perhaps another tack that might help would be for hotly-demanded classic sets and themes that LEGO never intends to make again, maybe do some Licensed Property of their own and *license* a third-party firm that meets approved quality standards, kind of "if you can't beat 'em buy 'em."

    Basic Market Economics, as long as there's a demand there'll be somebody to supply it, so why not manage that supply and make a few bucks off it? To be frank, if Lepin reissued the entire '89 Classic Pirates line, I'd be mighty tempted...
    daewoo
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,339
    Pitfall69 said:
    SumoLego said:
    Jern92 said:
    Pitfall69 said:
    ^Did you change your avatar?
    It's the Lepin version of @CCC
    I find it jarring.
    This is a setup...I just know it
    No...this is Jarring...

    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/PG710-Star-Wars-Jar-Jar-Binks-Desert-Skiff-Escape-Action-Figure-Building-Blocks-Model-Best-Education/32821351726.html
    This must have been a deleted scene. 
  • daewoodaewoo TexasMember Posts: 280
    Perhaps another tack that might help would be for hotly-demanded classic sets and themes that LEGO never intends to make again, maybe do some Licensed Property of their own and *license* a third-party firm that meets approved quality standards, kind of "if you can't beat 'em buy 'em."

    Basic Market Economics, as long as there's a demand there'll be somebody to supply it, so why not manage that supply and make a few bucks off it? To be frank, if Lepin reissued the entire '89 Classic Pirates line, I'd be mighty tempted...
    There was obviously some demand because they did sell, but a lot of that was because of the (for a while) ridiculously low prices.  If they are having to pay a license fee to Lego, and therefore charge more to recoup that cost, would there still be sufficient demand?   
  • BobflipBobflip Member Posts: 462
    daewoo said:
    Perhaps another tack that might help would be for hotly-demanded classic sets and themes that LEGO never intends to make again, maybe do some Licensed Property of their own and *license* a third-party firm that meets approved quality standards, kind of "if you can't beat 'em buy 'em."

    Basic Market Economics, as long as there's a demand there'll be somebody to supply it, so why not manage that supply and make a few bucks off it? To be frank, if Lepin reissued the entire '89 Classic Pirates line, I'd be mighty tempted...
    There was obviously some demand because they did sell, but a lot of that was because of the (for a while) ridiculously low prices.  If they are having to pay a license fee to Lego, and therefore charge more to recoup that cost, would there still be sufficient demand?   
    Interesting thought... I suspect the demand would drop a little, but for the deleted and sought after sets, even being able to get them at original RRP would be tempting for customers - it may even become more tempting as some people don't want to touch bootleg products. The tricky part is how much would it affect LEGO's sales of new sets, and that may be a thing that puts them off.
  • CyberdragonCyberdragon Maryland, U.S.AMember Posts: 368
    Bobflip said:
    daewoo said:
    Perhaps another tack that might help would be for hotly-demanded classic sets and themes that LEGO never intends to make again, maybe do some Licensed Property of their own and *license* a third-party firm that meets approved quality standards, kind of "if you can't beat 'em buy 'em."

    Basic Market Economics, as long as there's a demand there'll be somebody to supply it, so why not manage that supply and make a few bucks off it? To be frank, if Lepin reissued the entire '89 Classic Pirates line, I'd be mighty tempted...
    There was obviously some demand because they did sell, but a lot of that was because of the (for a while) ridiculously low prices.  If they are having to pay a license fee to Lego, and therefore charge more to recoup that cost, would there still be sufficient demand?   
    Interesting thought... I suspect the demand would drop a little, but for the deleted and sought after sets, even being able to get them at original RRP would be tempting for customers - it may even become more tempting as some people don't want to touch bootleg products. The tricky part is how much would it affect LEGO's sales of new sets, and that may be a thing that puts them off.
    If people are in the market for vintage sets, they don't want the new sets. There's a grey area between normal consumers who only buy new stuff and aftermarket collectors (who aren't making Lego any profit anyway) where people might want vintage sets but don't want to pay aftermarket price and will settle for a copy of an old set at RRP (plus inflation depending on age) as long as it is of decent quality. Now there might be some parents who are not very toy-inclined that might see an obviously old looking set and think it's a new product but for the most part people, even non-lego fans, would likely be put-off by the old fashoned looking stuff in favor of the new and shiny stuff (assuming they kept the pakaging authentic to a point).The problem would be if they started slapping stuff like "exclusive" or whatnot on the box (even when not original IP) and "shinying" it up that soccer moms and dads might start getting suckered in, which might put them back in dodgey land. This could repel the collectors but it would be a small market anyway, so they'd be back the their dirty tricks.
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,771
    There are a lot of reasons that I think partnering with a company like Lepin to manufacture older sets would be a bad idea…
    • Considering that these are companies with an established reputation for trying to cut costs by using stolen IP, I wouldn't be surprised if they are also cutting costs in other areas — possibly areas like exploitative labor practices, workplace health and safety risks, product safety defects, and so on that could bring negative PR and even legal or financial penalties down on the LEGO Group if they partnered with these companies.

      This is not a hypothetical concern — back in 2011, there was a pretty big news story about a Chinese publishing company that was exploiting their workers in some pretty nasty ways and published books under license from various companies, including LEGO.

      And honestly, the fact that Shanghai police cracked down on a Lepin factory makes me wonder whether they might have been on the police's radar for other suspected criminal activity besides IP theft…

    • There's no reason to think that Lepin and other bootleggers like them have some supernatural manufacturing skills or abilities that more legitimate manufacturers (like those that LEGO partnered with for the production of many parts before they had their own manufacturing plant in China) would not.

      In fact, based on the seemingly small capacity of the factory that got raided, it sounds as though their plants are considerably smaller and less state-of-the-art than LEGO's own plant they spent so much money on developing in Jiaxing. So if LEGO is lacking for production capacity, it's not as though there are no more sophisticated and less sketchy manufacturing partners they could turn to.

    • At the same time — if LEGO did start exploring such options to expand their manufacturing capacity, there's no reason to think that fans of discontinued sets and themes are the biggest untapped market out there or the highest priority for what that increased manufacturing capacity ought to go towards.

      Remember, the reason Lepin was copying existing, highly sought after LEGO sets (including retired and current sets alike) is that it's cheaper to steal someone else's designs than to create original ones. But LEGO isn't nearly so averse to spending money to design entirely NEW products when they see a market their current products aren't reaching.

      And if I had to make a guess about what LEGO biggest untapped potential markets are? It's not people who collect product lines like Modular Buildings and Star Wars UCS and Modular Buildings, but have run out of current products to buy and are looking to throw down more money on filling out their back catalog.

      Nor is it people who crave long-defunct product lines like Classic Space or Classic Castle, but have no current themes that interest them the same way. Rather, their biggest untapped markets are probably actual kids like those who account for most toy sales, but in parts of the world where LEGO isn't widely available, or in demographics that have been looking for something in the toy that they never felt LEGO was able to offer.

      So if LEGO ends up obtaining more production capacity, I imagine they'd use it to expand into those markets they've never managed to get a strong foothold in — like they have been doing with girls by launching themes like LEGO Friends/Elves/Disney, or with the East Asian market with some their expanded manufacturing and distribution in China — before they worry about pandering to people who already have a deep passion for LEGO, but aren't satisfied with choosing between current products or waiting for new products to be announced.
    M1J0EBaby_YodaBumblepantsstluxLyichir
  • Baby_YodaBaby_Yoda The world's backsideMember Posts: 1,135
    ^ And it's not like Lego never do remakes, they're just very particular and wise about it. They see how popular #10179 is on the aftermarket and instead of thinking, "The people want #10179," they realise, "The people want a UCS Falcon." Hence the release of #75192, which is, from all reports, superior to its predecessor.
    AanchirLyichir
  • Diamondback_SixDiamondback_Six USAMember Posts: 75
    The other thing is, licensing brings leverage, the ability to impose certain standards like quality-control and working conditions.

    However, whether you're Apple or a teeny tiny shop like my clients that have manufacturing, you really have to keep on top of things with Chinese manufacturing, because as soon as they think they can cut a corner, pull a fast one or loosen tolerances on you they will. And oh by the way, don't forget a lot of their manufacturing is slave-labor plants owned by the PLA and staffed for free by political prisoners...
  • PolyphemusPolyphemus Sydney, AustraliaMember Posts: 87
    ^ I know a guy who owns a small guitar parts company based in Melbourne. About 15 years ago they decided to expand the business to include a line of cheap Chinese made student guitars. They sent their top luthier over to China to setup a factory and oversee the initial run of guitars. Once he was satisfied he came back home. Almost immediately they started noticing changes to specifications, parts being substituted, corners being cut, etc. To this day he still has to head over there every so often to crack the whip and get everything back to spec once the quality starts to slide again. I think he's got it down to once every year or two now but for a while he was spending almost half his time over there!

    I think with increasing exposure to global markets the manufacturing is slowly getting better over there... with the emphasis on slowly...
    pharmjodpxchris
  • gantaratgantarat bangkok,thailandMember Posts: 35
    edited May 18
    It's spoil but this brand do FAT THOR !!!


  • dmcc0dmcc0 Nae far fae AberdeenMember Posts: 635
    Mods, can we put this ^ in a spoiler tag please? @Huw @drdavewatford
    Baby_Yoda
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,601
    dmcc0 said:
    Mods, can we put this ^ in a spoiler tag please? @Huw @drdavewatford
    At this point, is there anyone who hasn't seen Endgame?  It's been three weeks since the International release.
    Jern92
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,339
    ^My wife and kids haven't...lol
    gmonkey76Baby_YodaSumoLegoJern92dmcc0
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,396
    Is that Thor? I thought it was a really bad custom of His Dudeness.
    Pitfall69pharmjodBaby_Yoda
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,339
    CCC said:
    Is that Thor? I thought it was a really bad custom of His Dudeness.
    That Thor is violating several trademarks :)
    SumoLego
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,601
    I find the Coca-Cola can to be curious in its incorrect precision.
    stluxBaby_Yodadaewoodmcc0
  • dmcc0dmcc0 Nae far fae AberdeenMember Posts: 635
    SumoLego said:
    dmcc0 said:
    Mods, can we put this ^ in a spoiler tag please? @Huw @drdavewatford
    At this point, is there anyone who hasn't seen Endgame?  It's been three weeks since the International release.
    Maybe, but I think when it's still in theatres it's probably sensible to at least warn of potential spoilers.  Incidentally, I do know someone that hasn't watched Infinity War yet because he wanted to wait so he could watch it back to back with Endgame!  Not sure if he has seen either yet. (and no idea if he managed to somehow avoid Infinity War Spoilers up until now.) 
  • datsunrobbiedatsunrobbie West Haven , CTMember Posts: 1,431
    edited May 20
    SumoLego said:
    dmcc0 said:
    Mods, can we put this ^ in a spoiler tag please? @Huw @drdavewatford
    At this point, is there anyone who hasn't seen Endgame?  It's been three weeks since the International release.
    I have not seen it, but maybe I'm the only person waiting for it to come out on Blu-Ray. But I'm not bothered by spoilers, since it is my choice to wait.
    SumoLego
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,601
    Well, don't hold your breath for a Coca-Cola can.  I don't want you to be disappointed.

    And Darth Vader is Luke Skywalker's father.
    BumblepantsPitfall69dmcc0
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