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How To Remove Nail Polish From Lego.

MaddinBricksMaddinBricks CanandaMember Posts: 21
I recently bought some second hand Lego. While sorting through it I came across a couple of pieces that were covered in dried nail polish. I don't want to rune the finish on the bricks by using Nail Polish remover. Any suggestions?

Comments

  • HuwHuw Brickset Towers, Hampshire, UKAdministrator Posts: 6,334
    Probably easiest to throw then away and buy replacements at BrickLink, unless they are particularly rare.
    gmonkey76SprinkleOtter
  • MaddinBricksMaddinBricks CanandaMember Posts: 21
    edited March 18
    These are the pieces that are covered in the polish. I would really like to save as many pieces as possable.
  • MaddinBricksMaddinBricks CanandaMember Posts: 21
    Any ideas would help.
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 9,172
    You can try a few different things, like nail polish remover, or maybe CRL, but it may damage the brick or take a lot of elbow grease to remove the polish. With slopes it is more difficult because of the rough finish to those, you will either not get all the polish, or you will buff them down to a shine
    Like @Huw posted above, may be best to buy replacements off of bricklink, unless they are rare..
    gmonkey76
  • oldtodd33oldtodd33 Denver 4800 miles to BillundMember Posts: 2,356
    I will also add the same, those bricks are ruined, throw them out and buy new or used from Bricklink. 
  • AstrobricksAstrobricks Minnesota, USMember Posts: 2,061
    edited March 18
    You wouldn’t be out much at least trying nail polish remover. I just wouldn’t expect a great result.

    By the way, how are things up in Cananda?
    BrainsluggedMuftak1
  • CyberdragonCyberdragon Maryland, U.S.AMember Posts: 357
    Google recommends amyl-acetate and dish soap (not mixed!). Other weird suggestions are tape and olive oil.
  • MaddinBricksMaddinBricks CanandaMember Posts: 21

    By the way, how are things up in Cananda?
    Things are finally warming up here.

    Thanks for the all the suggestions. I will try a couple.
  • AstrobricksAstrobricks Minnesota, USMember Posts: 2,061
    edited March 18

    By the way, how are things up in Cananda?
    Things are finally warming up here.

    Thanks for the all the suggestions. I will try a couple.
    I assume it’s near Canada? ;-)
  • MaddinBricksMaddinBricks CanandaMember Posts: 21
    nope... not yet
  • DedgeckoDedgecko Seattle, WAMember Posts: 799
    You are fighting chemistry here. Most nail polishes are designed to chemically bond to the surface they are applied to. In order to disrupt that bond other chemicals would be applied unless you wanted to physically abrade the material off (pick at it, or use a very fine sand paper). The problem with using a chemical process is that ABS plastics (LEGO Bricks) also react to the same chemicals and lose their structural bond. You’ll get marred surfaces no matter the method of removal.

    You’d likely be best off with very light hand sanding. 
    SumoLego
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,346
    edited March 19
    MrJackson said:
    Seriously, no one has jumped on the obvious TLM quote?
    Low-hanging fruit, my friend.  Low-hanging fruit...

    Dedgecko said:
    You are fighting chemistry here.
    You can't fight chemistry!  It's like runnin' against the wind.  Although, that's physics.  So it's like running against acetone wind.  You'll lose.
    mak0137SprinkleOtterBumblepantsgmonkey76PeteMMuftak1Pitfall69
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,224
    ^I fought chemistry and chemistry won. Chemistry also killed the radio star and shot the sheriff ,but it didn't kill the deputy.
    SprinkleOtterSumoLegoBumblepantsgmonkey76pxchrisMuftak1HugeYellowBrick
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,346
    edited March 19
    Pitfall69 said:
    ...and shot the sheriff ,but it didn't kill the deputy.
    No, that was the one-armed man.  On the night the lights went out in Georgia.

    I knew if I mentioned low-hanging fruit, you'd appear.
    dmcc0gmonkey76pxchrisSwitchfoot55Muftak1Pitfall69
  • PolyphemusPolyphemus Sydney, AustraliaMember Posts: 73
    That's disgraceful. Someone has clearly let children play with that LEGO...
    pxchrisMuftak1
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,204
    Just use acetone or something like ethyl acetate. The damage has already been done to the surface anyway. Most nail varnishes contain volatile solvents like ethyl acetate, it is what keeps the varnish liquid in the bottle and why it dries up if you leave the lid off. A couple of drops, then rub on a cloth. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat again. Probably a few more repeats. And another repeat. Finally you will have a clean brick with a shiny, damaged surface. You can buff it back to a matte surface with a either fine sandpaper or use a little carborundum (400-600 grade) in a few drops of water, but this will end up too matte.

    Or chuck them away and buy new pieces.

    oldtodd33SumoLegoPitfall69
  • CyberdragonCyberdragon Maryland, U.S.AMember Posts: 357
    That's disgraceful. Someone has clearly let children play with that LEGO...
    That's disgraceful, someone let their [genderless child] play with nail polish!
  • MaddinBricksMaddinBricks CanandaMember Posts: 21
    edited March 19
    Do you think that Gasoline might work as an abrasive without damaging the bricks? 
  • HuwHuw Brickset Towers, Hampshire, UKAdministrator Posts: 6,334
    edited March 19
    Petrol is a good solvent so may well help but I think you're wasting your time. They'll never be be back to a usable condition. Everyone has said as much but you won't have it :)


    SumoLegoSprinkleOtterAstrobricksdmcc0Bumblepantspharmjod
  • MaddinBricksMaddinBricks CanandaMember Posts: 21
    Huw said:
    Petrol is a good solvent so may well help but I think you're wasting your time. They'll never be be back to a usable condition. Everyone has said as much but you won't have it :)


    I would like to say I tried. I just cant stand the thought of chucking away good pieces if I can help it. If it all goes wrong then I will through them out.
  • Switchfoot55Switchfoot55 The Northwest, USAMember Posts: 1,358
    edited March 19
    ...of chucking away good piece...
    I think this is the main thrust of the "throw them away" recommendations. Not sure they could be classified as "good" any longer?

    Not to seem like I'm piling on. I've had a difficult time throwing out pieces from bulk lots before as well. 
    MaddinBricksAstrobricksstluxSumoLego
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,700
    I know it's hard, but you've already wasted more time than those parts are worth asking about it...
    Astrobricks
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,204
    You don't need to throw them away. You can either scrape / remove the paint with solvent then use them as test pieces to learn customisation. You can scruff them up a bit to look like worn bricks if you ever need those. You can dissolve them in minimal acetone and use the liquid as LEGO colour matched paint for customising other parts.

    Switchfoot55
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