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UCS MF math problems

legoleppylegoleppy MarylandMember Posts: 71
I am a 5th grade teacher and recently built the UCS MF.  My students know I love Lego and SW so I was thinking of doing a special math lesson on May 4th.  I kept track of my building times for each set of bags and wrote a few problems based on that.  Does anyone have any ideas of other problems that I can have my kids solve?
FizyxThe_RancorMr_Crossricecakestlux

Comments

  • FizyxFizyx ColoradoMember Posts: 761
    Could be an interesting perimeter problem if you're doing any basic geometry.  Could be kind of fun to do area and volume too, but much more difficult.  Could also have them do something like finding the average number of parts per page or step of instructions, or average parts per bag (although this would be super fiddly as they would have to count parts step by step in the instructions themselves.)  Maybe you could do some stuff with the parts distribution as well (finding how many of each kind of piece there are on average kind of thing.)  I know there's some good ones in there, although for 5th graders a bunch of my suggestions are probably duds :)
    Mr_Crossstlux
  • LusiferSamLusiferSam MontanaMember Posts: 477
    I know these are 5th graders, but how complicated do you want these problems to be?  Things I'm thinking about are how many micro or mini figure scaled Falcons could fit in the UCS Falcon.  There's an average of X elements per bag, what is the deviation from the average for each bag?  Estimate the number of studs on the top of the completed model.  Estimate the number of studs in the whole model.  Percentages of different elements or colors in the whole model.  The total length of all of the 2x4 (or pick your favorite element) laid out end to end.  The number of UCS Falcon boxes it would take to fill your class room.

    I've got others, but let me know if these are too simple, too hard or not right.
    Mr_CrossFizyxstlux
  • Mr_CrossMr_Cross East Anglia (UK)Member Posts: 991
    edited April 2018
    Just ideas... haven't done the maths.

    Less about the LEGO:
    If Han Solo can do the Kessel Run in 12 parsecs (approx 30 trillion kilometres) how many times would you have to cross the United States from NY to San Fran (approx 4700km) and how long would it take you if you flew (approx 6.5hrs each flight)? How many 75192 end to end would stretch that far?

    OR

    More about the LEGO:
    The Millennium Falcon uses 7500 LEGO pieces in 23 different colours, if the colours were distributed evenly across all the parts, how many parts of each colour would there be? If half were given over to two shades of grey and the rest were evenly distributed what would the average number of parts in the other colours be?

    Maybe? Good luck, sounds like a lot more fun than I remember my Maths lessons being!


    FizyxstluxFowlerBricks
  • carnage717carnage717 U.S.AMember Posts: 166
    What about a scale problem, scale of lego falcon to a full size version
  • legoleppylegoleppy MarylandMember Posts: 71
    Great ideas!  Thanks and keep them coming!

    @fizyx I like this average number of parts per page or step of instructions.  I squared off the MF to do volume not sure how to do area.
    @LusiferSam --going to use how many micro will it take to build the UCS
    @Mr_Cross -- Going to use your first one



    Mr_Cross
  • FizyxFizyx ColoradoMember Posts: 761
    legoleppy said:
    Great ideas!  Thanks and keep them coming!

    @fizyx I like this average number of parts per page or step of instructions.  I squared off the MF to do volume not sure how to do area.
    @LusiferSam --going to use how many micro will it take to build the UCS
    @Mr_Cross -- Going to use your first one



    To do the area, you could do two different ways:  Area of just like a top-down view, or surface area.  Surface area would be hard, since there's a lot of irregular surfaces even eliminating the greebling, although you could definitely do a lesson about how SA is similar to area, but more parts.  The reason I like using perimeter+area+surface area+volume is because it can kick off some really interesting discussions into dimensional and the properties of different dimensions and how properties morph as you increase dimensions. (IE perimeter of a 2d object morphs into surface area of a 3d object, so a 1 dimensional measure on a 2d object, a line segment, morphs into a 2 dimensional measure on a 3d object.)
  • ecmo47ecmo47 North CarolinaMember Posts: 2,086
    Weight problems? each bag? total over all?
  • legoleppylegoleppy MarylandMember Posts: 71
    ecmo47 said:
    Weight problems? each bag? total over all?
    I thought of that and emailed Lego and they couldn't tell me how many pieces per bag or bag sets or the total weight without the boxing. 
  • M_BossM_Boss Houston, TexasMember Posts: 235
    edited April 2018
    Since you have the time it took you, you could have the 5th graders figure out the average time between each time you added a piece (x hours to build/# parts), and the follow it up giving them a different set part count and telling them to find the number of hours would take at the same pace.

    Edit: Reread and saw that you already did time problems, oops, but maybe this is still new
  • jmeninnojmeninno The Batcave (MA)Member Posts: 704
    How many rewards dollars they would get for purchasing the set on a regular day vs. 2x points day.  Or price with sales tax.  If they painted this many fences at $5 an hour, how many hours would they have to work to afford the set.  Might be fun questions to answer, and also maybe start to get them thinking a little bit about the real world.
  • FauchFauch FranceMember Posts: 2,281
    not about the MF, but you could ask questions about some advanced building technics, there is interesting maths and geometry involved to make it all work.
    Fizyx
  • 77ncaachamps77ncaachamps Aspiring Time Traveler Stuck in the West (US)Member Posts: 2,439
    edited April 2018
    1) Weights/Measures = Average weight of a lego piece in a built MF
    2) Area = What's the estimated area of the MF (superimpose on grid paper)
    3) Fractions = Express the colors of the MF as a simplified fraction
    4) Money = Price per piece (decimals are a big 5th grade math standard)
    5) If you were going to change the MF by adding a new room, etc., design the room and calculate the cost using 1-5 Bricklink sellers.
    6) Create a line plot of the most recent eBay auction ending prices (provide it for them or they can research it)
    7) Create a poll based on MF. Poll at least 30 students. Create a graph (bar, circle, etc.).
    8) You want to break the MF apart and split it among you and four other friends. Describe how you will go about doing so and what each person will get.
    Fizyx
  • VorpalRyuVorpalRyu AustraliaMember Posts: 2,245
    Not sure what level of education in mathematics is done in US at a 5 grade level, so I'm sure if my suggestion would be on the mark, above it or below it, but here goes:

    • As a percentage what are the five most used & least used parts (excluding parts used to build the minifigures), if you need to make it more difficult, do the breakdown by part including colour.
    • Based on my first suggestion, work out the percentage of weight/mass of the set these components contribute to the build.
    • Based on exchange rates & Lego [email protected] prices, which countries are getting the best/worst prices for the set (countries you could compare: Canada, UK, Denmark, Australia, New Zealand, Japan).
    xiahna
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,706
    How many burgers do I have to flip to buy this?


    VorpalRyupharmjod77ncaachamps1265dmcc0
  • BrainsluggedBrainslugged England (the grim North)Member Posts: 820
    How about: Which is the better deal?

    A) £52 for four Star Wars battlepacks with four free DJ polybags and 1% cash back vouchers from Tesco.
    B) £58 for four Star Wars battlepacks and two CMFs with free Scarif Trooper polybag, free Darth Vader pod, free minifigure factory and 5% VIP points.
    C) £26 plus £26 for two sets of two battlepacks with two (total) free Scarif Troopers and 5% VIP points.

    If you have an answer, let me know as that's the conundrum I faced on Saturday. Think I made the wrong choice as I love the Scariff troopers but didn't maximise those.
     
    Fizyx77ncaachampsToc13
  • legoleppylegoleppy MarylandMember Posts: 71
    jmeninno said:
    How many rewards dollars they would get for purchasing the set on a regular day vs. 2x points day.  Or price with sales tax.  If they painted this many fences at $5 an hour, how many hours would they have to work to afford the set.  Might be fun questions to answer, and also maybe start to get them thinking a little bit about the real world.
    I've added all of these, they are great!  
  • MrJacksonMrJackson Member Posts: 316
    Tell your students that you need to build a coffee table display for the Falcon. Plywood comes in 4'x8' boards and dimensional lumber at various lengths. Keeping in mind that a 2"x4" board is actually 1.5"x3.5", what is the most efficient and cost-effective way to design a coffee table?  At dimensions of 33"x22"x8", what lengths of dimensional lumber will you need for legs and the corners, assuming you leave space for glass?  Have them sketch out their designs.  Might be a good project for pairs; I wouldn't go more than 3 to a group for something like this. 

    @LusiferSam having just gotten done PSSA Math tests this week at work, I can tell you that the 5th grade math portion is heavily weighted toward abstract problems like this.  Which, while it can be tough to do under a time limit and pressure to do well on the test, is honestly a better way of assessing students' knowledge than simply regurgitating facts and formulas.  I do appreciate the drive to get students thinking about practical applications, especially when they say "I'll never use this." Well, actually you will. It's like nail guns and routers; they sit idle until you need the nail gun to punch trim in, or are making a display coffee table for the MilF like I am planning and need to cut grooves in wood for glass to rest, which you need a router for.  Then you're glad you have them cause they make life much, much easier.  Same with math facts, and really, everything you learn in school. 

    @legoleppy god bless you teaching 5th grade.  I teach 4th and 5th grade band and I have nothing but the utmost respect for classroom teachers (my wife teaches HS math so I'm trying to up my math game).  It's funny, earlier this morning I picked up my percussionists and started talking about the differences between Spanish and Portuguese in South America and the etymology of words and development of language over the years.  This is the same class that I jumped in and spent several minutes explaining how seasons are caused by the angle of Earth's tilt, rather than the distance from the sun.  One of my drummers looks at me and says "Why do you teach band if you're so smart? You're always talking about stuff like this." I know he meant it as a compliment but it was a good opportunity to address how you can say something and mean it one way but it could be interpreted totally different.
  • legoleppylegoleppy MarylandMember Posts: 71
    MrJackson said:
    Tell your students that you need to build a coffee table display for the Falcon. Plywood comes in 4'x8' boards and dimensional lumber at various lengths. Keeping in mind that a 2"x4" board is actually 1.5"x3.5", what is the most efficient and cost-effective way to design a coffee table?  At dimensions of 33"x22"x8", what lengths of dimensional lumber will you need for legs and the corners, assuming you leave space for glass?  Have them sketch out their designs.  Might be a good project for pairs; I wouldn't go more than 3 to a group for something like this. 

    @LusiferSam having just gotten done PSSA Math tests this week at work, I can tell you that the 5th grade math portion is heavily weighted toward abstract problems like this.  Which, while it can be tough to do under a time limit and pressure to do well on the test, is honestly a better way of assessing students' knowledge than simply regurgitating facts and formulas.  I do appreciate the drive to get students thinking about practical applications, especially when they say "I'll never use this." Well, actually you will. It's like nail guns and routers; they sit idle until you need the nail gun to punch trim in, or are making a display coffee table for the MilF like I am planning and need to cut grooves in wood for glass to rest, which you need a router for.  Then you're glad you have them cause they make life much, much easier.  Same with math facts, and really, everything you learn in school. 

    @legoleppy god bless you teaching 5th grade.  I teach 4th and 5th grade band and I have nothing but the utmost respect for classroom teachers (my wife teaches HS math so I'm trying to up my math game).  It's funny, earlier this morning I picked up my percussionists and started talking about the differences between Spanish and Portuguese in South America and the etymology of words and development of language over the years.  This is the same class that I jumped in and spent several minutes explaining how seasons are caused by the angle of Earth's tilt, rather than the distance from the sun.  One of my drummers looks at me and says "Why do you teach band if you're so smart? You're always talking about stuff like this." I know he meant it as a compliment but it was a good opportunity to address how you can say something and mean it one way but it could be interpreted totally different.
    I really like your ideas!  I might also cost of wood too.  Especially the table because I need one!  And funny you should mention the seasons as I am teaching space now in science and we talked about the Earth on its' axis causes the seasons.  If people are interested I can post my tasks when I am finished.  I had lots of time today to work on it and it's coming along nicely including photos.
  • FauchFauch FranceMember Posts: 2,281
    and the elliptic orbit of the earth around the sun.
  • Baby_YodaBaby_Yoda The world's backsideMember Posts: 1,214
    MrJackson said:
    making a display coffee table for the MilF
    Please don't put it this way when you explain the task to the fifth-graders.
  • TheOriginalSimonBTheOriginalSimonB Felixstowe Member Posts: 1,290
    This falcon cost x for x1 pieces. Previous falcons cost a for a1 pieces, b for b1 and so on. What's the best combination of previous sets to get the same number of parts?
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