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Predictions on Discontinuing Sets and their Secondary Market Value

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Comments

  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 13,252
    I think there will be a modest bump, and a slow, steady increase in value.  I would model it after the SSD.  Although my guess is that it tops out at $650.00 NISB.
  • stevemackstevemack 1567km Drive From BillundMember Posts: 919
    I don’t see it having the same following as the SSD has
    PapaBeargmonkey76
  • samiam391samiam391 A log cabin in PA, United StatesMember Posts: 4,348
    PapaBear said:
    nhyone said:
    I sold my last 10179 eight months back when the rumors first came out for $2,100. That's how you play this game, and an interesting market.
    I bet that guy who bought the MF off you didn't see it that way. :-)

    He is now out $1+k that he could have used to buy the new MF plus a few more giant sets.
    I would say 10179 is still worth around $1,500 new.  It is going for over $2,000 on eBay.  The fact that Lego doesn't have any of 75192 in stock kept it sort of high for now.  Ppl rushed to sell theirs in a panic and that's why prices got to $1000.  I think it will even out around $1,500 when stock of 75192 comes in.  Of course, it will start climbing as soon as the new one gets discontinued.....
    .... in 10 years.
    FollowsCloselySumoLego
  • RennyRenny USAMember Posts: 1,145
    I agree with @samiam391. With Lego releasing new versions of big, exclusive sets the climb to top dollar amounts will be a slow, gradual one (aside from the initial spike).
  • FollowsCloselyFollowsClosely Member Posts: 1,004
    ^ Even the initial spike is not so impressive.
  • Farmer_JohnFarmer_John USA - 4,035 Miles from 62 West Wallaby St., Wigan, Lancashire, UKMember Posts: 2,404
    edited October 2017
    PapaBear said:
    I would say 10179 is still worth around $1,500 new.  It is going for over $2,000 on eBay.  The fact that Lego doesn't have any of 75192 in stock kept it sort of high for now.  Ppl rushed to sell theirs in a panic and that's why prices got to $1000.  I think it will even out around $1,500 when stock of 75192 comes in.  Of course, it will start climbing as soon as the new one gets discontinued.
    I can't see #10179 being worth $1,500 with a new, updated, and more detailed version being available from TLG for a measly $800. The new set is more streamlined than the old blocky set. A person almost gets two of the newer version for the price of an old version at $1,500. I guess it's just a matter of taste (and practical money management).
    dougts
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 13,252
    And there is scarcity, as well.  Ultimately, there will be far more of the new sets available.  Collectors tend to gravitate to lower production sets...
    Fireheart
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,113
    SumoLego said:
    And there is scarcity, as well.  Ultimately, there will be far more of the new sets available.  Collectors tend to gravitate to lower production sets...
    I'm not sure how this one will pan out.

    If you could only have one in your collection, do you go for the older, rarer, slightly inferior version or the newer, more common, slightly better version with money over to spend on other SW sets?

    SumoLegoFarmer_John
  • FireheartFireheart Suffolk, UKMember Posts: 611
    ^ A collector will want each version.. A MISB 10179 will hold its value long term.. and I agree as per @SumoLego comment above, it’s all about the rarity value as well. Not just what a AFOL wants to own..
    I bet by the time 75192 retires, the 10179 MISB will be worth alot more than a 75192 MISB..
    SumoLegoFollowsCloselygmonkey76
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 13,252
    edited October 2017
    CCC said:
    If you could only have one in your collection, do you go for the older, rarer, slightly inferior version or the newer, more common, slightly better version with money over to spend on other SW sets?
    As with anything, it depends on what the others sets are, and their relative value.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,113
    Fireheart said:
    ^ A collector will want each version.. A MISB 10179 will hold its value long term.. and I agree as per @SumoLego comment above, it’s all about the rarity value as well. Not just what a AFOL wants to own..
    I bet by the time 75192 retires, the 10179 MISB will be worth alot more than a 75192 MISB..
    What an AFOL wants to own also influences supply though. Any 10179's that are owned by someone that wants a (as in any) UCS MF, are likely to make it to market now, since they can sell up and buy a slightly better version for significantly less than they sell the old one for. So supply of the old one can go up. Demand will also drop as AFOLS wanting any version leave the pool of people that are after the 10179.

    I'm sure individual sets of 10179 will always be more valuable than individual sets of 75192. But I imagine the volumes of 75192 sold on the aftermarket once retired will be significantly higher.
    dougts
  • CaptainPirateManCaptainPirateMan MichiganMember Posts: 345
    I gotta say, this MF reissue makes me wonder if other sought after sets, like the IFS could be coming as well. I think the modulars might be safe, they can just keep making new ones. But at this point, some sort of IFS remake wouldn't shock me. As well as minifigs like Mr. Gold getting another release.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,113
    I gotta say, this MF reissue makes me wonder if other sought after sets, like the IFS could be coming as well. I think the modulars might be safe, they can just keep making new ones. But at this point, some sort of IFS remake wouldn't shock me. As well as minifigs like Mr. Gold getting another release.
    It wouldn't surprise me at all if other big SW sets are remade, as there is a market for those and they sell at high prices, which makes remakes worthwhile. Plus the UCS MF has been received very positively (even though a remake) and got reasonable news coverage.

    Whereas Mr Gold, I'm not so sure. There is a market for him, of course. But what would lots of people be willing to pay for him? It won't be multiple £100s like the original Mr Gold. Maybe £6, like they have done with the Lester figure. And no doubt they are making money on him, so it would be profitable. But if they wanted to use the exclusive chase minifigure idea again, then they would probably best avoid re-releasing him. It is not even that nice a figure. People seem to want him as he is rare, not really for the figure itself.

  • CaptainPirateManCaptainPirateMan MichiganMember Posts: 345
    I personally would love to get my hands on an IFS reissue. Even though I don't collect SW, it seems like this MF might be a "testing the waters" kinda thing. Same with Lester appearing all of the sudden. As many of us have said, Lepin only exists because people want Lego sets that Lego doesn't make anymore. So if Lego does a reissue of some of the sought after sets every now and then, it'll help keep interest up imo. 

    Like I said earlier, I think the modulars might be safe. But I could see IFS, Statue of Liberty, Eiffel Tower and other sets like these getting "reimagined" now.
  • LyichirLyichir United StatesMember Posts: 875
    I gotta say, this MF reissue makes me wonder if other sought after sets, like the IFS could be coming as well. I think the modulars might be safe, they can just keep making new ones. But at this point, some sort of IFS remake wouldn't shock me. As well as minifigs like Mr. Gold getting another release.
    I doubt it. The big difference is that the Millennium Falcon is one of the single most recognizable and well-known Star Wars ships, yet the UCS version was not available for long and is ten years old.

    Compared to that, there's very little that an unlicensed set like the Imperial Flagship would offer that a newly designed ship couldn't—and a new ship would appeal to both the people who don't have the IFS and the people who already do.

    Same probably applies to Mr. Gold. Sure, only a select few people wound up getting one of those—but why bother rereleasing the same fig, which by now has been copied by a number of bootleggers, when you could make a new one (say, a Ms. Gold, for instance) to create the same sort of demand all over again?
    BumblepantsdougtscatwranglerstluxSumoLegoBuriedinBricksLuLegosnowhitie
  • MrJacksonMrJackson Member Posts: 403


    Like I said earlier, I think the modulars might be safe. But I could see IFS, Statue of Liberty, Eiffel Tower and other sets like these getting "reimagined" now.
    Especially with sand green being back in vogue. (Now lets hope for the return of 1x2 grooved bricks). The MF proved there's a market for an $800 set. And the waiting list for it is closed. Most of the customers who come in and ogle the Falcon end up nodding in understanding when I tell them the part count and then the price. I'd be curious and excited to see updated versions of those old exclusives with modern pieces and techniques. 
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,885
    Lyichir said:
    I gotta say, this MF reissue makes me wonder if other sought after sets, like the IFS could be coming as well. I think the modulars might be safe, they can just keep making new ones. But at this point, some sort of IFS remake wouldn't shock me. As well as minifigs like Mr. Gold getting another release.
    I doubt it. The big difference is that the Millennium Falcon is one of the single most recognizable and well-known Star Wars ships, yet the UCS version was not available for long and is ten years old.

    Compared to that, there's very little that an unlicensed set like the Imperial Flagship would offer that a newly designed ship couldn't—and a new ship would appeal to both the people who don't have the IFS and the people who already do.

    Same probably applies to Mr. Gold. Sure, only a select few people wound up getting one of those—but why bother rereleasing the same fig, which by now has been copied by a number of bootleggers, when you could make a new one (say, a Ms. Gold, for instance) to create the same sort of demand all over again?
    Also, Imperial Flagship isn't quite as impressive today as it was when it was new. Don't get me wrong, its size is still pretty outstanding, but its level of detail and complexity of build are a bit lacking compared to later ships like #70618, #70810, and #71042. Back then, even having Technic rigging and hinged SNOT surfaces to fill out the bow were enough to set it apart from other LEGO ships, but since then the bar has been raised.

    Also worth considering: when Imperial Flagship came out, although it wasn't branded as a Pirates set, it was able to capitalize on residual interest in the previous year's Pirates wave, the same way Medieval Market Village capitalized on residual interest in Fantasy-Era Castle and Kingdoms Joust capitalized on residual interest in Kingdoms. So while the idea of LEGO revisiting the idea of a big imperial frigate is pretty plausible, whenever it does happen it's most likely to be in that sort of context (as a follow-up to a larger retail wave), rather than in a total vacuum of other Pirates products.

    Like I said earlier, I think the modulars might be safe. But I could see IFS, Statue of Liberty, Eiffel Tower and other sets like these getting "reimagined" now.
    Interesting point about Statue of Liberty and Eiffel Tower. It's definitely been long enough since those sets that a re-release could probably hold its own. Though, I wonder, with there being as few Creator Expert/Advanced Models landmark sets as there are, would the next one be more likely to be a re-release of something there's already been, or something new? It's not quite like the UCS or Winter Village sets where there's one or more new landmark sets every year. But on the other hand, there is sort of a question of how many world landmarks are really globally iconic and well-regarded enough to make good Creator Expert sets.
    catwrangler
  • CaptainPirateManCaptainPirateMan MichiganMember Posts: 345
    edited October 2017
    I agree that seeing a DIRECT reissue of the IFS are slim. But I could see a new large Red or Blue coat ship being released that bares the name "Imperial Flagship". Lego clearly has no problem using that name or the name "Bounty" again and again. So yes, compared to the other sets I mentioned, we probably won't see THAT specific ship again, but a new and improved one IS likely imo. Especially since there is a pretty significant market for "pirate" ships imo. 
  • PapaBearPapaBear East CoastMember Posts: 462
    edited October 2017
    LEGO has already rereleased updated UCS versions of the X-wing, Snowspeeder, Sandcrawler, and now the Falcon.  I think the main thing that sets the Falcon apart from the other ones is that it looks so similar to the old one, just more pieces and detail.  The others are total redesigns.  The Force Awakens came out 2 years ago.  Yet LEGO still has only released UCS OT vehicles.  It seems they are bound to continue rereleasing OT Star Wars.  I have heard a lot of ppl speculate on rereleases coming and I bet they will release redesigned sets similar to IF, Eiffel Tower, Statue of Liberty, and Emerald Night, but they may be so different that they might as well be new sets.

    SumoLego said:
    I think there will be a modest bump, and a slow, steady increase in value.  I would model it after the SSD.  Although my guess is that it tops out at $650.00 NISB.
    I knew SSD would do great.  I also thought the Sandcrawler would do great.  I'm just not too confident with the Helicarrier.  If the Tumbler is only at $300 right now, idk if Helicarrier is worth it.  Course, if enough people think like this, the set could be worthwhile.

    As many of us have said, Lepin only exists because people want Lego sets that Lego doesn't make anymore.
    I would just like to point out, I think Lepin exists primarily because Asia is a much bigger market than America and Europe combined could ever dream of being.  Although, they certainly do capitalize on discontinued sets because there will always be high demand for many of those sets.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,113
    I agree that seeing a DIRECT reissue of the IFS are slim. But I could see a new large Red or Blue coat ship being released that bares the name "Imperial Flagship". Lego clearly has no problem using that name or the name "Bounty" again and again. So yes, compared to the other sets I mentioned, we probably won't see THAT specific ship again, but a new and improved one IS likely imo. Especially since there is a pretty significant market for "pirate" ships imo. 
    I'd love an all new Imperial Flagship. And you are right about the name, it can easily be reused and hardly anyone will care. There would be no point in reissuing the same old one, as noted above, new techniques would make the detail much better on a ship of the same size (and the price higher!)
  • CaptainPirateManCaptainPirateMan MichiganMember Posts: 345
    ^^I agree. Lepin and other knockoffs DO seem to help give those areas access to bricks. Even though Lego is over there as well, they seem to be out of the price range of a lot of people in that part of the world. So besides AFOL'S, Lepin's primary target is the people of Asia.
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 13,252
    edited October 2017
    jcb193 said:
    As many have mentioned, Lego makes no money off the secondary market.....
    Correcto!
    jcb193 said:
    Try doing that with your 1998 Topps Ryan Leaf Rookie Card :)
    That card is only useful if you roll it up and snort cocaine with it.  Laced with irony...

    piratemania7gmonkey76madforLEGOsnowhitie
  • PapaBearPapaBear East CoastMember Posts: 462
    jcb193 said:
    As many have mentioned, Lego makes no money off the secondary market.....that is unless they start to reissue what's hot in the secondary market.
    TLG makes no money directly, but they certainly benefit from the aftermarket.  They get the initial sale of the set saved for the aftermarket.  The high prices adds to the perception that LEGO is a valuable product.  Having enough sets in resellers hands keeps exorbitant prices down enough, so people can purchase sets they miss.  Keeping prices reasonable enough reduces customer service complaints to TLG.  Having resellers and retailers keep stock after EOL helps TLG by allowing them to move on and not reserve warehouse space and money for something they clearly "make no money off" of.
    ryjaydatsunrobbieecmo47
  • ryjayryjay Member Posts: 1,001
    All the sets for sale in the secondary market were once purchased in the primary, Lego benefited from all those sales.  As well as all the people who purchased set in the primary because they felt the set would increase in value over years is doing so because of the price the secondary market set....they may never resell them, but they purchased because they believe they increase in value.  And it doesnt need to be a major percent of sales, either.

    Cars were often, and still are, purchase based on resale value in the secondary market.  Car makers benefit from this...heck, sale people even use that as a selling feature when trying to make a sale at the dealership, yet receive no money off of the resale.




    PapaBearmadforLEGO
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 9,860
    The only thing LEGO may benefit from in the secondary market is more visibility and maybe more profits due to the rubes that keep thinking/being told that LEGO will make them a million dollars if they just stack sets at retail prices.
    However, I doubt LEGO is making decisions based on the secondary market.
  • nhyonenhyone Member Posts: 145
    edited October 2017
    A buys a set from TLG for $100. B buys it from him for $200 in the secondary market. A then buys another set from TLG again for $100 to repeat the cycle.

    I'm sure TLG would rather get the whole $200 from B.
  • PapaBearPapaBear East CoastMember Posts: 462
    TLG could surely get the whole $200 from B as long as they sell sets indefinitely and at some point double the price on the $100 set.
    sid3windr
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,113
    nhyone said:
    A buys a set from TLG for $100. B buys it from him for $200 in the secondary market. A then buys another set from TLG again for $100 to repeat the cycle.

    I'm sure TLG would rather get the whole $200 from B.
    So long as B was able to purchase during the retail lifetime of the product (and they are not all purchased by resellers to corner the market), I doubt lego actually care whether they get the money from A or B.

    Why is B buying it at such a mark-up? It is because LEGO are not selling to him (at retail price), and this could be that (i) the product is retired or (ii) it is current but they have location restrictions on the sale or (iii) it is current but out of stock at retail. All three of these are down to faults by LEGO.

    sid3windr
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,113
    ryjay said:

    Cars were often, and still are, purchase based on resale value in the secondary market.  Car makers benefit from this...heck, sale people even use that as a selling feature when trying to make a sale at the dealership, yet receive no money off of the resale.

    Yes, that is the argument that you pay a premium for this brand, as it has great resale value down the line. While LEGO may not actually state this, they know it is true and is probably one of the reasons they charge such high prices.
    dougts
  • HanzoHanzo VAMember Posts: 607
    edited October 2017
    It was my understanding Lego publicly dislikes resellers, even to the point of banning them from ordering on [email protected]  That not true? 
  • littlepuppilittlepuppi Member Posts: 181
    If their sales keep dropping maybe they will feel the love again!
    PapaBearexciter1
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,113
    Hanzo said:
    It was my understanding Lego publicly dislikes resellers, even to the point of banning them from ordering on [email protected]  That not true? 
    I don't think they have publicly banned anyone, it tends to be private. And no, I don't think they do dislike resellers. They dislike some resellers, the ones that tend to buy large amounts of current stock to profit from it at certain pinch points such as Xmas (as in the minecraft saga), when they get complaints that current sets are not available but are on ebay. I don't think they care about resellers of stock they are wanting to get rid of at the end of its retail life.
    dougts
  • exciter1exciter1 Member Posts: 226
    The only thing LEGO may benefit from in the secondary market is more visibility and maybe more profits due to the rubes that keep thinking/being told that LEGO will make them a million dollars if they just stack sets at retail prices.
    However, I doubt LEGO is making decisions based on the secondary market.
    Lego benefits from the secondary market when sellers buy up their stock and hold it or flip for profit.  If sellers don't want to buy up their stock anymore because LEGO is worthless in the aftermarket, then they lose a large portion of their customer base and it's a downward spiral from here.  LEGO's sales will continue to decline as resellers look for other more profitable products.

    Lego continues to not recognize this and thought that a crackdown on resellers, more product, more themes, and more mediocre offerings would somehow help their bottom line.
    PapaBearjuggles7
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,885
    CCC said:
    Hanzo said:
    It was my understanding Lego publicly dislikes resellers, even to the point of banning them from ordering on [email protected]  That not true? 
    I don't think they have publicly banned anyone, it tends to be private. And no, I don't think they do dislike resellers. They dislike some resellers, the ones that tend to buy large amounts of current stock to profit from it at certain pinch points such as Xmas (as in the minecraft saga), when they get complaints that current sets are not available but are on ebay. I don't think they care about resellers of stock they are wanting to get rid of at the end of its retail life.
    This is the point I often try to make. There's a big difference between hating resellers and taking steps to keep them from causing the company problems. Talking about whether LEGO likes or dislikes resellers makes it sound like the company has personal reasons for how they treat resellers rather than financial ones. If a car dealer puts up one of those plastic owl statues to keep birds from crapping all over their cars, that doesn't mean they hate birds, it just means that they want to keep their cars clean.
    snowhitie
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,113
    exciter1 said:
    Lego benefits from the secondary market when sellers buy up their stock and hold it or flip for profit.
    Actually, LEGO don't benefit from the secondary market if a reseller buys up all the stock and then flips it, if that stock would have sold anyway (and if a reseller is able to flip it, then it would have sold to other customers). Thsi was pretty much what happened in the Minecraft episode five years ago, which brought in a lot of their current policies that are now termed anti-reseller.

    LEGO don't benefit, since they make the same money if it was sold to resellers or to the eventual buyers  (so neutral here). However, LEGO also gets lots of negative complaints that their stock is not available direct from them, but is available at a large mark-up online on eBay and similar. This is exactly the point about different types of resellers. Ones that try to buy out current sets that are still being advertised by LEGO and quick flip them are damaging, even though LEGO makes the same money from them as they do if they sold direct to the eventual buyer. That is why purchase limits are strongly monitored through [email protected]
    datsunrobbiecatwranglermadforLEGO
  • YodaliciousYodalicious DagobahMember Posts: 1,366
    LEGO benefits from the secondary market because...brand awareness. Good, bad or indifferent LEGO’s already outstanding brand awareness only increases because there is a secondary market. Whether they get $100 twice from A or $200 once from B doesn’t matter so much to them. What matters is that their products live on well beyond their shelf life, thus keeping brand awareness high. LEGO doesn’t have to do all that brand work themselves...the secondary market does some of it for them by turning a toy into a true collectible.
    PapaBear
  • datsunrobbiedatsunrobbie West Haven , CTMember Posts: 1,583
    LEGO benefits from the secondary market because...brand awareness. Good, bad or indifferent LEGO’s already outstanding brand awareness only increases because there is a secondary market. Whether they get $100 twice from A or $200 once from B doesn’t matter so much to them. What matters is that their products live on well beyond their shelf life, thus keeping brand awareness high. LEGO doesn’t have to do all that brand work themselves...the secondary market does some of it for them by turning a toy into a true collectible.
    The secondary market is a double-edged sword. One edge is the resellers, who make it possible for someone who missed a set at retail to purchase it when the set is no longer available on the primary market. The other edge is the scalpers, who attempt to buy ALL the retail stock, forcing people who want it to either pay over retail or do without. B may decide that the $100 set is not worth $200, and instead spend their money elsewhere. LEGO got their $100 from A and now B is spending all their money on Playmobil and Hot Wheels because they got frustrated with not being able to buy Lego sets at MSRP.
  • YodaliciousYodalicious DagobahMember Posts: 1,366
    ^ If B is even considering paying over retail for a retired/hard-to-find LEGO set, there’s a decent chance he’ll be buying LEGO from somewhere at some point. Not a lot of people are saying “I really want that “hard-to-get” LEGO set, but since I can’t I’ll go with the Hot Wheels.” That internal conversation is likely happening more at the retail level when they can’t find something on the shelf. If the individual is even to the point of trying to seek out something at a premium on the secondary market, then they’re a bigger fan than the average person.

    But that example was not all inclusive...it was simply answering does LEGO want $100 twice from A or $200 once from B. In reality, they want the $200 from both, but if it were truly an either/or situation, then LEGO doesn’t care who it comes from. In fact, it may be better from A because A made two purchases, showing an intent to return to the product.

    Regardless, none of that was my real point. My real point was the brand awareness factor. The secondary market led to those ridiculous “LEGO is worth more than gold!!!” articles, which in turn helps LEGO from a brand perspective.

    LEGO doesn’t suffer from the secondary market. If anything, they currently suffer from an over production issue. So many copies of sets on shelves. Sure the hard-to-finds are still just that...hard to find. But the standard release sets are too plentiful. We’re seeing 80% clearances regularly at Walmarts. I say this living in a large metropolitan area, but even so...just because you’re an unbelievably popular brand, doesn’t mean you’re exempt from overproduction/saturation issues.
    PapaBear
  • legomentallegomental UkMember Posts: 343
    80% off lego on clearance?

    One dreams of such heady heights here!


  • YodaliciousYodalicious DagobahMember Posts: 1,366
    ^ In my area, it seems to be relatively new. Within the last few months at the various Walmarts. A few I was able to snag...Jestro’s Volcanic Lair, The Dragon Forge, The Water Dragon, General Magmar’s Seige, Aaron’s Flyer, nearly all of the Star Wars buildable figures, almost the entire City volcano line, the recent VIP jet/limo set, Lloyd’s dragon (the TV one, not the movie one), the Clayface and Bane sets from TLBM, etc. I hadn’t seen anything greater than 50% off at those same locations until this Summer/Fall.
  • datsunrobbiedatsunrobbie West Haven , CTMember Posts: 1,583
    ^ I'm thinking the lost sales are more likely the casual buyer, like grandparents who are given a list of toys the kids would like for Christmas or birthday gifts. Child has never had a Lego set, but the kids at school are talking about the Saturn V. Child puts the Saturn V at the top of their wish list, followed by various non-Lego options.

    A quick search shows MSRP of $120, but you cannot actually buy the set for less than $180, putting it out of the budget. Kids end up with other toys from their list and have fun with them, so the next time they asked the other toys get higher placement on the list. LEGO got their $120 selling the Saturn V to "A", but missed out on creating a new KFOL because "B" got priced out.

    I totally agree with you about sets lingering until clearance prices help move them off the shelves, but the sales have become so frequent that I suspect many people don't even bother looking at sets on retail shelves when they are at MSRP. I know that when I go looking I check the clearance aisle first, and very, very rarely buy any LEGO (or any other toys) at full MSRP. As far as I know, LEGO gets the same amount of money from Target, Walmart, or Amazon whether I buy the set from them at full price or on clearance.
    Yodaliciouscatwranglermak0137
  • YodaliciousYodalicious DagobahMember Posts: 1,366
    I’m exactly the same. I used to buy certain themes right at release. Now I don’t even do that’s for my favorites. Why would I whenever 20% off (at least) sometimes comes very quick. Many TLBM sets went on a basically permanent 20% off only a couple of weeks after release. And I got several Brickheadz for $5 at Walmart the week after they hit stores. 

    But there is still a huge huge population that doesn’t wait. However, to the point, that percentage constantly goes down.
    catwrangler
  • ArgonautArgonaut LondonMember Posts: 21
    With Lego struggling financially, at least there's no chance of them re-issuing the Taj Mahal (10189).  No logic in them doing a new version or indeed any demand for new.

    This used to be no.2 after the first MF in terms of rarity and value but is now probably no.1.   :)


    shikadi
  • PapaBearPapaBear East CoastMember Posts: 462
    LEGO sales have become less frequent in my area over the years.  I never see anything more than 5% off retail around here.  :(
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,113
    nhyone said:
    A buys a set from TLG for $100. B buys it from him for $200 in the secondary market. A then buys another set from TLG again for $100 to repeat the cycle.

    I'm sure TLG would rather get the whole $200 from B.
    There is also the other scenario when B decides to spend $200 on current products offered by LEGO.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,113
    Argonaut said:
    With Lego struggling financially, at least there's no chance of them re-issuing the Taj Mahal (10189).  No logic in them doing a new version or indeed any demand for new.

    This used to be no.2 after the first MF in terms of rarity and value but is now probably no.1.   :)

    There are quite a few LEGO sets that are rarer than the Taj Mahal.

    And I don't really see the link between their current less than expected sales of things like TLBM sets and the business case for re-issuing a more adult focussed set like a new Taj Mahal.

    The continued out of stock notices on sets like Saturn V and the UCS MF may point them in a direction of making more high end sets aimed at an older age group than what is usually seen as their core customer group of 6-12 year old (mainly) boys.

    We may well see them cutting back on the number of sets issued in a range like NK or TLBM. They could have easily cut each range back by a third and there would still be many sets in each, with plenty of choice for consumers. I doubt many kids get every set in an entire range like TLBM. It also wouldn't surprise me if sales of sets for TLNM are a bit of a flop too (at least, not as good as expected).

  • exciter1exciter1 Member Posts: 226
    Argonaut said:
    With Lego struggling financially, at least there's no chance of them re-issuing the Taj Mahal (10189).  No logic in them doing a new version or indeed any demand for new.

    This used to be no.2 after the first MF in terms of rarity and value but is now probably no.1.   :)


    Oh my, there are rumors swirling right now Taj Mahal might be updated for a release next year.
    FollowsClosely
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,885
    exciter1 said:
    Argonaut said:
    With Lego struggling financially, at least there's no chance of them re-issuing the Taj Mahal (10189).  No logic in them doing a new version or indeed any demand for new.

    This used to be no.2 after the first MF in terms of rarity and value but is now probably no.1.   :)


    Oh my, there are rumors swirling right now Taj Mahal might be updated for a release next year.
    Have those rumors come from any kind of source besides the Blocks Magazine “rumour mill” column? Because after all that nonsense about Nexo Knights ending this year and the summer wave possibly even being cancelled, I can no longer trust that as a source. For all I know they just make this stuff up off the top of their heads to generate buzz. It’s not like when a specific person with a track record for accurate insider information gives us hints at what to expect.

    That said, I don’t think LEGO’s financial slowdown is reason to assume they wouldn’t re-release or redesign a big set like that. That depends more on how particular sets like that are selling, as it would regardless of the company’s overall financial state. After all, the company’s still making way bigger profits and sales than when the original Taj Mahal came out.
    sid3windrcatwrangler
  • prevereprevere North of Bellville, East of Heartlake, South of Bricksburg, West of Ninjago City Member Posts: 2,905
    Frankly, if a rumor like a new UCS MF turns out to be true, I'll take a serious look at almost gossip.
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