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Quality issues / broken parts

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Comments

  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    Istokg said:
    Are LEGO elements for the North/South American market ACTUALLY produced in Mexico?  Or only packaged there?
    Ciénega de Flores moulds parts. Lots of them. It's one of the largest injection moulding plants in Latin America. Arburg installed 100 machines in 2013 alone as the tail-end of larger order. And it's being expanded with more machines this year.

    Your quotes preceded its opening. And, of course, that of Jiaxing, which also has moulding machines. TLG doesn't just mould in Europe.
    Well, it does list Mexico on the boxes as a location components are manufactured.
    That means nothing. Many electronics products are made in China (and some things are only made in China) - but their case is fitted elsewhere just so they can claim to be "Made in XYZ".

    I suspect the list of countries on LEGO sets is actually a list of countries where things might have been made. In other words, a set that lists Mexico might normally have nothing in it from there, but if there are production problems, stock can be shifted around without any further issues.
    stlux
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 14,218
    ^ You are 100% correct.  Given the ubiquitous nature of packaging, and the number of different markets and import/export issues with various countries, it's better to over-disclose, than to make a material omission.
    stlux
  • RecceRecce Tiny Little Red DotMember Posts: 923
    Not sure if this is considered an issue, I've noticed now that the bricks had one "damaged" stud surface out of all the studs on the brick. Not sure from which year onwards they had this. 

    Also, the flat tile surfaces seem to have a visible dot pattern on them. 

    Does this mean the brick quality is getting worse? :(
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    Recce said:
    Does this mean the brick quality is getting worse? :(
    No.

    It just means they've decided to do things differently. The "damaged" stud is where plastic is injected into the mould, and they've decided that it's better on a stud rather than somewhere else.
    stlux
  • dragologerdragologer U.S.AMember Posts: 133
    Brew said:
    @Rainstorm26 No problem. I know I have expressed my opinion about cracking bricks several times and thus seem to be known for it. The funny part is I've only seen a couple of cheese slopes cracked... I too have a lot of sealed sets and have my fingers crossed. I just hope that TLG is seriously working on this problem.
    unfortunately they aren't. i cant say how many times I've called about a cracked piece and frankly they just don't believe me :(
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    Brew said:
    @Rainstorm26 No problem. I know I have expressed my opinion about cracking bricks several times and thus seem to be known for it. The funny part is I've only seen a couple of cheese slopes cracked... I too have a lot of sealed sets and have my fingers crossed. I just hope that TLG is seriously working on this problem.
    unfortunately they aren't. i cant say how many times I've called about a cracked piece and frankly they just don't believe me :(
    What customer services staff know is different from from the company knows. Some influential people read (but almost never comment) the online forums. If there are people here who have not experienced problems but nevertheless believe that they exist, then the company will be aware of those issues too.

    Apart from which, TLG like tracking things and accumulating statistics. You can be sure that they'll have a much better handle than any of us as to whether there are genuine problems.

    There's also the possibility that, by your own suggestion, you've called so many times that they've greylisted you!
    stluxSumoLegoGoldchains
  • GoldchainsGoldchains Member Posts: 795
    So I picked up the Spiderman Bridge Battle Set #76057 at Target on Friday night.  Was building it yesterday, and found one of the large wall pieces Part #4527174 was highly warped on one side.  Definitely a production error that fortunately didn't affect the building.  The wife didn't even realize it when I showed her and thought it was supposed to be that way lol.  

    This is the first time I've had a broken/defective part in a set.  I've only had one set that was missing a part, which was a flat 2x4 plate with no studs on top missing from the Jabba's Palace set.  I've been lucky so far.  
  • FauchFauch FranceMember Posts: 2,551
    still wonder why #4527174 seem easier to say than 1x6x5 panel.
    ricecakeSprinkleOttersid3windr
  • yys4uyys4u USA SoCalMember Posts: 1,092
    So I picked up the Spiderman Bridge Battle Set #76057 at Target on Friday night.  Was building it yesterday, and found one of the large wall pieces Part #4527174 was highly warped on one side.  Definitely a production error that fortunately didn't affect the building.  The wife didn't even realize it when I showed her and thought it was supposed to be that way lol.  

    This is the first time I've had a broken/defective part in a set.  I've only had one set that was missing a part, which was a flat 2x4 plate with no studs on top missing from the Jabba's Palace set.  I've been lucky so far.  
    My issue is with the figures! I've always hated the quality of CMF, battle packs, promo figs etc and always felt assured that anything coming from an actual BOX set would be the quality we are all accustomed to, but there are 2 figures in this set that are not the same quality. I was very disappointed to see this as this sets appeal is largely in part to the figures...
  • BrickDancerBrickDancer Dunes of TatooineMember Posts: 3,639
    ^Which 2 figs though @yys4u?
  • yys4uyys4u USA SoCalMember Posts: 1,092
  • BrickDancerBrickDancer Dunes of TatooineMember Posts: 3,639
    Ouch, the Goblin! What's the difference that you noticed on them? Loose joints, weak clutch?
  • yys4uyys4u USA SoCalMember Posts: 1,092
    For me, the main thing I notice is the lack of the black bar on the neck, that's always a red flag for me.
    Usually the joints are looser, mainly the legs. The print lacks a certain shine.They honestly also feel lighter. The legs on the goblin have that little square on the top that is in the priture, thats another sign I notice. All the CMF's have that, none of the traditional box sets have them. There's a number of signs I look for in figures made in different factories, from the neck, to armpit printing, even little prints on the wrist. But I can always tell a slight quality difference, and I dont like it lol
    BrickDancer
  • BrickDancerBrickDancer Dunes of TatooineMember Posts: 3,639
    Good to know, thanks! I'll keep my eyes peeled for these details too when I crack it open. But yeah it's getting a bit sad on the quality compromising.
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    edited August 2016
    yys4u said:
    For me, the main thing I notice is the lack of the black bar on the neck, that's always a red flag for me.
    Not any more.

    Torsos used to printed and then assembled. For that, the mark on the neck was used to determine which way round the arms were added.

    These days, they're (mostly?) assembled and then printed, which obviously doesn't require the neck mark.
    catwrangler
  • yys4uyys4u USA SoCalMember Posts: 1,092
    @TigerMoth I've heard of that before, however I've never seen a torso without the neck printing compare to one with neck printing. My theory (which honestly has no facts behind it) is that newer factories, say in Mexico or China use newer, cheaper, methods of printing, and thus do no require the neck bar. Where as the figures made in Denmark use the other machines that require the neck bar, and that's why I'm used to that standard of figures. That could explain why all the figures with no neck bar, I personally find lower quality. I've also heard that LEGO has problems getting the right ABS pellets or whatever to factories in China, that's why you'll notice a greenish tint to the yellow figures made from there. 
    If machines don't need the neck bar, why is that 99% of figures that come out of box sets still have them?
  • dragologerdragologer U.S.AMember Posts: 133
    TigerMoth said:
    Brew said:
    @Rainstorm26 No problem. I know I have expressed my opinion about cracking bricks several times and thus seem to be known for it. The funny part is I've only seen a couple of cheese slopes cracked... I too have a lot of sealed sets and have my fingers crossed. I just hope that TLG is seriously working on this problem.
    unfortunately they aren't. i cant say how many times I've called about a cracked piece and frankly they just don't believe me :(
    What customer services staff know is different from from the company knows. Some influential people read (but almost never comment) the online forums. If there are people here who have not experienced problems but nevertheless believe that they exist, then the company will be aware of those issues too.

    Apart from which, TLG like tracking things and accumulating statistics. You can be sure that they'll have a much better handle than any of us as to whether there are genuine problems.

    There's also the possibility that, by your own suggestion, you've called so many times that they've greylisted you!
    you have a very good point but don't pretend you know all the ins and outs of my situation if you don't mind :)
  • BrickDancerBrickDancer Dunes of TatooineMember Posts: 3,639
    edited August 2016
    ^You must clarify the question in order to get a 'correct' answer.
    TigerMoth said:
    These days, they're (mostly?) assembled and then printed, which obviously doesn't require the neck mark.
    How do you define 'these days' exactly? Do you mean it be today, this week, this year or multiple years past?

    Because as yys4u pointed out, most of the figs coming from real sets still have neck bar printing. As examples to support this statement, I present you Nexo Knights (maybe not made today or last week necessarily, but at least within this year of 2016):

    http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItemInv.asp?M=nex025

    Or since we are speaking about Superhero figs specifically, how come all the figs from regular box sets also have neck bar printing? For example I present Ant-man from 2015:

    http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItemInv.asp?M=sh201

    While a Superhero fig like Lightning Lad from the Target Cube set doesn't have neck bar printing?

    http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItemInv.asp?M=sh211

    Could yys4u possibly be correct that it has something to do with sub-par quality from production in China?
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    yys4u said:

    Where as the figures made in Denmark use the other machines that require the neck bar, and that's why I'm used to that standard of figures.
    FWIW, European parts are generally printed and assembled in Kladno.
    That could explain why all the figures with no neck bar, I personally find lower quality.
    You mentioned CMFs. I believe they were subcontracted out for quite some time, and which might explain all sorts of things.
    I've also heard that LEGO has problems getting the right ABS pellets or whatever to factories in China, that's why you'll notice a greenish tint to the yellow figures made from there.
    They used to use coloured ABS from a very specific range from one manufacturer. Now, they colour it themselves and multisource.
    If machines don't need the neck bar, why is that 99% of figures that come out of box sets still have them?
    Probably, as you surmised, because boxed sets for Europe come from Europe (mainly Nyíregyháza) and the parts printed in Kladno "the old way". However, just because assembling a torso first doesn't require a neck bar, it doesn't mean that it can't have one.

    YouTube has quite a few videos from their production lines. Finding them might be fun, but there are videos showing torsos being printed - both with and without arms. Those with arms, don't have a neck band.
  • brumeybrumey AustriaMember Posts: 1,002
    edited August 2016
    i happen to come across these cracks with purchased used lego from around 2001 - 2010.
    old town and castle stuff from 90ies dont has this!
  • DedgeckoDedgecko Seattle, WAMember Posts: 800
    edited January 2017
    That moment while MOCing that you really hate some of LEGO's molding machines


    Is 54200 the part number and xx-xx the location of the part in the mold tool?
  • PatsyWalkerPatsyWalker TorontoMember Posts: 83
    yys4u said:
    For me, the main thing I notice is the lack of the black bar on the neck, that's always a red flag for me.
    Usually the joints are looser, mainly the legs. The print lacks a certain shine.They honestly also feel lighter. The legs on the goblin have that little square on the top that is in the priture, thats another sign I notice. All the CMF's have that, none of the traditional box sets have them. There's a number of signs I look for in figures made in different factories, from the neck, to armpit printing, even little prints on the wrist. But I can always tell a slight quality difference, and I dont like it lol


    Old post, but this discussion piqued me. I checked out a portion of my minifigs. My CMF do all have squares! Never noticed.

    Some oddities I noticed using this post and the ensuing discussion as my guide:

    - In my Ghost Rider Team-Up set, Hobgoblin has the squares on the legs, but does have the neckbar mark.

    - From Jokerland, Batman, Beast Boy, Harley, and Starfire have squares. Starfire and Robin don't have neckbar marks.

    - From the Avengers Avenjet, Hyperion is the sole figure with no neckbar mark.

    - While CMF figures all have squares, LEGO Dimensions figures do not seem to (I have them all but Ninjago and Adventure Time).

    I thought that was interesting that certain parts would come from different factories despite being a needle in the bigger haystack of the part count.

    That said, I can't say that I find the paint to be less quality or that the affected parts feel lighter, looser, or inferior in any way. If they really are, I hope I never notice. I'm already a perfectionist who gets caught up in tiny errors with my Marvel Legends and Star Wars Black Series figures. ;)

  • lcf119lcf119 Arkansas, USAMember Posts: 13
    edited January 2017
    - While CMF figures all have squares, LEGO Dimensions figures do not seem to (I have them all but Ninjago and Adventure Time).


    Dim006 (Chell) does have the squares on the legs (as they are made of the cheaper CMF plastic), but also has the black bar on the neck, with the rest of the figure being made of typical plastic. The figure's hairpiece is also made out of the cheaper CMF plastic, which I find odd. It's the only figure in my collection that I can recall that is a "hybrid" of the cheaper and traditional ABS plastics (scratch that - I do recall that the 2011 Wonder Woman (Sh004), as well as Supergirl (Sh157) had the same thing going on, with cheap plastic legs and the rest of the body in the usual plastic). Interesting thing to note, the damage on the bottom of the torso was already present when I bought the figure, which I also haven't seen before. All the Wyldstyle minifigures that I own (Tlm017, Tlm027, and Tlm099), as well as Carnage (Sh187) having something similar to this, although the assembled torso is made out of the cheaper plastic (and thus, without the black bar on the neck) while the rest of the figure is made out of the regular plastic.
    yys4u
  • PatsyWalkerPatsyWalker TorontoMember Posts: 83
    @lcf119

    You're right, I missed Chell in my run through of my figures!

    Dimensions Supergirl also follows the prior Supergirl model. Mine also has a little nick in the torso to the left of where your Chell's is.

    How can I tell the difference between the plastics? What qualities am I looking for?
  • lcf119lcf119 Arkansas, USAMember Posts: 13
    @lcf119

    How can I tell the difference between the plastics? What qualities am I looking for?
    The cheaper plastics have slightly lighter colours, and are matte. There are differences in the moulds for minifigures made in cheaper plastics. Some were phased out in late 2013, but this will make it easy to identify any minifigures from 2010-2014. All cheap plastic minifigures from 2010-2013 will have unique hand moulds, with numbers (it could be any combination of numbers 0-9, as far as I can tell) moulded onto both sides of the wrist; this was phased out in early 2014 when the quality of cheap plastic minifigure moulds was improved. However, cheap plastic hands produced in 2014 are slightly wider than they should be, making it impossible to connect a stud to the top of the hand. This faulty mould was already being phased out by mid-2014, but was still present until 2015. Arms produced from 2010-2013 also had a different mould; they had a rectangular imprint on the inside of the arms with numbers inside. Cheap plastic arms produced from 2014 onward use the standard mould. Cheap plastic legs still use the same type of mould used since 2010, which have the small square imprints with the pips at the very top. The necks of cheap plastic minifigures also do not have the printed black/white/silver bar on them. Cheap plastic heads from 2014 onward have shorter studs on the head.

    The picture below shows what cheap plastic minifigure parts looked like from 2010-2013. From 2014 onward, the only things that remain the same are the torsos and hands. The large hand in the middle is a (blurry) attempt to display an anomaly on the wrist, a number (in this case, 8).


    MynattarathemisDedgeckostluxricecakeyys4ucatwranglermithridate
  • lcf119lcf119 Arkansas, USAMember Posts: 13
    ^Interestingly, I have found that the switch from arm/hand moulds occurred between the releases of Minifigures Series 10–The LEGO Movie. Prior to Series 11, all cheap plastic minifigures were as shown in the photo above. Series 11 was apparently produced between the transition of moulds, as they are hybrids of the 2010 moulds and the 2013 moulds. The LEGO Movie Series was composed entirely of the new moulds, with the introduction of the 2014 defective hands. A similar thing happened with the defective hands, in which they were (presumably - I don't have any Simpsons figures) also used on Simpsons Series 1 figures, with Series 12 being hybrids of the defective hand moulds with the functional moulds, and Series 13 being the first series to have the current style of cheap plastic minifigures.
  • PatsyWalkerPatsyWalker TorontoMember Posts: 83
    @lcf119

    Thank you so much for that insightful breakdown. I had noticed the numbers on wrists before but never got around to looking into it. The cheap plastic heads having shorter studs was a revelation to me, as I have a few heads from the custom bin at the LEGO shop where certain hairs (especially the long ponytail) never sat tight. Some quick fiddling on my desk minifigs shows me you've explained why.

    I find facts like these fascinating. I'll probably find time this weekend to go through everything with these notes just for the fun of verifying. I got back into LEGO around CMF 9, so that timeline of changes suits my needs perfectly.

    Again, thank you for taking the time to detail it out for me!
  • GallardoLUGallardoLU USAMember Posts: 644
    Dedgecko said:
    That moment while MOCing that you really hate some of LEGO's molding machines


    Is 54200 the part number and xx-xx the location of the part in the mold tool?
    Most likely the xx-xx numbers are Machine number - mold number. this way when a problem occurs with a batch they can quickly identify which machine has the issue, and if the problem is tied to a single mold which mold it is they need to replace/repair/clean.
  • lcf119lcf119 Arkansas, USAMember Posts: 13
    @lcf119

    Thank you so much for that insightful breakdown. I had noticed the numbers on wrists before but never got around to looking into it. The cheap plastic heads having shorter studs was a revelation to me, as I have a few heads from the custom bin at the LEGO shop where certain hairs (especially the long ponytail) never sat tight. Some quick fiddling on my desk minifigs shows me you've explained why.

    I find facts like these fascinating. I'll probably find time this weekend to go through everything with these notes just for the fun of verifying. I got back into LEGO around CMF 9, so that timeline of changes suits my needs perfectly.

    Again, thank you for taking the time to detail it out for me!
    No problem. I'm glad you found it useful; I've been meaning to make a guide like this for a long time.
  • FauchFauch FranceMember Posts: 2,551
    Most likely the xx-xx numbers are Machine number - mold number. this way when a problem occurs with a batch they can quickly identify which machine has the issue, and if the problem is tied to a single mold which mold it is they need to replace/repair/clean.
    when you ask for replacements, they wouldn't ask the numbers of the broken pieces so they can identify their provenance? though I guess a lot of people couldn't be bothered giving them. then again, maybe those wouldn't call anyway.
  • DedgeckoDedgecko Seattle, WAMember Posts: 800
    Yeah, I couldn't tell what set these were from anyways... probably Mixels.
  • willobee498willobee498 CanadalandMember Posts: 349
    Fauch said:
    Most likely the xx-xx numbers are Machine number - mold number. this way when a problem occurs with a batch they can quickly identify which machine has the issue, and if the problem is tied to a single mold which mold it is they need to replace/repair/clean.
    when you ask for replacements, they wouldn't ask the numbers of the broken pieces so they can identify their provenance? though I guess a lot of people couldn't be bothered giving them. then again, maybe those wouldn't call anyway.
    They would use those numbers when doing quality inspections on parts before they make it into sets.
  • mustang69mustang69 North CarolinaMember Posts: 534
    FYI for anyone wondering, I picked up a #10197 Fire Brigade last week on Craigs list and when taking it apart to rebuild (it was partially disassembled anyway) there were a few 1x1 tiles that broke and a couple 1x1 plates. I put in a request for replacements on 3/23 and I just got an email that they are on the way. So it looks like they will replace parts for a retired set, even if it's second hand. Though it probably also has to do with the amount of parts being requested (qty and over all cost).
  • bluedragonbluedragon United StatesMember Posts: 505
    I also had 1x1 tiles break on the FB. Sad to report that over the weekend I noticed 3 broken fingers on the Groot assembly I've had on display away from light for about 2 years . Clips broke on the reddish brown tubes with clip.
  • RecceRecce Tiny Little Red DotMember Posts: 923
    mustang69 said:
    FYI for anyone wondering, I picked up a #10197 Fire Brigade last week on Craigs list and when taking it apart to rebuild (it was partially disassembled anyway) there were a few 1x1 tiles that broke and a couple 1x1 plates. I put in a request for replacements on 3/23 and I just got an email that they are on the way. So it looks like they will replace parts for a retired set, even if it's second hand. Though it probably also has to do with the amount of parts being requested (qty and over all cost).
    Nothing to do with EOL sets, they will send replacement if the parts are still in production, not so with retired molds or parts.
    madforLEGO
  • RecceRecce Tiny Little Red DotMember Posts: 923
    This large plate was in my Kwik-E-Mart set.

    No way to bend it flat, though since it's used as the base with bricks layed on it, doesn't pose to much of a problem in the actual build.


  • RecceRecce Tiny Little Red DotMember Posts: 923
    Another thing I noticed is the difference in quality of the word LEGO imprinted on the stud surfaces.

    Referring to below picture (parts from the same Kwik-E-Mart set), you can clearly see the word on the 2x3 plates are much sharper compared to the 4x4 plates which looked washed out. It looks like the latter is probably using a mold that is near the end of its lifespan.

    Also, I can visually see a difference in the shade of grey between the 2 actual parts, though you might not be able to tell them apart from this image.

    TLG's QC is dropping while at the same time their product pricings kept on increasing.


    MynattClutchPowerKerre
  • datsunrobbiedatsunrobbie West Haven , CTMember Posts: 1,698
    Recce said:
    This large plate was in my Kwik-E-Mart set.

    No way to bend it flat, though since it's used as the base with bricks layed on it, doesn't pose to much of a problem in the actual build.


    I have never tried it, but maybe you can flatten it out by covering with bricks on both sides and applying some heat from a hair dryer? If it was summer I'd suggest leaving it in a sealed car all day to heat it up. 
  • MAGNINOMINISUMBRAMAGNINOMINISUMBRA Member Posts: 993
    Recce said:
    This large plate was in my Kwik-E-Mart set.

    No way to bend it flat, though since it's used as the base with bricks layed on it, doesn't pose to much of a problem in the actual build.


    Pretty sure this can now be used as a stock photo the next time ANYONE (including TLG themselves) wants to argue that there hasn't been a drop in both overall quality and QC over the last decade and a half - this piece was quite obviously released fron the mould to early and managed to make its way through the entire QC system and into the hands of a customer.  You could probably 'flatten' it out with a few different methods but the reality is that the shape you're looking at is the inherent memory of the plate. I wonder how many months/ years before it snaps due to being pushed out of shape? To extrapolate what's occurred here to other elements and it's no suprise whatsoever that everyone's cheese and small tiles are breaking.  
     When "only the best is good enough" really isn't good enough (or for that matter, acceptable) anymore... I'm starting to wonder about the long term integrity of my entire modern collection.
  • vaoinasvaoinas EstoniaMember Posts: 13
    Why don't you just contact Lego and get the new one? 
    I myself have found faulty piece few times in my set and have sent new one immediately by Lego.
    TyresOFlahertyMynatt
  • VorpalRyuVorpalRyu AustraliaMember Posts: 2,318
    vaoinas said:
    Why don't you just contact Lego and get the new one? 
    I myself have found faulty piece few times in my set and have sent new one immediately by Lego.
    I've heard it in a few places now, including here, complain too often or too loudly, TLG may ignore any further requests for missing/damaged/broken parts. That being said, I've had no issues getting replacements for missing parts even for the event exclusives.
    xiahna
  • TyresOFlahertyTyresOFlaherty USAMember Posts: 342
    On my #10187, I noticed several pieces that didn't match, as seen in the images below. TLG was kind and sent me the replacements, the new ones for the door matched, while the one for the trunk/boot was still the wrong color.



    @VorpalRyu I've also had TLG send me an email about suspicions of abuse on my part of the replacement part policy, but I spoke with a customer service agent after receiving that notice and explained that I only send legitimate requests for parts that are broken/wrong, and I have been able to get my pieces as I've needed them since then. The agent I spoke to also said something about how red flags possibly get thrown up when someone sends too many requests in a certain amount of time, so that may have been the problem.
    VorpalRyuMynattcatwranglermadforLEGO
  • VorpalRyuVorpalRyu AustraliaMember Posts: 2,318
    edited March 2017
    @TyresOFlaherty, fair enough, good to know that TLG are willing to discuss the matter & even reverse a ban on individuals requesting replacement parts. When I got my SDCC Marvel Brickheadz sets, the Iron Man/Captain America set was missing a few pieces & the request was my second for an event exclusive (the first was the NYCC Luke's Landspeeder), after all the talk about bans, I was worried I'd be denied. The only issue was one part wasn't available yet, I was told to call back around May/June as there was hold on that part until then.
    TyresOFlahertyxiahna
  • vaoinasvaoinas EstoniaMember Posts: 13
    VorpalRyu said:
    vaoinas said:
    Why don't you just contact Lego and get the new one? 
    I myself have found faulty piece few times in my set and have sent new one immediately by Lego.
    I've heard it in a few places now, including here, complain too often or too loudly, TLG may ignore any further requests for missing/damaged/broken parts. That being said, I've had no issues getting replacements for missing parts even for the event exclusives.
    As I can see it, there are two kind of problems in Lego quality. One is the actual quality of all bricks - colour consistency, parts, that have cracks in them after some use, quality of plastic used etc. all the things Lego should fix to make their product better.

    But finding a warped or broken piece in a new opened box couldn't be totally avoided by Lego, considering millions of pieces Lego produces every day. It's just not the quality issue in general. And there's a perfectly working way to get the replacement, if that happens.
    VorpalRyuTyresOFlahertystlux
  • AstrobricksAstrobricks Minnesota, USMember Posts: 4,492
    ^ Bent plates could happen if the part just sat too long in the box with something resting on it wrong. I once ordered a software book from Amazon that came with a CD-ROM that was bent in a 90 degree angle because it got stuck in an awkward spot.
  • masterX244masterX244 GermanyMember Posts: 530
    ^ and no way for lego to catch cases like that since they happen after box sealing and most probably after leaving their warehouses
  • TheFewTheFew EnglandMember Posts: 1,660


    On my #10187, I noticed several pieces that didn't match, as seen in the images below. TLG was kind and sent me the replacements, the new ones for the door matched, while the one for the trunk/boot was still the wrong color.



    @VorpalRyu I've also had TLG send me an email about suspicions of abuse on my part of the replacement part policy, but I spoke with a customer service agent after receiving that notice and explained that I only send legitimate requests for parts that are broken/wrong, and I have been able to get my pieces as I've needed them since then. The agent I spoke to also said something about how red flags possibly get thrown up when someone sends too many requests in a certain amount of time, so that may have been the problem.


    My VW had similar issues!
    Mynatt
  • VorpalRyuVorpalRyu AustraliaMember Posts: 2,318
    edited April 2017
    From everything that we can figure, I have tetrachromacy, so I see a frakload more colour variances that most of population. This is why I don't bother worrying about colour variances in Lego elements most of the time, as it was I had two Black Widow Brickheadz sets & I had to use the Dark Orange parts from both to build one with minimal colour variance. Unless @xiahna or someone else can see a major colour difference, I wouldn't bother requesting new parts from TLG, otherwise I'd be constantly contacting them for new parts.
    catwranglerxiahnamadforLEGO
  • AstrobricksAstrobricks Minnesota, USMember Posts: 4,492
    ^ Fascinating. I'd never heard of tetrachromacy before, so I just learned something cool! I wonder if there are simple test patterns to check for it.
    madforLEGO
  • MAGNINOMINISUMBRAMAGNINOMINISUMBRA Member Posts: 993
    @VorpalRyu I better never let you see my Volvo Wheel Loader - it would make your poor little tetrachromic eyes bleed. I've got a Dulux colour chart with less shades of yellow.
    MattDawsonGalactusbandit778madforLEGO
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