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Quality issues / broken parts

124678

Comments

  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    nerzhin said:

    I tried to describe the parts since there was no number for them, but they sent me a nexo knight chicken shield instead.
    Aren't the numbers in the back of the instruction booklet?
  • CupIsHalfEmptyCupIsHalfEmpty Member Posts: 545
    nerzhin said:
    CCC said:
    nerzhin said:
    I am very concerned about the quality of Lego right now. They have positioned themselves as a high quality toy, but the cracking bricks thing is out of control. I bought my son the Nexo Fortrex and the Nexo Beast Chariot several weeks ago, and the printed tiles in both magic book pieces have already cracked. They are not available as replacement parts on the Lego site, either.
    I imagine they will appear as time goes on. They are always slow to update when a set is just released.
    Yep I figured. I tried to describe the parts since there was no number for them, but they sent me a nexo knight chicken shield instead. I will say, as long as you have still your instruction booklet and your set is still being made, the Lego company has been fantastic about sending replacements hassle free.They replaced almost the entirety of my dad's Cat and Mouse Creator set. Though that raises the issue of why are they having to replace so many parts in the first place?

    Is it this tile? If so, the part number is 6133120 . I found this on page 54 of the instruction booklet from here: http://cache.lego.com/bigdownloads/buildinginstructions/6150176.pdf 
  • nerzhinnerzhin Member Posts: 22
    TigerMoth said:
    nerzhin said:

    I tried to describe the parts since there was no number for them, but they sent me a nexo knight chicken shield instead.
    Aren't the numbers in the back of the instruction booklet?

    nerzhin said:
    CCC said:
    nerzhin said:
    I am very concerned about the quality of Lego right now. They have positioned themselves as a high quality toy, but the cracking bricks thing is out of control. I bought my son the Nexo Fortrex and the Nexo Beast Chariot several weeks ago, and the printed tiles in both magic book pieces have already cracked. They are not available as replacement parts on the Lego site, either.
    I imagine they will appear as time goes on. They are always slow to update when a set is just released.
    Yep I figured. I tried to describe the parts since there was no number for them, but they sent me a nexo knight chicken shield instead. I will say, as long as you have still your instruction booklet and your set is still being made, the Lego company has been fantastic about sending replacements hassle free.They replaced almost the entirety of my dad's Cat and Mouse Creator set. Though that raises the issue of why are they having to replace so many parts in the first place?

    Is it this tile? If so, the part number is 6133120 . I found this on page 54 of the instruction booklet from here: http://cache.lego.com/bigdownloads/buildinginstructions/6150176.pdf 
    D'oh. Very bone headed of me. I totally forgot about the part numbers in the back. I'll have to see if this one and the one from the Beast Chariot are now available. I wonder if that new magic book part is to blame for the cracking
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    nerzhin said:
    I'll have to see if this one and the one from the Beast Chariot are now available.
    It's worth noting that what's advertised and what's available are two different things - but you might have to jump through a few hoops.
    nerzhinmadforLEGOkiki180703
  • DedgeckoDedgecko Member Posts: 798
    Well TLG will send it to you as soon as it's available.  That said is there anyway I can find out what lot you have to ensure I don't get the same batch?  Is any of that info visible on the outside of the box?
  • nerzhinnerzhin Member Posts: 22
    Dedgecko said:
    Well TLG will send it to you as soon as it's available.  That said is there anyway I can find out what lot you have to ensure I don't get the same batch?  Is any of that info visible on the outside of the box?
    I don't have the boxes for those sets. Not sure if that info would be much help though
  • SumoLegoSumoLego Member Posts: 15,229
    Lego is not without quality issues, but I am skeptical.
    MattsWhatSprinkleOtterkiki180703cheshirecat
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    Dedgecko said:
    That said is there anyway I can find out what lot you have to ensure I don't get the same batch?  Is any of that info visible on the outside of the box?
    In general terms, the batch number is on the box seals.
  • nerzhinnerzhin Member Posts: 22
    SumoLego said:
    Lego is not without quality issues, but I am skeptical.
    I understand. And perhaps it will end up coming down to purely environmental issues. Still, it is too bad to spend the money and have such a great toy begin to break. We just bought the Olaf polybag yesterday so I will be curious to see if it holds up....
  • SumoLegoSumoLego Member Posts: 15,229
    I'll be one happy snowman!
    nerzhinkiki180703
  • MrJ_NYMrJ_NY Member Posts: 592
    Is there also a quality issue with Series 15 CMF/behind the reason they've seem to have vanished from USA. I'm not buying the copyright infringement story about Shark Guy but did see this posted in the front page comments:

    By @Sir If in United States, 02 Mar 2016 23:37

    I went over to check the Lego website and I found this in the reviews:

    "Just one single complaint... Lego seems to be going crazy with the whole "fusing two colors of plastic into a single component" thing. They started with just doing it for Superhero-themed minifigures' boots, but on this guy, they've done it for his chest and shark-head, which leads me to my problem: This technique makes the plastic much easier to crack, as mine did. It's a very small, hardly visible fracture in the shark's nose, but it is still there."

    If this was the issue then why are they still available in UK?

  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Member Posts: 10,788
    MrJ_NY said:
    Is there also a quality issue with Series 15 CMF/behind the reason they've seem to have vanished from USA. I'm not buying the copyright infringement story about Shark Guy but did see this posted in the front page comments:

    By @Sir If in United States, 02 Mar 2016 23:37

    I went over to check the Lego website and I found this in the reviews:

    "Just one single complaint... Lego seems to be going crazy with the whole "fusing two colors of plastic into a single component" thing. They started with just doing it for Superhero-themed minifigures' boots, but on this guy, they've done it for his chest and shark-head, which leads me to my problem: This technique makes the plastic much easier to crack, as mine did. It's a very small, hardly visible fracture in the shark's nose, but it is still there."

    If this was the issue then why are they still available in UK?

    Standard and Quality controls are less than in the US?
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    madforLEGO said:

    Standard and Quality controls are less than in the US?
    Or more? During manufacture.

    There are periodically reports of large-scale cracking. Each time somebody else  comes back and says they've never had any problems. Now, it's probably subjective according to where observers live, but it sometimes seems that more complaints of that nature come from America. There are exceptions, of course, which muddies the waters.

    With that in mind, the question arises whether sets for the American market come from, or through, a different factory, presumably that in Mexico. There have been a variety of suggestions but one is about the humidity in the locations where multiple cracks are found. Perhaps, that's a near-miss. The thing is, that ABS is more susceptible to cracking when the humidity at the time it's manufactured is wrong. Clearly, whilst the conditions across the European factories are similar because they are geographically close, those in Mexico are probably not. That will presumably have been taken into account and adjustments made, but at the end of the day, they're still likely to be different. And that might be the root of the problem.
    DedgeckoMrJ_NYBlueTacocatwranglerkiki180703cheshirecatOmastar
  • DedgeckoDedgecko Member Posts: 798
    Ugh, so I should rip all my shark packs open!?  Grr.
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,779
    edited March 2016
    TigerMoth said:
    madforLEGO said:

    Standard and Quality controls are less than in the US?
    Or more? During manufacture.

    There are periodically reports of large-scale cracking. Each time somebody else  comes back and says they've never had any problems. Now, it's probably subjective according to where observers live, but it sometimes seems that more complaints of that nature come from America. There are exceptions, of course, which muddies the waters.

    With that in mind, the question arises whether sets for the American market come from, or through, a different factory, presumably that in Mexico. There have been a variety of suggestions but one is about the humidity in the locations where multiple cracks are found. Perhaps, that's a near-miss. The thing is, that ABS is more susceptible to cracking when the humidity at the time it's manufactured is wrong. Clearly, whilst the conditions across the European factories are similar because they are geographically close, those in Mexico are probably not. That will presumably have been taken into account and adjustments made, but at the end of the day, they're still likely to be different. And that might be the root of the problem.
    I might buy that, except when I find a houseload of LEGO sets/parts that crack, then it is just that house, and almost every set in that house. Are you telling me that they managed to only buy sets from Mexico, while none of the other twenty or so household managed to never buy a Mexican set, and I haven't either?
    In fact, when I got a pair of new (a few months old or less) sets from a house with almost every other set having cracks, the pair of new sets showed no damage.
    MattsWhatkiki180703
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    SprinkleOtter said:

    Are you telling me that they managed to only buy sets from Mexico, while none of the other twenty or so household managed to never buy a Mexican set, and I haven't either?
    I'm not telling you anything.

    The trouble with making suggestions on this subject is that they tend to be jumped for reasons that have no substance.

    I suspect that most, if not, all American (the continent(s), not the country) sets come from Mexico, whereas those in Europe don't. Other countries? I don't know. That wouldn't mean that all American sets crack, just that they'd be more likely to. It could even come down to the time of year when those sets are manufactured, or just the day when the air conditioning is undergoing maintenance.

    I've heard the argument before suggesting it's the environment where sets are kept that makes a difference. That's largely circumstantial, and ABS shouldn't be affected by the conditions in which it's stored (within reason); it is, however, affected by the conditions in which it is moulded. Of course "shouldn't" doesn't mean "isn't", but it doesn't really prove anything, one way or the other. Yes, the US has varied climates that might make a difference, and also, perhaps significantly, many people have domestic air conditioning of some sort.

    Somebody will then point out that most sets are listed as having parts made in most factories. I don't think that's necessarily strictly true - I think that the list is of those countries that might, in certain circumstances, supply parts for that set. For example, a piece that seems to have a lot of problems is the cheese wedge. It's a common part, so I imagine it's made in several factories. Usually, those parts end up particular geographic areas; it wouldn't make sense to make each piece in just one location and then ship them around the world. However, it still remains an option if there are production issues in  a particular factory, so the list of countries on the packaging includes any that are part of a backup plan, whether or not anything is normally made there. Some more unusual pieces may be made in just one location and distributed.

    Somebody will mention a set bought elsewhere that has many cracked elements. Again it's circumstantial unless there's a reasonable number of examples to suggest that the problem is universal and not more likely to occur in certain territories.

    Yes, it's all conjecture, but we don't have many hard facts and that's probably the best we can do. However, it does seem to fit the little we do know. The storage environment theory might also be valid, but it goes against the properties of ABS. There may be other suggestions - in which case make them! Perhaps the moulding machines, being made by a German manufacturer, are optimised to work in Europe and don't do quite as well elsewhere.
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,779
    But your theory doesn't seem to fit what evidence we have at all. Many people here have complained about almost all of their sets having cracked parts, but others don't have any cracked parts. If the issue was at the factory, wouldn't the cracking be more evenly distributed?
    MattsWhatkiki180703
  • MattsWhatMattsWhat Member Posts: 1,643
    edited March 2016
    I have to agree with @SprinkleOtter on this one.
    The observation is (or appears to be) that certain people get a lot of cracks on different sets, colours and parts.
    If it was happening at manufacture we would expect to see lots of cracks happening on certain sets, colours or parts for everyone.
    You are right that the weaknesses may well be being created at manufacture, that makes more sense.  It is even possible that this is why we see so little cracking in the UK (manufactured in Europe). But there has to still be some location or person specific issue going on to match the original observation.
    Interstingly I was reading an article on the impact of (essentially) old man sweat on the aging of leather furniture (essentially, oils from human skin, that are more prolific in men, age the leather and damage it - I can't find it again for some reason - I don't think I dreamed it).  Maybe the people with hot sweaty palms are reducing the impact of cracking due to moisturising the plastic with their natural oils as they build and the plastic being less likely to crack while warm.  Or the other way around.  You never know.
    SprinkleOttercatwranglerkiki180703
  • CCCCCC Member Posts: 20,526
    MrJ_NY said:
    I went over to check the Lego website and I found this in the reviews:


    "Just one single complaint... Lego seems to be going crazy with the whole "fusing two colors of plastic into a single component" thing. They started with just doing it for Superhero-themed minifigures' boots, but on this guy, they've done it for his chest and shark-head, which leads me to my problem: This technique makes the plastic much easier to crack, as mine did. It's a very small, hardly visible fracture in the shark's nose, but it is still there."


    I don't have one with me so I cannot check ... is the torso really dual molded? I though it was printed. Same with the teeth, I assumed they were painted not dual molded.
  • nerzhinnerzhin Member Posts: 22
    But your theory doesn't seem to fit what evidence we have at all. Many people here have complained about almost all of their sets having cracked parts, but others don't have any cracked parts. If the issue was at the factory, wouldn't the cracking be more evenly distributed?


    I think 'yes, it would be more evenly distributed'. However, since the majority of Lego is sold as kids toys and kids are the primary users of the product, it's possible that there is a ton of cracking that just goes unnoticed, or that kids don't report it/request replacements. My nephews had no idea that their lego was cracked until I went through their Star Wars Lego collection and showed them all the minifigures with splitting torsos and forearms. Their parents were not very happy with me....

    Many of the cracks appear as hair-thin black lines at first, and do not emerge as fully broken Lego until much later. Sometimes, you cannot tell it even is cracked until you connect and unconnect it to studs and watch the slight appearance of the crack.

    Some of the cracks I've found on my display models, I did not notice until I looked at them from every angle with a flashlight, especially at all connection points. Once you start looking for them, its hard to stop because it freaks you out.

    catwranglerkiki180703
  • MrJ_NYMrJ_NY Member Posts: 592
    "UPDATE: Kim Thomsen, Associate Community Manager from LEGO, looked into this
    to clarify what happened. He said the following: "So far all that I have learned
    is that Tesco apparently had an issue with the bar code system and it should
    be fixed now. The rest is just rumors - there is no IP claim with the Shark Guy
    - he was designed long before it became a costume with an uncoordinated dancer
    in it. But it was definitely boosted by so many internet sites running with the
    story with little to no research to back it up."

    Also, this was not a recall as it was originally reported by employees from various
    stores (and I believe the first report was from a Tesco cashier), but a stop-sale
    at some locations. It is possible though that cash-register screens don't
    differentiate between reasons you can't sell a product and they show the
    same message whether it is a stop sale or a recall or whatever. So there is no
    reason to believe the employees were making the story up.

    So Shark Guy is clear of all charges."
    madforLEGOcatwranglerkiki180703dougtsraygunnOmastar
  • BrickDancerBrickDancer Member Posts: 3,639
    ^I'm impressed TLG knows where the 'Respond' button is on the emails regarding this question and stopped the rumor in it's tracks immediately.

    Now I just wish they would use the same urgency in answering our repeated question of "Why are my bricks cracking?!?!"
    catwranglerkiki180703Mynatt
  • BrewBrew Member Posts: 183
    I am one of those unfortunate people that seems to find lots of cracking parts. A couple of things: You can't see the cracks unless you look carefully at connected pieces. If they are on there own, unconnected, the cracks seem to disappear. As far as manufacturing vs environment goes, I just visited Denmark and purchased a couple of sets for my kids. I will keep my eye on those to see if cracking appears because I am pretty curious. I may even buy a duplicate here just to test.
    catwranglerkiki180703
  • willobee498willobee498 Member Posts: 349
    Now I just wish they would use the same urgency in answering our repeated question of "Why are my bricks cracking?!?!"
    I doubt they have an answer. As is constantly discussed, these cracks affect some, but not all. 
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    But your theory doesn't seem to fit what evidence we have at all. Many people here have complained about almost all of their sets having cracked parts, but others don't have any cracked parts. If the issue was at the factory, wouldn't the cracking be more evenly distributed?
    The base question here was about whether there was a difference between the prevalence of cracking in the UK and the US. My suggestion still fits that question.

    There may then be a subsidiary question of what affects cracking of individual pieces within the Americas. Quite simply, if the initial issue is resolved and the incidence of cracking is similar globally, then this second question may be totally irrelevant.

    I've long suspected something likes this, and judging by the comments of some other non-Americans, looking from the outside as it were, I am not alone. I'm fairly outspoken, but I've resisted the temptation to post something along this lines because I knew somebody would throw it out saying the evidence suggests otherwise. But it doesn't. There may well be wider factors at play, but the most important one is to determine whether this affects some countries more than others. If we find that it happens in the US more than Europe, and in particular, if it happens in those areas of the US that have a similar climate to Europe, then that's likely to be a significant step forward.

    But at the end of the day, it doesn't affect me, so why should I be concerned? I'm simply making a suggestion that might help some other people, who are experiencing a problem. If you don't like ideas, you can always find your own.
    MattsWhat said:
    But there has to still be some location or person specific issue going on to match the original observation.
    Quite possibly, but those people who haven't been affected so far have to hope that it is only secondary to a more identifiable problem.
    Interstingly I was reading an article on the impact of (essentially) old man sweat on the aging of leather furniture (essentially, oils from human skin, that are more prolific in men, age the leather and damage it - I can't find it again for some reason - I don't think I dreamed it).  Maybe the people with hot sweaty palms are reducing the impact of cracking due to moisturising the plastic with their natural oils as they build and the plastic being less likely to crack while warm.  Or the other way around.  You never know.
    One of the things about ABS is that it's resistant to most forms of attack like this. Otherwise the first port of call might well be to ask countless questions about factors that might affect the environment.
    Brew said:
    As far as manufacturing vs environment goes, I just visited Denmark and purchased a couple of sets for my kids. I will keep my eye on those to see if cracking appears because I am pretty curious. I may even buy a duplicate here just to test.
    Good for you! That's a positive step in moving forward with the problem, and was what I was hoping might happen.
    catwranglerkiki180703
  • CCCCCC Member Posts: 20,526
    I wonder if Clumsy Guy's torso will crack more than others?

    Coolguy5000catwranglerSprinkleOtterVorpalRyukiki180703Mynatttallblocktoo
  • Rainstorm26Rainstorm26 Member Posts: 1,013
    ^ Only at @Brew 's house. ;)
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    CCC said:
    I wonder if Clumsy Guy's torso will crack more than others?

    That might depend on whether he's a Clumsy American or a Clumsy European.
  • SumoLegoSumoLego Member Posts: 15,229
    I just assume he's American.
    VorpalRyukiki180703
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    SumoLego said:
    I just assume he's American.
    Are you implying all Americans are clumsy?
    SumoLegoVorpalRyukiki180703
  • SumoLegoSumoLego Member Posts: 15,229
    edited March 2016
    I am assuming the Clumsy CMF is American.  Not all Americans are clumsy.  I would like to see a banana-suit guy for Series 16...  

    As I also assume a sharply dressed CMF is British (and probably a diabolical villain), and the pencil-moustached waiter is French.

    And that the red, white and blue daredevil is also American, and probably clumsy as well.  Or atleast injury-prone.
    VorpalRyuDedgeckotallblocktookiki180703
  • BrewBrew Member Posts: 183
    I just had an interesting experience...
    I just finished taking apart the Ewok Village. It has been sitting on display for over a year and within reach of my 4 year olds (twins). Between them, their cousin and the other similar aged twins in the neighborhood, the village looked like the empire actually did have an entire legion of the emperors best troops there. In other words, pretty destroyed. I had to check the entire inventory to make sure it was all there and carefully bag everything. Surprisingly only 2 carrots and 2 sausages were missing. But even more surprising was that there was not a single cracked piece. There are many types of parts in this set I've seen cracked before, but in this set, not even a cheese slope had a crack. 

    Must have been made in Europe... :)
    catwranglerMattsWhatkiki180703
  • Rainstorm26Rainstorm26 Member Posts: 1,013
    Check the box seals.  If it has an S, then you are correct. If it has an R them it's Mexico. 
  • GothamConstructionCoGothamConstructionCo Member Posts: 805
    edited March 2016
    Brew said:
    Surprisingly only 2 carrots and 2 sausages were missing. 
    Hmm, this sounds like one for @SumoLego ;o)
  • BrewBrew Member Posts: 183
    edited March 2016
    Check the box seals.  If it has an S, then you are correct. If it has an R them it's Mexico. 
    I didn't realize it was that simple. It has an R on the seal. I still am stumpy by why some sets seem to have an abundance of cracks while others don't show any in the same pieces. Same thing with my ToO set. No observed cracks. That one obviously has lots of black parts which I don't recall seeing a problem with so I didn't really think it was a good example.

    The other thing that's weird is that the EV set was fairly abused in terms of tough play. I've got other sets that were just displayed an have lots of cracked pieces. WTF.

    In the quality world, when defects don't follow a statistical rational, it usually means special cause variation is in play. I have not been able to identify any special cause in my environment so I'm still in the manufacturing camp. Although I'm still not ruling out environmental causes. 
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Member Posts: 10,788
    Maybe LEGO cracks less the more you play with it? ;)

    SprinkleOtterkiki180703
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    Brew said:

    I still am stumpy by why some sets seem to have an abundance of cracks while others don't show any in the same pieces.
    That might depend on the time of year a set is manufactured. Whilst they have the huge robotic warehouses full of bricks, it's still quite likely that many of the pieces are made virtually on-demand for a particular batch of sets. Or perhaps the reverse is true - it's the parts, of particular types, that have been sitting in the warehouse that end up cracking.

    An alternative idea is that some batches of plastic aren't up to scratch. That too would work its way through to parts created at a particular time being different. TLG used to get all their raw ABS from the same source that they've been using for the last half century; part of the reason they now self-colour is so that they can use different sources.
    catwranglerkiki180703
  • BrewBrew Member Posts: 183
    ^ I have a feeling it has something to do with the second point you make. Let's say, hypothetically, that North America sources raw materials from suppliers in the same region they are manufactured. If that (or those) suppliers have some batches of plastic that is sub-standard then it may manifest into grouped lumps of bricks that have lower strength. Unless TLG homogenizes the bricks somehow, it could show up as lots of cracking in one set and none in another. If a region has multiple suppliers (as I would guess) it could also just be one supplier out of 2 or 3 that supplies sub-standard plastic.

    If all the bricks were similar, then I would expect to see cracking in a predictable (statistically normal) way. If environment was the root-cause, then I would expect bricks seeing the same environment (sun, heat, humidity, amount of play, etc.) to also behave in a predictable way.

    Does anyone here really know TLG supply/manufacturing/distribution chain? I'd love to know.
    catwranglerkiki180703SumoLego
  • Rainstorm26Rainstorm26 Member Posts: 1,013
    edited March 2016
    One thing I noticed was that @Brew you had a whole pink car with cracked bricks from the Simpsons house. My kids each got a pink flamingo mmb. The pink cheese slopes in those sets all appear to have cracks in them. Maybe it is the colorant combined with another factor like mfg process or abs source quality. Just speculating. 
    catwranglerkiki180703
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    Brew said:

    Does anyone here really know TLG supply/manufacturing/distribution chain? I'd love to know.
    Both ABS and polycarbonate used to be supplied exclusively by Lanxess, previously part of Bayer (which has been involved since the very early days). It's a German company, albeit with overseas operation - which may well mean that it still supplies the European factories, but not the Mexican or Chinese. Interestingly, they opened a new plastics plant in Brazil a couple of years ago.

    Now? Who knows?
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    Maybe it is the colorant combined with another factor like mfg process or abs source quality. Just speculating. 
    Another thought for those with lots of cracked pieces... Do the pieces that crack have a "stronger" or  "weaker" colour than those that don't? Is the amount of colourant causing a problem?
    catwranglerkiki180703
  • BrewBrew Member Posts: 183
    TigerMoth said:
    Brew said:

    Does anyone here really know TLG supply/manufacturing/distribution chain? I'd love to know.
    Both ABS and polycarbonate used to be supplied exclusively by Lanxess, previously part of Bayer (which has been involved since the very early days). It's a German company, albeit with overseas operation - which may well mean that it still supplies the European factories, but not the Mexican or Chinese. Interestingly, they opened a new plastics plant in Brazil a couple of years ago.

    Now? Who knows?
    Thanks for the info. 

    I too believe there is an interaction with the colorant. I have seen sand green, brown, pink, white, dark red, tan, and lt. Bley bricks mostly with cracks. Not really in red, blue, and black, or green.
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,779
    One thing I noticed was that @Brew you had a whole pink car with cracked bricks from the Simpsons house. My kids each got a pink flamingo mmb. The pink cheese slopes in those sets all appear to have cracks in them. Maybe it is the colorant combined with another factor like mfg process or abs source quality. Just speculating. 
    Cheese slopes don't really count here- they have their own issues.
  • DedgeckoDedgecko Member Posts: 798
    Without having the batch information and test coupons to destroy in compression tests this is all hearsay.  
    The only ones that know what's wrong is the TLG.  Until they sort it out, keep asking for replacements from their customer service department.  If they get tired of hearing from you, as some have mentioned being cutoff, report TLG to social media, get in touch with a Lego Ambassador, and then notify some Safety Toy Government type officials since no one wants plastic cracking and potentially slicing children's fingers open, or getting stuck in the bottom of someone's foot, or exploding while it's on display (the more dramatic and blown out of proportion, the more likely you will see some progress).

    catwranglerkiki180703
  • monkeyhangermonkeyhanger Member Posts: 3,169
    ^ A real exploding Lego Death Star - now that would be sight to behold!
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    Dedgecko said:
    Without having the batch information and test coupons to destroy in compression tests this is all hearsay.
    Most of it, yes. However, we can still try to identify whether it seems to be a Mexican / non-Mexican thing. That's important because, if true, would mean that the piece design itself isn't at fault. If, for example, a European plant can produce the billion or so cheese wedges for each Tower Bridge without problem, then why should Americans have to live with cracks? (Having said that, I don't think I've heard anybody complaining about them cracking.)

    If the design isn't at fault, then the problem should be fixable - even if it's only by producing the problematic pieces in a plant that can do so successfully. On the other hand, if the design is at fault, then there's a bigger problem in that it may be impossible to produce without some degree of cracking.

    But the important thing is to talk about it in a way that generates more ideas and more information about when the problem occurs.
    catwranglerkiki180703
  • Rainstorm26Rainstorm26 Member Posts: 1,013
    One thing I noticed was that @Brew you had a whole pink car with cracked bricks from the Simpsons house. My kids each got a pink flamingo mmb. The pink cheese slopes in those sets all appear to have cracks in them. Maybe it is the colorant combined with another factor like mfg process or abs source quality. Just speculating. 
    Cheese slopes don't really count here- they have their own issues.
    On the contrary...these are the piece types where you can assess the potential factors as they have the most tendency to crack.  To evaluate the factors, you want a high signal.  If only 1 out of 1000000 , 1x1 bricks tend to crack, but 1 out of 100 cheese slopes crack, one can try to identify more readily if factors such as colorant impact the potential for cracking by studying the cheese slopes.
    catwranglerkiki180703
  • BrewBrew Member Posts: 183
    ^Totally agree. Cheese slopes don't exhibit 100% cracking, but they are the most reported problem. It's most likely their design that makes them the most susceptible to potential material issues. If TLG were able to change the defect rate of a cheese slope from 1% down to 3 parts per million, they would most likely have fixed the entire problem across all parts. If they improved the cracking rate of 1x1 bricks down to 3 ppm, cheese slopes may still crack at a relatively high rate like 100 ppm.
    catwranglerGalactus
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    Back to the cheese wedge, eh?

    Seeing as someone has already commented that they've seen cracks in brick yellow pieces, what are people's experiences with them cracking in Tower Bridge? It's an interesting set because there are a large number of them, presumably mostly from the same batch, and will therefore have spent their entire life under much the same conditions. I think we'd have heard about it if a set had a couple of hundred that were cracked. Or do they all come from Europe? Or something else?
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