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How to get started selling on Bricklink

24

Comments

  • All_That_RocksAll_That_Rocks UKMember Posts: 643
    CCC said:
    When you see a deal you will often have to jump quickly. Even quicker if it is very good.
    I'm sure - am still learning when a deal is a good deal or not :)
  • All_That_RocksAll_That_Rocks UKMember Posts: 643
    How do you guys maintain your inventories? Are you doing this manually/directly or via XML upload or via software like Brickstock?
  • LobotLobot UKMember Posts: 976
    How do you guys maintain your inventories? Are you doing this manually/directly or via XML upload or via software like Brickstock?


    If you're parting out new sets, there's an option in Bricklink which enables you to do this very quickly.  It also allow you to set each price individually, or as an average of current/previous 6 months etc.  You can also automatically consolidate new parts into existing stock, which is very helpful!  Some stores don't seem to utilise this, and often have multiple entries for the same part/colour which seems a bit of an odd strategy...

    If you use this you're relying on the Bricklink inventory for each set being accurate (plus the one you've physically purchased!) but from my experience it's usually pretty good.  There's also an option to exclude the 'extras' if you prefer to be cautious. 

    kiki180703All_That_Rockschuckp
  • kiki180703kiki180703 Montreal, CanadaMember Posts: 1,046
    Thanks @graphite !
  • All_That_RocksAll_That_Rocks UKMember Posts: 643
    Thanks for the response @Lobot
  • All_That_RocksAll_That_Rocks UKMember Posts: 643
    Any thoughts on how Bricklink compares to Brick Owl? Brick link is clearly the better known but do many sellers duplicate their inventory on both systems?

    Also, not sure if this has been covered above but what are the deciding factors on selling sets complete vs parting out. Here's a real example for you as an experiment. I have bought some sets of #75077 for £4.04 each (RRP £8.99). Would you list as sets or parts?
  • DadsAFOLDadsAFOL USAMember Posts: 617
    Hey everyone, good advice so far in this thread.  I thought I'd pass on some words of wisdom from a big seller for all you guys with grand aspirations.  BL is a lot of work.  I started as a hobby seller too, so it is possible to grow, but don't underestimate the labor involved.  We have 3 full time employees, plus a couple of part timers. We are getting 500-600 orders a month, and have a current inventory of 1.3 million parts.

    So if you have big dreams, you'll eventually have to deal with running a business.  Hiring and firing employees, renting someplace for people to work, doing the accounting, and dealing with other non-Lego business stuff.  It can be fun, but its hard work!

    There's some talk in the thread of the momentum point.  I agree that it can vary based on what you have and how you are pricing it, but for selling parts at the average price, I'd say that when I got to about 50,000 parts is when business started rolling.  I'd also estimate that running a 50,000-part store took about 6 hours a day of my time.

    As for BrickOwl, that marketplace is more for non-AFOL shoppers, and seems to be around 25-30% of the volume for us, so definitely worth pursuing.  There is free software called BrickSync that automatically syncs the inventory, so you can have the same parts in both stores.

    I'm off to BricksLA today, so if you have questions, I won't be able to respond right away, but I will try to answer them all this weekend.
    kiki180703DiggydoesKevin_HyatttecjamPitfall69SlapNutsCntryislandboyAndorMr_Cross
  • All_That_RocksAll_That_Rocks UKMember Posts: 643
    Thanks @DadsAFOL and congrats on building a business out of this (as hard as it is). For myself, I am definitely interested in this only as an extension of the hobby though I am intrigued by the whole running a business thing. The fact that you actually have employees is pretty mind blowing.

    Thanks also for the insights regards BrickOwl, sounds like once you have a store well established it is worthwhile selling through both channels. 

    Good tip regarding BrickSync - Have a great time at BricksLA

     
  • haakonohaakono Member Posts: 62
    edited January 2016
    My two cents: planning ahead for order work-flow will help you save time. I started out reusing old boxes. Once my volume increased to more than a couple orders per week, I found it very helpful to switch to new boxes with standard sizes. I'm in the US, so I'm not sure what the equivalent in the UK would be, but I use Kraft bubble envelopes, (3"x5", and 4"x6") for small orders/minifigs, and 10"x6"x4" boxes for larger parts orders/small sets. For larger sets, I use 3 different sizes that work for almost all of my orders. It's worth watching for deals on the packaging you plan to use before you setup your shop, so that you have supplies on hand once orders start rolling in. Also, I recommend getting a scale to weigh packages and buy postage on-line. I use a food scale and it works just fine---no need for a fancy postal scale.
    kiki180703All_That_RocksCntryislandboy
  • All_That_RocksAll_That_Rocks UKMember Posts: 643
    Thanks for the tip @haakono , looking for supplies now.
  • koshkakoshka UK/SwedenMember Posts: 193
    One week in to my new year's aim of selling some of my surplus bricks I can definitely relate to much of the advice given on this thread. I just had my first Bricklink order but last week I sold about 20 lots on Tradera (Swedish version of ebay). Having saved much of the packaging from my own Bricklink orders I thought that I would have plenty to spare. The size of the items that I sold meant that I was cutting up large jiffy bag envelopes to create smaller ones by around the 15th order. I've also made a big dent in the 100 grip seal bags that I bought from ebay. My home office resembled a Post Office by Sunday evening. 

    Several things that I've done to try and make life easier for next week. 1) ordered lots of small and medium jiffy bag envelopes and different size grip seal bags. 2) added a lot more text to my adverts and winners emails to try and limit the queries and the need to chase up payment. 3) bought lots of stamps as the small size of many of the orders means that I can use the local postbox and not go to the post office.

    Things I still need to think about. I set up my Bricklink store to accept payment in Swedish and British currency. The first person to order asked if they could pay in Euros or Dollars. As I order from Euro based stores myself I guess it might be worth holding a Paypal based bunch of Euros but I probably don't want too much. I ideally want to avoid adding Paypal and packaging fees as those are things that sometimes put me off of using a store.

    I'm definitely treating last week as a learning experience as it was a lot of work. On the plus side I made about £80 and freed up some space.
  • All_That_RocksAll_That_Rocks UKMember Posts: 643
    @koshka sounds like quite a week. What frightens me a little is the apparent volume of orders for so little (figuratively speaking) return. And this is where my hesitation is coming from with regards Bricklink. I suspect that I have had fewer sales but made more money over the last week on eBay. 

    I am buying with the intention of listing on eBay but then tend to end up listing on eBay as I feel this is a quicker, though possibly smaller return.

    What would help me understand the impact is an indication of:

    1. How many orders you handled
    2. Average value per order
    3. How much stock you had on Bricklink in order to attract these customers so quickly


    Thanks in advance for any further input.
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,742
    You'll want to remember, though- you're in no huge rush to sell your sets/parts. I've found in my week or so of selling on Bricklink that the margins there are much larger than ebay. And the whole selling experience on Bricklink is far superior to ebay in my opinion. Ebay is almost entirely buyer-oriented. Sellers can't leave any feedback but positive. Ebay almost always sides with buyers, even when they are obviously wrong or scammers.

    Say you sell one $100 set on ebay, and then the buyer claims its not as you described- you're pretty much out of luck, and the $100.
  • goshe7goshe7 Columbus, Ohio, USAMember Posts: 515
    ^ Not quite sure I agree with all those comments...

    BrickLink is superior in listing items as part of a formal catalog.  You also don't have to put much thought into the postage cost (as you generally can add that when sending an invoice).  Bulk management of a BrickLink store is also easier/faster than bulk management of multiple eBay listings.  So those are some good pluses.

    On the minus side, BrickLink is much harder for a buyer to navigate so the audience is more limited.  And having filtered out the "regular guy" and making the bulk of buyers dedicated LEGO fans, BrickLink buyers tend to be much more picky about the item condition.  A minor scuff from shelfwear on a box or new part is pretty much a non-issue on eBay whereas it can be a significant buyer complaint on BrickLink.
    * All my general experience, not documented facts

    PayPal terms are very favorable to the buyer, regardless of the selling venue.  I have lost more money on BrickLink PayPal scams than on eBay PayPal scams.  To make this comparison, I can say my total business volume in $ to date is about equivalent on both sites.
  • KingAlanIKingAlanI Rochester, NYMember Posts: 2,037
    I've done a lot of online selling elsewhere, whether eBay or collector forums for other items, and I figure the general experience will help me.
  • koshkakoshka UK/SwedenMember Posts: 193
    Tradera (ebay) figures
    Total lots sold = 22 (20 unsold)
    Number of buyers = 15
    Average order value = about £6 before fees
    Bricks sold = about 600
    Polybags sold = 2

    I'd estimate that the prices that I received per brick were as much as double what I would have received on Bricklink. Larger plates and small tiles were the best sellers and bulk lots of used standard bricks went for the lowest values. I thought that listing smaller lots might encourage people to buy several items but that didn't always work out. Not listing 5 of the smaller lots might have saved me a lot of time. The lots that didn't sell are for rarer parts where Bricklink buyers are more likely to understand the value. This week I have limited time so I've only listed a few polybags / small sets and a couple of bulk lots of tiles. There was a lot less time spent on listing as I was basically able to copy previous adverts and change the pictures.

    The first Bricklink order is for about £25. I've only listed about 250 parts but many of these are ones that people will want if they are bricklinking high value sets e.g. older modulars and the VW Beetle. I feel that this is the market that I understand best as I've spent the past 2-3 years building Market Street, Green Grocer and Cafe Corner. I'm in no rush to sell these parts so I'll leave the prices fairly high. I'm thinking of adding new parts for the same sets if I can pick them up cheaply when I'm buying things for myself e.g. from the PAB wall.

  • All_That_RocksAll_That_Rocks UKMember Posts: 643
    @koshka thanks for the further info on sales volumes etc. Seems to concur with others' opinion that, in summary, selling of Bricklink brings better returns in the long run but take longer to sell. 

    On a slightly different note - One of my biggest issues is whether to part items out or not. An example for instance is in the purchase of 60-70 packs of Mixels. I'm finding it difficult to decide whether to part these out or sell as sets.


  • koshkakoshka UK/SwedenMember Posts: 193
    I think that parting out Mixels would be very time consuming. I parted out a bunch of 60-70 piece sets to get some of the parts that I needed for one of the modulars and it took quite a while. Unless the Mixels contain a particularly rare part then I'd personally sell them as complete sets.
  • Sethro3Sethro3 United StatesMember Posts: 819
    After reading all of this, I think it confirms to me that I do not want to open a store. I think my time can be better spent elsewhere. Sure, I could free up some space and make a little extra money to help with the hobby, but I wouldn't be selling complete sets so I don't think the space would really be freed up. It doesn't matter about the longterm gains for me. And I technically have the space for storage, so I'm not too concerned. But I could always use more money.

    Still, best of luck. There seems to be a lot of good information on this post, so kudos for asking the questions.
    All_That_Rockskiki180703
  • dagsbricksdagsbricks Portland, ORMember Posts: 27
    Was it on brickset that they posted about this eBook?
    It's a book that is a how to guide on how to open a bricklink store. I haven't personally read it and all the reviews seem suspiciously optimistic... But may be worth a read

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B017DYMPM6/ref=pd_aw_sim_351_2?ie=UTF8&dpID=51v+NaV6IeL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_UX300_PJku-sticker-v3,TopRight,0,-44_AC_UL100_SR100,100_&refRID=1852GTK56X54X4KTM7FK

    P.s. remember to click through bricksets affiliate links if you do buy it. 

    I'm a little late to this thread but as the author of that book I assure you all the reviews are real and I paid no one. :-)

    Brian "Dag"
    Andor
  • RebelegoRebelego Georgia, USAMember Posts: 171
    Sethro3 said:
    ...And I technically have the space for storage, so I'm not too concerned. 
    I see what you did there...TECHNICally...I gotcha, I gotcha. ;)
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 18,921
    In the case if the Mixels, it depends on the variety. If you buy 63 and have 7 sets of 9, then sell as sets. If you buy 20 lots of just three different ones, part them out.

    It's rarely worth parting out one or two sets, but if you have a number it is more efficient. If there are cheap parts (1 or 2p) then make the buyer buy all you have or 20 at a time or similar. You can set that with the bulk amount.

    It is also worth setting a reasonable minimum if you don't want to have to deal with small orders. Set £10 and it stops orders of a couple of parts. Some people will say you may lose orders, but those are the small orders you don't want anyway.
  • KingAlanIKingAlanI Rochester, NYMember Posts: 2,037
    http://www.bricklink.com/store.asp?p=KingAlanI here
    I started with sealed sets I got cheap. Some went quickly, but I still have a lot. I've already lowered prices a couple times and may do so again. (Should I lower the list price or label it as a discount off my list price?)
    My parts come from sets where I wanted some but not all of the pieces, or particularly worn parts from my own collection.

    ((Item value+fixed fees)/(1-percentage fees)) is the amount you need to break even. Bricklink's fee is 3% of the item cost. PayPal isn't required, but most buyers use it, so account for that. They have a fixed fee and a percentage of the whole payment. A small handling fee keeps me from losing money on tiny orders, which I get a lot of.

    I've done a lot of buying and selling online with other collectibles, and the general experience helped.

  • All_That_RocksAll_That_Rocks UKMember Posts: 643
    As an update, I have setup a store with a modest stock which I am still trying to grow. I have used eBay for many years which has been a good primer. The Mixels I decided to not part out and most have already sold as either full sets of 9 or as sets of each tribe (3 mixels). That said, these sales were through eBay and not Bricklink.

    I have progressed to buying up cheap sets when I see them, usually in multiples of 5 or so but do still struggle with the decision to part out vs selling sealed sets. As I am pretty new to this most of the sets are only just disappearing from store shelves. 

    It was a buzz to get my first order on Bricklink for 3 x #75036 and some spares. Followed by another order for spares only. But I had a big realisation this week that sets will sell in bulk on Bricklink whereas this is not the case on eBay. My first bulk sale was for 6 of the same set at around £25 a set. Followed by larger bulk orders. My main issue currently is one of space and capital to increase the stock. However I have seen a great return on most of my purchases to date allowing me to buy a few personal items I otherwise wouldn't have been able to afford as well as being able to reinvest in stock.

    Currently I'm still using both eBay and Bricklink. Of course Bricklinks fee's are a little better than eBay's (3% vs 10%) but Paypal fees are the same. eBay tends to move faster and more regularly at present.  

    I have to say I am enjoying things so far, though you can't underestimate the amount of work involved. 
    KingAlanIkiki180703
  • KingAlanIKingAlanI Rochester, NYMember Posts: 2,037
    Even though eBay has quicker turnover, the higher fees make it too hard to have a decent margin on stuff bought for resale, at least the way I see it.
  • bricktuarybricktuary Krakozhia (temporarily stuck in London)Member Posts: 512
    ^^ what is your store Rocks? I've been following this thread with interest, I'd love to see your store now. 
  • All_That_RocksAll_That_Rocks UKMember Posts: 643
  • kiki180703kiki180703 Montreal, CanadaMember Posts: 1,046
    edited March 2016
    @All_That_Rocks Awesome! When I find the time to update my list, I'll add you to it ;) Just please post a comment in my thread (Bricksetters' Bricklink Stores)  so that I remember.
  • andheandhe UKMember Posts: 3,061
    This isn't a selling question, but perhaps a seller might be able to answer it 9and I din't want to start another bricklink thread). Who should pay the paypal fees?

    It seems that a number of sellers add this on to the buyers bill, but is it unreasonable of me to expect the seller to be paying these on the transaction (especially as the paypal website says 'you won't be charged for this transaction')? Or am I missing something?
  • RebelegoRebelego Georgia, USAMember Posts: 171
    @andhe, I have a BL store in the US. It is illegal for us to make the buyer pay the PP fees. It's just another expense for us sellers.  I believe they have the right to make the buyer pay the PP fees in Europe if I'm not mistaken. If it were me, I wouldn't buy from a store that makes me pay the PP fee.
    andhekiki180703
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,742
    ^ I just factor them into the prices of my items- usually using paypal shipping labels saves me about that much (though not always, so I still have to charge the USPS rate).

    Quick note to anyone using paypal labels- always check with your usual shipping provider, too. Especially for international shipment. Paypal wanted to charge me $5 or $10 extra for international shipment.
  • ColoradoBricksColoradoBricks Denver, CO, USAMember Posts: 1,660
    While it is not authorized in the US, many sellers still do. I think it is legal in Europe.

    I personally don't like it as it is making harder to compare prices between stores and I tend to stay away from those stores.
    Between paypal fees, lot fees, etc fees, I think some sellers take advantage of that as it is not practical to read each store terms and spash page and always get surprised.

    BO is better that way as what you see is what you pay and I have applied that to my BL store, no fees and simple shipping chart.
    andhekiki180703Sethro3
  • RebelegoRebelego Georgia, USAMember Posts: 171
    @SprinkleOtter, were the international shipments USPS First Class? If so, PayPal does not have an option for that. You have to go through USPS.com or PO to send International FC. Unless you're talking about something else. Then, disregard.

    And yes, a lot of US sellers just work the PP fees into their prices.  Many sellers charge handling/packaging fees. Those are probably what they spend on packaging plus PP fees.  As long as you don't state that buyer pays PP fees. You're good to go.
    I pad my shipping prices just a little bit. But my prices are approx. 90% of 6-Mo Avg.
    SprinkleOtterkiki180703
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 18,921
    I also tend to avoid stores that charge PayPal fees. Quite a few stores overcharge for it too.
    Cntryislandboy
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,742
    @Rebelego No, I don't think so. It had $200 insurance.
    Rebelego
  • goshe7goshe7 Columbus, Ohio, USAMember Posts: 515
    andhe said:
    This isn't a selling question, but perhaps a seller might be able to answer it 9and I din't want to start another bricklink thread). Who should pay the paypal fees?

    It seems that a number of sellers add this on to the buyers bill, but is it unreasonable of me to expect the seller to be paying these on the transaction (especially as the paypal website says 'you won't be charged for this transaction')? Or am I missing something?
    With the exception of a completely terrible seller (who loses money), the buyer always pays for PayPal fees.  Once that generality is accepted, you can appreciate the nuances of how the individual buyer pays that fee.

    1. US sellers cannot charge an explicit PayPal fee per the PayPal T&C.  But they can charge a general order fee and offer a discount for other payment methods.  So the net effect is that you are charged a fee for PayPal, but it isn't explicitly identified as a PayPal fee.  It's all about the wording.

    2. There is no "right" answer on how that fee is incorporated.  Some sellers have it as an explicit, proportional charge.  Buyers bristle at the explicit identification, but are charged fairly for their order as each buyer pays the exact fees the seller is incurring.  Other sellers wrap it in a general fee or item prices.  Depending on what is ordered, the buyer may pay more or less than the exact fees the seller is incurring.  
    MattsWhatkiki180703KingAlanI
  • MattsWhatMattsWhat Studley, UKMember Posts: 1,643
    edited June 2016
    ^this.  It isn't unreasonable for the buyer to be paying it - it is like saying you resent paying for the lighting bill at Tesco as the lights are on now (while you are not there).  All the expenses of a well operated shop are passed on to the buyer one way or another.  Some shops state they charge for paypal, some charge a flat fee, some put it in to their prices, but it's always there.
    pharmjodgoshe7kiki180703KingAlanI
  • All_That_RocksAll_That_Rocks UKMember Posts: 643
    I don't agree with the buyer having to pay Paypal fees which can be considerable on higher value orders. However I do charge a 50p handling fee on top which basically covers the cost of the envelope. Would those of you who abscond from sellers with paypal fees accept that or would you also avoid this? 

    Wouldn't you just go with the cheapest seller (cost + shipping + fees) anyway?
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,742
    I don't agree with the buyer having to pay Paypal fees which can be considerable on higher value orders. However I do charge a 50p handling fee on top which basically covers the cost of the envelope. Would those of you who abscond from sellers with paypal fees accept that or would you also avoid this? 

    Wouldn't you just go with the cheapest seller (cost + shipping + fees) anyway?
    I just need to know- where are you buying 50p envelopes, and would you buy them from me for 49p? ;)
    Furrysaurus
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 18,921
    ^ For me, ideally, yes I'd go with the cheapest. But how to work out what the cheapest is without filling up exactly the same items in a cart and comparing everything once all costs are known?

    If there is a handling /packaging charge of ~50p - £1, that is fine for me. There are some costs associated per order and that covers them, whether it is the packaging, the fixed part of the paypal fee, anything else that is per order. Most UK sellers use paypal, as do most buyers. Thus I think the percentage costs of paypal should be included in the price of the parts. If they are not, then the seller is getting a competitive advantage over others by hiding the percentage fee from the straight comparison of price of a part in one store vs price of the same part in another store. If they are willing to "cheat" there, will they be doing it elsewhere too? Of course, some sellers might claim this is actually being open and not hiding the costs - that they are giving a base cost then showing where all the fees are coming from. However, when virtually all sellers include the paypal fees in their prices, then I think it is more about tricking buyers into thinking the store is cheap rather than being upfront about where costs are. That is why I tend to just least favourite any stores doing it and move on.

    There are even some sellers that try to add on BL fees in their terms and conditions.
    andheKingAlanI
  • All_That_RocksAll_That_Rocks UKMember Posts: 643
    I just need to know- where are you buying 50p envelopes, and would you buy them from me for 49p? ;)
    Well ok Envelope and fixed part of eBay fee. Personally I don't think this is unreasonable  however I would consider dropping it if its genuinely putting people off purchasing. 

    To me, this seems more transparent than just adding to each part. What would you add to a 0.02 part for instance? Increasing to 0.025 is a 25% increase which seems much worse to me that the 50p total order fee.
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,742
    ^ I was just joking. In my experience, envelopes cost a couple cents each.
  • workshybumworkshybum UKMember Posts: 64
    edited June 2016
    I've often thought of opening a store too, so having just stumbled upon this thread, I've found it very interesting.

    For me, a store would be primarily for hobby purposes - something to keep me busy whilst ideally generating just enough profit to make it worthwhile.

    Reading this thread has reinforced my view that it would not be feasible for me right now (with a full time job and a young family) but it is something I look forward to doing in the future so I'm grateful for the excellent input I've found here.


  • KingAlanIKingAlanI Rochester, NYMember Posts: 2,037
    My item prices account for the percentage PayPal fee, and the fixed fee is one thing covered by my handling charge, $1 domestic $2 foreign. International is higher partially because PayPal fees are 1% higher and I have to collect more to cover postage. I consider it a bonus if a buyer pays by another method. Most of my orders are small, so printing shipping labels is convenient but doesn't save me much money. Regular envelopes are only a couple cents, but bubblemailers are about 50c in small quantities (though I got those in bulk)
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,742
    @bibble69 Can I ask how many orders you get a day, usually?
    When you say 200,000 parts, do you mean different types of parts, or just parts total.

    Can I ask about how much you think you make a year? I know some people don't like to give out financials, so you can just answer in a vague ballpark or not at all.
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,742
    What alternate payment methods do other sellers use?
  • RirinetteRirinette CanadaMember Posts: 84
    I just started my store on Bricklink and added a few sets to it. 
    http://www.bricklink.com/store/home.page?p=Ririnette

    I wonder what type of info I need to get it going... I mean, I have no previous sales, so what would make a buyer trust me at this point other than my pinky swear that I won't steal their money?

    Please help and give me ideas of how to present my store policies. Thank you!
  • bibble69bibble69 UKMember Posts: 4
    @bibble69 Can I ask how many orders you get a day, usually?
    When you say 200,000 parts, do you mean different types of parts, or just parts total.

    Can I ask about how much you think you make a year? I know some people don't like to give out financials, so you can just answer in a vague ballpark or not at all.

    Orders per day is a bit of a misnomer as there are some factors that affect the number of orders I receive, but I work on an average of 3 orders per day, but it is very rare to get no orders in a day. That was until BL2 went live. I definitely had a drop in orders, none for 4 days which was unheard of for me. It's picking up now, but only, I think, because I've made some changes to my store to get on the featured stores on the BL homepage for local/nearest buyers, if I understand the help pages right.

    Here's a break down of the last 3 full years,

                     Orders    Turnover (approx)
    2013          1081          $24K
    2014          1012          $25K
    2015           868           $19K

    I don't know why 2015 was down, as it was the first time I'd had a drop in turnover, but had more parts listed at the end of that year than previous. This year I'm slightly down on numbers of orders compared to this time last year, but also my total stock levels have dropped, I think this is because I've got less time in the evening to part out sets due to time constraints with running the kids about to their swimming clubs.

    200,000 parts is what it is 200,000 parts/pieces in just over 4100 lots, of most of the different LEGO themes, except Duplo. Nearly all (about 99.5%) of these are new, so I'm competing against all the big full-time sellers really. 

    Payment methods I use are, Paypal, cash, cheque (UK only), Bank Transfer (UK only), Stripe, IBAN (Europe only).

    I also find if you accept more than 1 currency you will generate more orders.
  • bibble69bibble69 UKMember Posts: 4
    Ririnette said:
    I just started my store on Bricklink and added a few sets to it. 
    http://www.bricklink.com/store/home.page?p=Ririnette

    I wonder what type of info I need to get it going... I mean, I have no previous sales, so what would make a buyer trust me at this point other than my pinky swear that I won't steal their money?

    Please help and give me ideas of how to present my store policies. Thank you!
    3 things stand out immediately that may/will hold you back.

    1) Lack of inventory, you don't have enough items to generate visits to your store. It took me over a year to get enough inventory listed to generate enough sales that I wasn't investing my own money into stock.

    2) Low feedback, make more purchases so you have some feedback, aim to get upto at least 20 (all positive obviously), you then have a history of reliability

    3) Ship worldwide, only shipping to the USA and Canada limits your audience.

    hope this helps 


    Ririnettekiki180703
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