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What are the largest LEGO pieces?

I recently found a box of LEGO from my youth.  In, the box I  found a rather large brick, measuring 10 studs by 20 studs.  This is an actual brick, not a plate, and can be stacked on other bricks.  While this is probably not the largest brick ever made, it got me thinking...

What is the the largest brick?  Also what are the largest stackable plates ever made? What is the largest base plate?  What is the biggest piece by volume and/or by weight?  Conversely, is there anything smaller than a 1x1 round?


Comments

  • binaryeyebinaryeye USMember Posts: 1,734
    edited November 2015
    There very well could be larger parts, but going by the categories on BrickLink, it looks like the largest are:

    brick: 12x24
    plate: 16x16
    baseplate: 50x50

    The current airplane wing has to be one of the longer parts at 56 studs.

    Largest by volume would be difficult to determine easily. My guess is one of the raised baseplates, probably the one listed below.

    According to BrickLink's catalog, the heaviest part with a weight listed is a 100x250 Modulex baseplate at 7300g. The heaviest non-Modulex part is an old 12V train transformer at 1569g. The heaviest non-Modulex part without an electric component is this 24x36 Duplo brick at 880g, though it looks like it wasn't available in a set or individually. Ignoring a 2x8 brick that surely doesn't weigh 475g, it looks like one of the heaviest parts with System studs is this Belville raised baseplate at 330g. In general, the heaviest stuff is train motors/transformers, boat hulls, and Duplo parts.

    There are a lot of pieces smaller than a 1x1 round. This is probably one of the smallest individual pieces. But perhaps you're referring to pieces with a stud connection.
  • TheBigLegoskiTheBigLegoski Amsterdam, NederlandMember Posts: 1,410
    edited November 2015
    I thought these were the largest Lego parts: the garage ; and the house from this set.
    these huge boxes are prefabricated elements, that cannot be taken apart.
    http://brickset.com/sets/344-2/Service-Station-with-Billy-Goat-and-Mike-Monkey

    Well at least they were the largest Lego pieces known to me, if you consider these elements 'pieces', all depending on how you define what a Lego piece is. 
  • ecmo47ecmo47 North CarolinaMember Posts: 2,101
    The 19x22x? (64g) Boat Hull in the Durmstrang and Redbeard Pirate ship are pretty big.
  • FauchFauch FranceMember Posts: 2,383
    well this one is quite big
    http://brickset.com/parts/4503919
  • bortan88bortan88 Member Posts: 17
     This is my nomination for the biggest piece, some might debate that it's gear, and that primo, duplo and quatro dont count but they're all made by Lego.
    http://brickset.com/sets/2010-1/Baby-Walker


  • andheandhe UKMember Posts: 2,897
    edited November 2015
    binaryeye said:
    There very well could be larger parts, but going by the categories on BrickLink, it looks like the largest are:

    brick: 12x24

    I've got one of these and never really thought of it as a 'brick', but more of a thick baseplate!

    So what about raised baseplates?
  • MattsWhatMattsWhat Studley, UKMember Posts: 1,643
    ^indeed I have never considered it a brick for the reason that you cannot connect a single 1x1 brick to every available place on the bottom (at least if I remember correctly). I think it only has the connections 'properly' around the outside.

    The problem with the raised baseplates is they are hollow and therefore not much heavier than their flat companions.  I'm putting my vote for the baby walker.
  • FauchFauch FranceMember Posts: 2,383
    12x24 can be used like any normal bricks, according to my night lord castle.
  • davee123davee123 USAMember Posts: 810
    edited November 2015
    ^ I think he's talking about the 10x20 bricks from the 70s, which looked like this underneath:

    But the 12 x 24 bricks have a more standard bottom, and work like normal bricks.

    DaveE
    MattsWhat
  • FauchFauch FranceMember Posts: 2,383
    I've seen such bricks in very old bulks. probably some stuff owned by grandparents
  • aldreddaldredd United KingdomMember Posts: 203
    Always thought the flower/petal must be contender for smallest part
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    A horn is probably the smallest discrete part.

    All sorts of things from sprues are smaller, but they're really parts of parts.
  • binaryeyebinaryeye USMember Posts: 1,734
    TigerMoth said:
    A horn is probably the smallest discrete part.
    I'm pretty sure the insect antennae don't come on sprues, but it's been a while since I opened a set with one in it.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 18,310
    Feathers / quills are pretty small too.
  • rdflegordflego in a world of his ownMember Posts: 324
    What about 70501a, the coin off the sprue as the smallest? Can't get much smaller than that surely
  • MattsWhatMattsWhat Studley, UKMember Posts: 1,643
    davee123 said:
    ^ I think he's talking about the 10x20 bricks from the 70s, which looked like this underneath:

    But the 12 x 24 bricks have a more standard bottom, and work like normal bricks.

    DaveE
    That's the ones I remember. Didn't realise they were slightly smaller. Can't believe they are from that long ago though! Time flies eh?
  • aaronptrckaaronptrck Northern CaliforniaMember Posts: 15
    It has China written all over it.... but:
    http://brickset.com/parts/4616163

  • davee123davee123 USAMember Posts: 810
    Behold, in ye olde dayse of LUGNET, some of yon parts wert weighed:

    http://news.lugnet.com/market/shipping/?n=362

    The smallest on a chemistry scale was the minifig coin (smaller than the "lever handle" in a small lever).  But, obviously, not everything was tried.  A few other candidates at the time (that weren't measured) were crazy things like the center element from a Technic universal joint.

    DaveE
    Galactus
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