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Predictions on Discontinuing Sets and their Secondary Market Value

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Comments

  • juggles7juggles7 United StatesMember Posts: 452
    Pitfall69 said:
    The whole reseller thing is difficult to ascertain. There are people that resell Lego to help pay for the hobby they love. There are people who resell Lego to make ends meet or to afford a vacation that they desperately want. There are people that are in between jobs and are doing it to support the family. There are people that are in the reaelling game for the long haul and are making enough to quit their job that they hate or just want to be self employed. There are many reasons why people resell Lego. I doubt most resellers are greedy. I personally have NEVER cleaned out a store shelf, but who am I to judge people who do? 
    @Pitfall69, do you know of even one person who is actually "making enough to quit their job"? I would find that hard to believe.  I tried to make a living off Lego, and had no limitations to startup capital, storage space, or my own time.  Still couldn't do it. There are many reasons, but the main one is that there are too many other people trying to do the same thing, underselling you, and willing to settle for peanuts.

  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,444
    I know of at least one and that person knows more. I am sure there isn't a lot, but I guess it all depends on how much you make at your current job correct? 
    juggles7
  • Farmer_JohnFarmer_John USA - 4,035 Miles from 62 West Wallaby St., Wigan, Lancashire, UKMember Posts: 2,404
    I can see reselling to supplement your income, but I would be stressed out if I had to do it for a living. Too many unknowns. Now if the executives in Billund decided that Farmer_John needed to be in the loop on when sets come and go, I might be willing to take a stab at it. That said, if I was to go all in my wife might take a stab at me.
    SumoLegomadforLEGOFinal_SignbrickupdateGothamConstructionCoCapnRex101
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 14,216
    I once sent a nice letter requesting a Lego Retail Store franchise in 1998.

    Still waiting for a response...
    Farmer_JohnprevereGoldchains
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,769
    juggles7 said:
    @Pitfall69, do you know of even one person who is actually "making enough to quit their job"? I would find that hard to believe.  I tried to make a living off Lego, and had no limitations to startup capital, storage space, or my own time.  Still couldn't do it. There are many reasons, but the main one is that there are too many other people trying to do the same thing, underselling you, and willing to settle for peanuts.

    I doubt there are many people that make their living entirely from selling lego, but in many cases this is because you don't need to work long hours doing it to make a reasonable return. Which means you can do it alongside another job. It is not like you have to sit in a store all day waiting for a sale, like normal retail. Especially if you are in it for the long game, it is buy, wait for at least a year, sell. In this sense, it is like investing in stocks. Gains normally come by waiting rather than frantic work. Of course, some people may be able to find heavy discounted sales and flip in a day, but that makes it full time work.

    It is different if you part out sets such as in a bricklink store. I can think of at least ten UK BL store owners that do that as their full time job, and there are probably more that I don't know, and many, many more that do it as a supplement to their main income.

    Then there are the ebay sellers - again I can think of at least 10 that appear to be quite big time set sellers in the UK, along with many others that part out and sell minifigs on ebay and parts on BL or vice versa.
  • SuperTrampSuperTramp City 17Member Posts: 1,021
    Making a living is obviously different for everyone

    I know someone who can live on £600 a month and someone who needs £5k a month to just get by.
    FollowsCloselySethro3
  • Gavin83Gavin83 Member Posts: 251
    Pitfall69 said:
    In my 3+ years in the forum, I have seen this a lot. Heck, I even did it once. I could have bought the Imperial Flagship the whole time it was out, I even had it in my bag when Lego was blowing them out for $139. I never pulled the trigger. I ended up buying one for $300 from a fellow Bricksetter. How stupid I felt. 
    I can say the same thing about a lot of sets, which is why I try to purchase a single copy if I think perhaps maybe possibly I'm interested. In fact, there are several Hobbit sets that I am currently grabbing a copy of before they disappear for good.

    I wouldn't be surprised if resellers account for something like 25-35% of overall sales of the more expensive exclusive sets such as modulars. For the past two months, you can't buy a Palace Cinema or Pet Shop online if you're a normal customer. Resellers snap up any inventory at Target, Walmart and Amazon within minutes of them carrying stock.
    Wow! I realize you're talking about modulars, but I think your percentage are off by at leat 10X. Resellers just don't make that big of an impact.

    Just for fun, if TLG sold 221 million sets in 2009 (and those number are probably up 2-4X now), resellers account for 55-77 million sets each year? And if TLG's production is growing at a conservative 10% per year (which is more than reasonable based on their earnings growth), they would be producing nearly 400 million sets each year as of 2015 (this is definitely on the low side). That would mean in today's numbers, resellers would account for 100-140 Million (with a capital 'M') sets each year.

    Now let's say that (again, conservatively) 30% of these sales are through eBay and 30% are through Amazon. If each company makes an average of $10 per set per sale, we're talking about a annual revenue stream from resellers alone of $500M-$700M each year for each company.

    Throw in the fact that @LegoFanTexas is out of the picture, and I'm not having any. :)


    I don't think number of sets is a reasonable comparison, total revenue should be used instead. He gave his 25% estimate on big sets. Im imagining that the vast majority of sets sold are the smaller options which most sellers would avoid.

    Besides its all speculation. No one really knows what percentage of sales go to resellers. I happen to personally think its probably between the two of you but there simply isn't a way of knowing.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,769
    Gavin83 said:

    I don't think number of sets is a reasonable comparison, total revenue should be used instead. He gave his 25% estimate on big sets. Im imagining that the vast majority of sets sold are the smaller options which most sellers would avoid.
    I don't think that is true. Resellers sell to parents of kids as well as AFOLs. Smaller sets sell very well (you only need to look on ebay / amazon to see this), and these days are often the only ones heavily discounted so you can make a decent return on them. Of course, the monetary profit (as opposed to percentage profit) on a $20 set is much smaller than on a $200, and the admin / packing time for selling a $20 set is not that different to a $200 set. If a seller sets himself up to handle volume, smaller sets can make a decent return too.
  • Farmer_JohnFarmer_John USA - 4,035 Miles from 62 West Wallaby St., Wigan, Lancashire, UKMember Posts: 2,404
    ^I agree it's unknown; however, I think those of us posting in the resale thread give ourselves too much credit, which is an easy thing to do based on the prices being realized for some of the retired sets. I was just trying to lend some perspective based on actual Lego sales (albeit from 2009, which are very conservative numbers).

    Another interesting fact is that TLG is producing progressively larger and more expensive sets than they used to. That would generally indicate that a market exists for those. My point here is that while we assume resellers are to blame for driving prices up, it is more likely due to TLG seeing an opportunity to make more money in a single sale with large sets since people are obviously willing to part with their cash to buy them.

    JMO...
    FollowsCloselydougtsjuggles7
  • roxioroxio UKMember Posts: 1,360
    CCC said:
    Gavin83 said:

    I don't think number of sets is a reasonable comparison, total revenue should be used instead. He gave his 25% estimate on big sets. Im imagining that the vast majority of sets sold are the smaller options which most sellers would avoid.
    I don't think that is true. Resellers sell to parents of kids as well as AFOLs. Smaller sets sell very well (you only need to look on ebay / amazon to see this), and these days are often the only ones heavily discounted so you can make a decent return on them. Of course, the monetary profit (as opposed to percentage profit) on a $20 set is much smaller than on a $200, and the admin / packing time for selling a $20 set is not that different to a $200 set. If a seller sets himself up to handle volume, smaller sets can make a decent return too.
    ^This.
    With several year's experience of reselling this is the sort of model I try to use. Sure, I have several copies of most Modulars/UCS/exclusives for the long-haul, but I've also come to learn small/medium sets, chosen carefully and at the right buy-in, are very profitable. At first I would buy anything at 50% or more off (generic City, PQ etc) as I figured they were no-brainers.
    Break-even or tiny profits at best.
    @LFT pointed me in direction of first wave of red box Ninjago sets and I haven't looked back.
    Small/medium  (licenced) sets with exclusive figs and/or store exclusives or pretty much anything SW original trilogy.
    #6866
    #7868
    #9470
    #9471
    #9492
    #9493
    I've done very well off these. Current example #9490 which are selling for over 5.5 times my buy-in.
    Yes, quite a lot of work involved (sales of approx £20k p.a) and I'll never be looking at it as being able to replace full time employment. But a reliable second income from an extension of a enjoyable hobby. 
    Brickaholicthedingman5
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,769
    Unfortunately those sort of deals are probably long gone,or just very erratic.

    I remember when I first started reselling getting a JL price match for #6866 for £9 a go. I only bought six as I wasn't sure they'd be worth selling! Tesco also had #7593 for £5 and I only bought two, mainly for selling on the figures. What a fool.

    I didn't make the same mistake with #9471.


  • doriansdaddoriansdad CTCMember Posts: 1,337
    juggles7 said:
    @Pitfall69, do you know of even one person who is actually "making enough to quit their job"? I would find that hard to believe.  I tried to make a living off Lego, and had no limitations to startup capital, storage space, or my own time.  Still couldn't do it. There are many reasons, but the main one is that there are too many other people trying to do the same thing, underselling you, and willing to settle for peanuts. 

    Juggles there are quite a few in the Pacific Northwest that sell Lego online as their primary income. Alot also expand beyond Lego into other commodities, private label and product creation as once you have the space, knowledge and contacts to make good money each year through reselling Lego online then limiting yourself to one niche is well, quite limiting and inefficient. Everything required to run a successful Lego reselling business also translates well for almost any other commodity type product you can think of. Lego is just an easy way to get started as it is very easy to source, sells well and offers great margins. I also know 2 guys up here who have expanded online Lego reselling into a brick and mortar chain and have done very well for themselves.

    There really is no limit to what the brick can offer. As with any business if you participate in racing to the bottom you will go broke. As ecommerce and the number of resellers continues to skyrocket then naturally margins start to dwindle and it is time to adapt. As long as you know what margins you need to stay profitable and avoid items that do not offer those margins the niche will continue to offer good profits. I think there is tremendous opportunity in this space over the next 5 years to make very good money.
  • BrickaholicBrickaholic UKMember Posts: 342
    CCC said:
    Unfortunately those sort of deals are probably long gone,or just very erratic.

    I remember when I first started reselling getting a JL price match for #6866 for £9 a go. I only bought six as I wasn't sure they'd be worth selling! Tesco also had #7593 for £5 and I only bought two, mainly for selling on the figures. What a fool.

    I didn't make the same mistake with #9471.



    #6866 was just the best. I remember £13.40 as the magic figure as it was sold by Tesco for that price for 9 months solid online. Funny how 2- 3 years ago seems a lot longer.

    Recently i uncovered about 20 i thought i never had, it was like finding treasure.







     
  • Farmer_JohnFarmer_John USA - 4,035 Miles from 62 West Wallaby St., Wigan, Lancashire, UKMember Posts: 2,404
    ^Yeah...I remember Amazon have #6866 for roughly $15USD. Seemed like a great deal on a good set.
  • novicebuilder101novicebuilder101 Member Posts: 130
    I stand by my number. After what happened with Town Hall and the massively hoarded Fire Brigade, resellers will be holding around 25% of all Pet Shops and Palace Cinemas sold. Will it still make them money? Highly likely. If you can safely invest $150 and have that money double within 4 years, it's a no brainer for a reseller that has the cash and the storage space to accommodate. 

    I would estimate that 75% of the Pet Shops and Palace Cinemas sold in the past couple of months and onward are going right to resellers and we're at least a year away from the Palace Cinema's estimated retirement date. As for the smaller sets that aren't exclusives, I agree that resellers are just a drop in the bucket. That's why a popular smaller set is able to appreciate 3x, 4x (i.e. 4737 Quidditch Match, 7593 Buzz Lightyear) . Resellers don't hold large numbers of these sets because it's such a crapshoot to gauge demand on these.
  • doriansdaddoriansdad CTCMember Posts: 1,337
    ^ novice those numbers sound about right to me. With the large numbers of exclusives being stockpiled by an ever growing number of resellers long term buy and hold is becoming less effective every year. Obviously the surprise retirements will always yield great profits. Best to zig while everyone else is zagging IMO.
    juggles7
  • BrickaholicBrickaholic UKMember Posts: 342
    No one knows the numbers but my guess would be Resellers holding 2% of all  PC & PS sold worldwide. People who buy either to put in a cupboard for a few years and being content to get a 100% return will be considerably more without a doubt.

    Farmer_John
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,769
    ^^^ so you are essentially saying there is currently no collectors market for those modulars, if 75% of recent sales are to resellers.
  • pharmjodpharmjod 1,170 miles to Wall Drug, USAMember Posts: 2,916
    Not that there is no collector market. The collectors have no chance to get them. Just take a look at brickpicker. As soon as they pop into stock online it gets reported and people are notified by the stock tracker and they disappear within 5 minutes most of the time. As has been said before, there are people with bots that auto purchase those sets from specific stores when they show in stock. The average collector has little to no chance to pick these up anywhere but LEGO SAH these days.
  • novicebuilder101novicebuilder101 Member Posts: 130
    Even Lego SAH USA is constantly out of stock. Resellers have most of that inventory locked up as well. 

  • prevereprevere North of Bellville, East of Heartlake, South of Bricksburg, West of Ninjago City Member Posts: 2,923
    edited June 2015
    It's really not hard to get any of the active modulars, if you want one to collect.
    Dad
  • novicebuilder101novicebuilder101 Member Posts: 130
    ^^Yeah you can pay $200 on Amazon right now. I haven't seen Pet Shop in a store since November of 2014. I saw Palace Cinema once but the box was beat up. This is in CA so YMMV.
  • DawnDawn GoldMember Posts: 247
    Pet Ship is really not hard to get a RRP, I ordered 2 back to back for parts from S&H in late June and early June, yes they were on a 7-10 days delay but never an issue. Even now, still available for shipping in 10 days on [email protected]
  • Rainstorm26Rainstorm26 Chicago Burbs USA (and sometimes Ireland)Member Posts: 1,004
    I bought a PS from a local Lego store in Jan. 
  • BrickDancerBrickDancer Dunes of TatooineMember Posts: 3,639
    Has anybody who bought UCS Red Five on May 4th received it yet?
  • DawnDawn GoldMember Posts: 247
    @BrickDancer, I have not ... still backordered
  • juggles7juggles7 United StatesMember Posts: 452
    CCC said:
    I doubt there are many people that make their living entirely from selling lego, but in many cases this is because you don't need to work long hours doing it to make a reasonable return. Which means you can do it alongside another job. It is not like you have to sit in a store all day waiting for a sale, like normal retail. Especially if you are in it for the long game, it is buy, wait for at least a year, sell. In this sense, it is like investing in stocks. Gains normally come by waiting rather than frantic work. Of course, some people may be able to find heavy discounted sales and flip in a day, but that makes it full time work.
    If you are just accumulating targeted sets by purchasing online, then yes, this is not time-consuming work.  But, if in addition to new sets at retail, you are also buying old sets at Ebay (buy at one venue, sell at another), then you can spend a great deal of time monitoring and bidding on auctions.  You often have to communicate with buyers about the condition of their product (don't get me started), as well as how to package the item safely.  Very time-consuming. This would probably only work for a retiree with a pension, nothing but time on their hands, and an interest in doing it.  (Someone like me.)

    As for how much time this endeavor demands, the seasonality factor is getting stronger every year.  In previous years, I did well during the fourth quarter and stayed very busy from October through January.  After many months of slow sales, when the holidays neared, the business shifted into overdrive, and in the last weeks before Christmas, I was probably working 16 hours a day, at times.  Not only was I dropshipping, but was also moving a ton of packages as well.

    Then, during late 2014, the buying madness didn't even begin until a few days before Thanksgiving, and it hit with such force, I actually considered taking on a helper, paying some kid to help me pack and ship.  I didn't, but had to fill 70 orders one day, 90 another, that kind of thing.  It was exhilarating, but eventually exhausting.

    There used to be 3-4 months in which demand exceeded the available supply, and I was rockin' as a reseller.  Now the window of opportunity is only open 3-4 weeks a year.  I expect this to get even worse. 

    I think the high prices of sets are making more parents tell their kids they'll have to wait for Christmas to get their building sets.  More than once, I've overheard parents saying to kids while in the Lego aisle, "Ooh, that's expensive.  You're gonna have to wait for Christmas to get that."  Those same parents will be shocked when they later cannot find the item at retail, will keep looking, but finally give up as Christmas nears, paying a big premium for the set on the aftermarket. 

    Rather than fight the trend, I've been taking entire months (March, April) off, still accumulating a few sets but selling nothing.  I fully expect to be working my tail off for long hours during the holidays.  Adapt or perish; it is what it is. 
    BrickaholicFinal_SignRonyarMatthew
  • BrickDancerBrickDancer Dunes of TatooineMember Posts: 3,639
    @dawn I was afraid that was the case. Anybody else on Red Five?
  • BrickDancerBrickDancer Dunes of TatooineMember Posts: 3,639
    @Dawn Btw, did they still send you a Yularen?
  • DawnDawn GoldMember Posts: 247
    @BrickDancer yes I did, got it by USPS a few days after the order, tracking number was in the order page.
  • ZathrasZathras Member Posts: 70
    Brickdancer & Dawn - I ordered my copy of Red 5 in January from [email protected] and it finally shipped the second week of March this year.
  • BumblepantsBumblepants DFWMember Posts: 6,978
    I have called twice about my May 2nd Red 5. First time they said it would ship June 7th (it didn't) and yesterday they said on the 20th (not holding my breath)
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 14,216
    @TheLoneTensor's comments are 96.8% accurate 100% of the time.  Except 15% of the time when he's 78.2% correct.

    0% of Lego resellers had any idea that the TH would be 100% EOLed before the Pet Shop and Cinema.

    From a primary seller standpoint, this should lead one to believe the TH was a poor seller.  Or was a comparatively expendible product when compared to the remaining three sets.  (DO excluded.)
    Shib
  • BrickaholicBrickaholic UKMember Posts: 342
     
    Nice post @juggles7 

    This year has also seen the " custom " minifigures arrive which i imagine has hit the part out side of things which enabled those sellers to move inventory quite quickly.
    ebay seems to of turned into ebay China with many popular products listed first which are obviously fake ( Disney Frozen ) but selling in the 100's.

    pharmjod The Brickpicker effect has definately shown that most people are buying up the Exclusives, but i think that is more of a US thing than EU. That's the main reason i decided not to buy any from now on unless i could get some @ eol or on a discount.

    I prefer to be a Shepherd than a sheep




  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,769
    juggles7 said:
    CCC said:
    I doubt there are many people that make their living entirely from selling lego, but in many cases this is because you don't need to work long hours doing it to make a reasonable return. Which means you can do it alongside another job. It is not like you have to sit in a store all day waiting for a sale, like normal retail. Especially if you are in it for the long game, it is buy, wait for at least a year, sell. In this sense, it is like investing in stocks. Gains normally come by waiting rather than frantic work. Of course, some people may be able to find heavy discounted sales and flip in a day, but that makes it full time work.
    If you are just accumulating targeted sets by purchasing online, then yes, this is not time-consuming work.  But, if in addition to new sets at retail, you are also buying old sets at Ebay (buy at one venue, sell at another), then you can spend a great deal of time monitoring and bidding on auctions.  You often have to communicate with buyers about the condition of their product (don't get me started), as well as how to package the item safely.  Very time-consuming. This would probably only work for a retiree with a pension, nothing but time on their hands, and an interest in doing it.  (Someone like me.)

    Of course, you have to price your time. I simply wouldn't try to buy on one site and flip on another. Because (i) it is time consuming and (ii) there are better ways to make money on selling lego spending less time. If it works for you, then do it. Once you consider fees and postage, you have to be making probably at least 20% to even break even. Monitoring items looking for one offs that are under priced at the auction end is not worth it in my view (especially used items that you then need to check every brick). Part of the efficiency of selling (smaller) sets comes from having multiples of the same thing. No doubt there is money in finding a part complete old set, then checking the contents, then finding the parts to complete it, then photographing it, listing it, selling it. But that is quite different to selling new sets.
    Ronyar
  • Farmer_JohnFarmer_John USA - 4,035 Miles from 62 West Wallaby St., Wigan, Lancashire, UKMember Posts: 2,404
    73.6% of all statistics are made up.
    In general I agree; however, on this particular forum 27% of statistics are made up. I have the evidence, but I'm not going to share it with you. :wink: 
    FollowsCloselyRainstorm26dougtsRonyarsnowhitie
  • jcb193jcb193 Member Posts: 148

    I used to be a skeptic about "how high can prices go," but after seeing gen-xers pay thousands for rare comic books, 10s of thousands of dollars for Magic cards, etc, I don't think there is a ceiling. And these are the "middle class of collectors, not the millionaires.   As long as demand is high, people don't seem to have a limit on what they'll spend on a collectible they want. 

    I think maybe the family buyers, or people buying for their kid, might get lost, but the sole collector that has a "grail item."  Their pockets seem to run deeper every year.

  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,769
    73.6% of all statistics are made up.
    In general I agree; however, on this particular forum 27% of statistics are made up. I have the evidence, but I'm not going to share it with you. :wink: 
    That 27% only applies in the US though. In the UK we get up to 50% made up statistics about 15% of the time.
    dougts
  • pharmjodpharmjod 1,170 miles to Wall Drug, USAMember Posts: 2,916
    jcb193 said:

    I used to be a skeptic about "how high can prices go," but after seeing gen-xers pay thousands for rare comic books, 10s of thousands of dollars for Magic cards, etc, I don't think there is a ceiling. And these are the "middle class of collectors, not the millionaires.   As long as demand is high, people don't seem to have a limit on what they'll spend on a collectible they want. 

    I think maybe the family buyers, or people buying for their kid, might get lost, but the sole collector that has a "grail item."  Their pockets seem to run deeper every year.

    This is likely true for Retired sets or ones that are hard to find. I still think LEGO can and will eventually price themselves out of general sales if they are not careful. Making RRP of a set 30-40% higher than what it legitimately should be just so that stores can mark it down works to an extent. I believe the general public will not buy larger sets (the new space port, town square and shipwreck set come to mind) unless they are heavily marked down. I guess it could be a win for LEGO and retailers if the back end costs aren't actually increasing but it could eventually turn people off from the brand and really make openings for the clone brands.
  • Sethro3Sethro3 United StatesMember Posts: 819
    I ordered Red Five on May 2nd. At the time, it said ships in 30 days. So I knew I wouldn't receive it anytime soon. Thirty days came and went. If you look at the [email protected] listing, it says ships June 21 (like a lot of other exclusive sets). So who knows what will happen. I'm expecting it to get canceled because I'm sure it is retiring this year...we will wait and see.

    The unfortunate thing is if it does get canceled from [email protected], I have lost 6 weeks of time to get it from another venue...
  • binaryeyebinaryeye USMember Posts: 1,734
    jcb193 said:
    I used to be a skeptic about "how high can prices go," but after seeing gen-xers pay thousands for rare comic books, 10s of thousands of dollars for Magic cards, etc, I don't think there is a ceiling.
    I believe the only Magic cards that go for more than $10,000 are the Alpha and Beta versions of Black Lotus. Compared to a typical LEGO set, the supply of these is extremely small. The sets they are from were available for a combined four months. The print runs and distributions suggest there are about 1500 Alpha versions and about 4500 Beta versions in existence.
    madforLEGOBuriedinBricks
  • juggles7juggles7 United StatesMember Posts: 452
    SumoLego said:

    0% of Lego resellers had any idea that the TH would be 100% EOLed before the Pet Shop and Cinema.
    Not true. At least one did. The possibility of the TH being retired out of order was actually mentioned in this thread by LegoFanTexas. It was just mentioned as a possibility, nothing more, and with no real conviction.  The only reason that I even have one (just one) TH is that Amazon went out of stock, which got my attention, so I bought one from Target.  Amazon got them back in stock, I stopped thinking about TH, and within just a few weeks, they were gone gone gone.
  • pharmjodpharmjod 1,170 miles to Wall Drug, USAMember Posts: 2,916
    I kick myself. I ordered 8 from Wal-Mart when the panic started. Cancelled 4 of them out of fear and refused one damaged box at customer service. Still ended up with 7 to sell and one to keep but could have had 12 to sell. Oh well.
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 14,216
    Not to minimize LegoFanTexas's isolated suggestion, there was no widespread concensus of anything of the sort.
  • juggles7juggles7 United StatesMember Posts: 452
    I never said there was.

  • juggles7juggles7 United StatesMember Posts: 452
    @pharmjod, Wal_Mart allowed you to order 8 Town Halls?  12 Town Halls? Really? Because they usually have a limit of 2 on such items.  They limited my purchases of GE and HH to 2, always.

  • pharmjodpharmjod 1,170 miles to Wall Drug, USAMember Posts: 2,916
    edited June 2015
    Just place more than one order. At the time I think I was ordering multiples of 2 in hopes that they would ship in the original shipping container from LEGO. That did not happen. I only ordered 8 total from Wal-Mart at that time. The rest were gotten over time from various sources.
  • DadDad UKMember Posts: 816
    edited June 2015
     
    SumoLego said:
    Not to minimize LegoFanTexas's isolated suggestion, there was no widespread concensus of anything of the sort
    juggles7 said:
    I never said there was.


    On other forums there was. People were in the know that it was gone
  • pharmjodpharmjod 1,170 miles to Wall Drug, USAMember Posts: 2,916
    Yeah, I can tell you that I watched Wal-Mart go from having I think over a hundred in stock to 0 in about 8 hours or less due to the brickpicker frenzy. 
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