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Production runs of Modern Lego sets versus older Lego sets.

Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,444
This interesting topic came up in anorther thread and I thought it might be worth a discussion. 

Are production runs for Modern Lego sets longer than thst of sets made 30+ years ago? With all the talk about "when is The Death Star retiring?", it got me thinking Modern Lego sets having longer production lengths. 


Comments

  • dougtsdougts Oregon, USAMember Posts: 4,129
    I actually think it might be the opposite. Back in the 70s and 80s the pressure to release new toy models several times a year wasn't even remotely like today. The same classic town or classic space sets would be in catalogs and on shelves for years at a time in my recollection. And it was the same with other toys like Barbie, gi joe, etc

    Of course this is comparing run of the mill wide release themes from them and now. The D2C exclusives are a Different story and don't really an analog for comparison
    TXLegoguyVorpalRyu
  • oldtodd33oldtodd33 Denver 4800 miles to BillundMember Posts: 2,601
    The Lego Police station set #354 was released in 1972 and was advertised in their catalogs until it was replaced in 1976 by set #370. So about 4 years for that one, about the norm from what I remember. 
    VorpalRyu
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,444
    I took a quick look at medium to large sets(with minifigures) made in 1979 and their average lifespan was less than 3 years. I picked 1979 because that was the year I got my first large Lego set (Police Station) and have been in love with Lego ever since.
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,444
    edited April 2015
    Any data complied should exclude any set that wasn't widely available to the public, like certain store exclusives and conventions. I also wouldn't use CMF's in the data either. Yes, technically they are "sets", but I don't think they should be included.
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,444
    ^I also wouldn't include sets like #41999 or any IDEAS sets.
  • RailsRails Brierley Hill, UKMember Posts: 153
    On a tangent what is the set that was available for the longest period of time? Is it the Death Star?
  • FollowsCloselyFollowsClosely Member Posts: 1,034
    ^mindstorm?
  • NeilJamNeilJam USAMember Posts: 272
    Most sets in the 80s seemed to be available for about two years, which still seems to be the standard for the main themes like City and Star Wars.
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,444
    Looks like a job for @Farmer_John to make a chart ;)
    VorpalRyubobabricks
  • VorpalRyuVorpalRyu AustraliaMember Posts: 2,318
    Over here in Australia, back in the 70's & 80's, as I can recall, most retailers didn't readily throw Lego sets in the clearance bins. It was easily possible to find sets that were from three or four years prior, got #6890 for my seventh birthday (which was in June of 83), then a second one for christmas in 87.
    xiahna
  • natro220natro220 USAMember Posts: 545
    It did seem like sets stayed on the shelf longer back in the day.  I remember getting several sets released in 1987 according to Brickset, but I didn't fully get into Lego until 1989-1990.  I think there was much less competition for the shelf space back then...I mean, from 1987-1989, there was only Space, Castle and Town (and a few Technic here and there) on the shelf.  So I think old sets just stayed until they sold.  Nowadays, sets available at regular stores seem to last 1 year tops.
    Sethro3
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,275
    First of all the longest run for any LEGO model set was 15 years.... for the 1955-70 #236 Garage Set (#1236 in Denmark, Norway Sweden 1955-57).... which underwent 8 box types and probably as many design changes....





    This is arguably the most complex LEGO set, in terms of box content variations, box designs, and where the different versions were distributed.... all for a set that only had about 60 parts!! 

    From my Unofficial LEGO Sets/Parts Collectors Guide... the story of the complex First LEGO Garage Set....

    http://www.youblisher.com/p/729414-236-1236-LEGO-Garage-Set-of-1955-70/


    (Still having a special on it in Marketplace   :p









  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,275
    edited April 2015
    The length of time for a typical LEGO basic set was about 5 years in the 1950s, 4 years in the 1960s and 1970s and as little as 2 or 3 years in the 1980s.

    Generally... model sets were usually produced for about 3 years in the 1960s-1990s, with a few more popular ones produced for about 5 years.
    bluemodern
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,444
    ^That giant Lego boy creeps me out. Is he Denmarks version of the "Stay Puft Marshmallow Man" ? :)
    BumblepantschuckpkhmellymelSumoLego
  • Sethro3Sethro3 United StatesMember Posts: 819
    After getting back into LEGO as an adult, I went through brickset and marked all of the sets I own from looking at my instructions. Some were released years before I ever would have received a LEGO set, so I'm guessing they lasted at least 2-3 years on the shelf. Very odd, but interesting. I wish I could go back in time and look at those sets on the shelf through my eyes (or even as an adult perspective with the knowledge I have now).
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,275
    Pitfall69 said:
    ^That giant Lego boy creeps me out. Is he Denmarks version of the "Stay Puft Marshmallow Man" ? :)
    No, that's the LEGO Gnome, who was the LEGO mascot from 1955 until about 1963.  He appeared on LEGO boxes, LEGO stick pins, and even a LEGO doll, as seen here in Mint condition....



    I know some collectors who are looking for this doll, and are willing to pay more than $500 for it!!   :o

    SumoLego
  • khmellymelkhmellymel United KingdomMember Posts: 1,292
    ^ That IS rather creepy...
    scrumperBumblepantsPitfall69VorpalRyu
  • VorpalRyuVorpalRyu AustraliaMember Posts: 2,318
    edited April 2015
    ^ Second that!
    xiahna
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,444
    Can you imagine a poltergeist getting ahold of that abomination? The Horror!
    VorpalRyuSumoLego
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,275
    The LEGO Gnome was also available as a LEGO retailer shop window display....'


  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,275
    Well if that frightens you then there's the 1955-58 Esso Oil Drop Man....




    And the 1957-60 VW Shadow Man.....







  • Bosstone100Bosstone100 USAMember Posts: 1,434
    Esso. Anyone remember Sniglits? An Esso Asso was someone who pulled into a corner gas station and then pulls out the other side just to avoid having to stop at the traffic light.

    The only other one I remember is cinnamuck, which is the sticky stuff on the floor of a movie theater.
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,444
    edited April 2015
    Yes!!! Love "Sniglets" omg....I am showing my age.

    My favorite was "snorfing". It is when you have your face full of food and the waiter/waitress comes to your table and asks if everything is ok. Happens to me all the time.
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,275
    edited April 2015
    Hey!  This is a serious LEGO conversation and now it has deteriorated to a verbal....  

    ...oh wait.... what about "Strumbling"....   when you stumble on carpeting as though you were tripping on an imaginary object that is just not there.....  :p

    Those were American comedian Rich Hall's made up words...   My favorite saying of his...
     "Good things come to those who wait... but crap shows up right away!" :)
    SumoLegoPitfall69
  • xpokxpok PolandMember Posts: 31
    That LEGO mascot is like Chucky doll  :#
  • NeilJamNeilJam USAMember Posts: 272
    Still have some of the Sniglet dictionaries. I've often used "Cheetle" - the cheese dust left on your fingers after eating cheese flavored snacks such as Cheetos.
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,275
    xpok said:
    That LEGO mascot is like Chucky doll  :#
    Well then you probably would be aghast with Mucki and Macki  (pronounced moo-key and mah-key)... the famous German hedgehogs of Steiff doll fame.   :o


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