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Has anyone converted a garden shed for their collection and building?

TheBrickLaddTheBrickLadd Chippenham, Wilts, UK.Member Posts: 844
edited August 2014 in Collecting
Hi all,

I am looking for some inspiration and help regarding storing my collection. We dont have a very big house and sadly can't move at this time. Currently I have lego dotted around the house, I dont like it as it is and it generally looks untidy and my wife hates it.

I was wondering if anyone has converted a garden shed to store there collections and added electricity and insulation etc? Would love to see some pics if anyone has done this?

Thanks for your time.


Comments

  • drdavewatforddrdavewatford Hertfordshire, UKAdministrator Posts: 6,315
    edited August 2014
    teamladd said:


    I was wondering if anyone has converted a garden shed to store there collections and added electricity and insulation etc? Would love to see some pics if anyone has done this?

    I did consider something along these lines (a purpose-built, free-standing structure) a while back but quickly decided against it, the main reason being difficulty in adequately securing the structure and the likelihood that home contents insurance won't cover the loss in the event of theft.

    Unless you're in a position to properly secure the structure (padlocks etc. really won't cut it, and it'd be hard to fit anything remotely secure to a typical shed door) and fit an alarm then I think you'd be taking a significant risk.
  • Renegade007cjhRenegade007cjh Essex, UKMember Posts: 684
    ^ Agreed

    When looking at potential new homes a while back I entertained the idea of a stand-alone LEGO den, but soon dismissed it for the exact reasons drdavewatford mentions... I had enough trouble getting my collection insured when it was inside the home, let alone at the end of the garden! Have you considered a loft conversion? That way all the LEGO is stored under your roof (quite literally) and all the junk *ahem*... I mean all those valuable empty boxes, packaging and Christmas decorations currently residing there at the moment, could maybe find a new lease of life in the garden shed? Just a thought... otherwise, steal a bedroom!!
  • TheBrickLaddTheBrickLadd Chippenham, Wilts, UK.Member Posts: 844
    edited August 2014

    ^ Agreed

    When looking at potential new homes a while back I entertained the idea of a stand-alone LEGO den, but soon dismissed it for the exact reasons drdavewatford mentions... I had enough trouble getting my collection insured when it was inside the home, let alone at the end of the garden! Have you considered a loft conversion? That way all the LEGO is stored under your roof (quite literally) and all the junk *ahem*... I mean all those valuable empty boxes, packaging and Christmas decorations currently residing there at the moment, could maybe find a new lease of life in the garden shed? Just a thought... otherwise, steal a bedroom!!

    Sadly we only have a two bedroom, and the kids occupy the other one. :(

    I have thought of a loft conversion but our loft isnt that tall and think it would cost a fortune to get it sorted all out.

    Back to square one then I guess as security could be an issue.

    I guess I could look at a freestanding brick built structure and use a PVC door with locks etc.

  • MatthewMatthew Cheshire, UKAdministrator Posts: 3,734
    ^ If you're going to the trouble of that you might as well just put an extension on the house? No question of the insurance not covering it and you don't have to walk through the garden in the rain!
  • gold682gold682 UKMember Posts: 201
    I have just completed mine. Basically I needed a bigger shed generally, so decided to go the whole hog and create enough space for storing my Lego and a "work bench" for building. The "shed" is 7 metres wide, 3 metres deep and has 2 open "loft" areas for additional storage. The shed is fully insulated, walls, ceiling doors, with double glazed windows and insulated laminated flooring. This is not an off the shelf shed, in that I built it from scratch to cater for my garden dimensions. I used "log lap" for the exterior to give it a nicer look.
    I will probably use my oil filled rad for for keeping it warm in winter (has timer and thermostat and is relatively cheap to run).
    All in all, I have found this the best solution for my lego "obsession" and has the bonus of me being able to see exactly what i've got, as i want to get rid a lot of my Lego I have no interest in (decided to only collect UCS; Modulars; Hobbit/LOTR; HP and the "specials", such as exo-suit, ghostbusters, bttf etc.

    So my advice is go for it - your wife will love you for it :-)

    Cheers
    Paul
  • joel4motionjoel4motion United KingdomMember Posts: 959
    If you are looking for somewhere to build and keep your sets then ply-lining your loft to a half decent standard would be a good idea. I presume you'll sit when building so your building area could be in a lower part of the roof pitch. Shelving can be built to fit and you can get a half decent loft ladder for a few quid on eBay.

    If you want something more permanent, I have just finished a friends man-cave at the end of the garden. Fully lined, electric, upvc windows and doors, the works. Materials probably cost £4000 and my labour (few dinners and the odd beer) but it is quite decent. I'll try and load a picture when I get in tonight.
  • SuperTrampSuperTramp City 17Member Posts: 1,021
    I'm pretty sure you can get metal sheds with windows and double doors nowadays, they are more than secure. You would probably be looking at around £500 for a 10ft x 8ft.

    Have you a concrete base or flags to put the shed on?
  • SuperTrampSuperTramp City 17Member Posts: 1,021
    edited August 2014
    I also don't know what drdavewatford means by padlocks won't cut it?

    Some padlocks are that good the thieve would have to carry something like a Stihl saw or industrial bolt cutters to cut through the thing.

    Pretty unlikely IMO
  • KiwiLegoMeisterKiwiLegoMeister New ZealandMember Posts: 212

    ... I had enough trouble getting my collection insured when it was inside the home, let alone at the end of the garden!

    I work for an insurance company, and went through an exercise to value my collection. In essence,
    (1) I took original prices from BrickSet.com,
    (2) allowed for exchange rates and inflation and shipping,
    (3) Individually looked up recent sales for higher-value sets on our local auction site here in New Zealand;
    (4) Individually looked up current 'new' (incl. actual sales) prices on BrinkLink.com (and again allowed for exchange rate and shipping).

    The upshot of it is that my insurance company were happy to insure it @ replacement (as far as possible, using my inventory of sets), treat it is contents (as opposed to special collection), and complimented that I had done more than most people ever do when insuring a large collection.
    It's probably still under insured (at over $100,000NZD), but if / when flood waters hit, I'll feel better about writing it all off with a decent cheque.
    [I am on septic tank, so flooding would probably cause serious contamination].
    The other major risk is, of course, fire, where it would not take too-intense-a-heat to permanently damage the Lego.

    For flooding, I'd claim insurance for the lot, and then make sure I get a very low bid in for salvage (nothing illegal in doing that).
  • bobabricksbobabricks Vancouver, BC, CanadaMember Posts: 1,839
    If you need security you could always build a bunker. :P
  • Renegade007cjhRenegade007cjh Essex, UKMember Posts: 684

    ... I had enough trouble getting my collection insured when it was inside the home, let alone at the end of the garden!

    I work for an insurance company, and went through an exercise to value my collection. In essence,
    (1) I took original prices from BrickSet.com,
    (2) allowed for exchange rates and inflation and shipping,
    (3) Individually looked up recent sales for higher-value sets on our local auction site here in New Zealand;
    (4) Individually looked up current 'new' (incl. actual sales) prices on BrinkLink.com (and again allowed for exchange rate and shipping).

    The upshot of it is that my insurance company were happy to insure it @ replacement (as far as possible, using my inventory of sets), treat it is contents (as opposed to special collection), and complimented that I had done more than most people ever do when insuring a large collection.
    It's probably still under insured (at over $100,000NZD), but if / when flood waters hit, I'll feel better about writing it all off with a decent cheque.
    [I am on septic tank, so flooding would probably cause serious contamination].
    The other major risk is, of course, fire, where it would not take too-intense-a-heat to permanently damage the Lego.

    For flooding, I'd claim insurance for the lot, and then make sure I get a very low bid in for salvage (nothing illegal in doing that).
    I did some of that... I also have been photographing each and every set in my collection as well as scanning receipts all to prove what I own. It might be because I'm in the UK but some of the premiums were ridiculous!
  • B_HollsB_Holls Member Posts: 41
    I use the attic in my house like many of you have suggested, it works well
  • Brick_ObsessionBrick_Obsession in a "Brick" house - Calgary, AlbertaMember Posts: 654
    How much space do you have in your yard? If you were to build a shed how big would you build it?

    What would be really cool and somewhat of a trend these days is to buy a Sea-Can. You can run electricity to it for lighting, they are easy to lock. You can find someone to cut out a window or two if you like as well. They are a trend these days, just look at Sea-Can houses. They go for around $5000 CDN here.

    The only problem would be lifting the item into your yard and access. Some how I do not think that #8067 will get the job done.
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