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21110 Research Institute

17810121319

Comments

  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 18,714
    faefrost said:

    The Resource Institute and ExoSuit I believe only had initial runs of 10k pieces. I kind of suspect that that will be it for the ExoSuit.

    Nobody (outside of lego) knows what the production numbers are. There has been speculation that a run is 10K, but there is no proof. It could equally well be 20K, or 40K in 10K monthly batches. Nobody knows.
    madforLEGOAdeelZubair
  • BrickDancerBrickDancer Dunes of TatooineMember Posts: 3,639
    That 10k number came from Perijove's guess regarding the Rover. That's as close as we got to official info on that one.
  • InfinitymanInfinityman United StatesMember Posts: 116
    Went to the LEGO store near Detroit on Saturday, and they were sold out. Glad I decided to order that evening!
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 9,711
    I think anyone saying they think these sets are done have 5-10 (or more) sitting in their closet and HOPING they are done so they can sell them off to desperate people, but The Exo suit is coming back (Someone in another thread posted LEGOs response about making more of them) and I'm guessing they are not letting something new that sold out in a week (The RI) stay 'sold out'
    Again the RI is just a feeling but again I think LEGO learned with the Minecraft set that if it sells keep making em. Besides if they stop RI now the backlash from all of those championing the set would be a bit harsh, considering all of this Shell GP shenanigans going on that LEGO already has to deal with.
  • tamamahmtamamahm Member Posts: 1,962
    Semantic issue and I'm being very word picky. Catered means to supply what is desired or required. There is also the connotation that it is an overt action on the part of the person catering, as opposed to an accidental action. If a school caters to children with learning difficulties, they aren't simply accidentally meeting their needs. They are understanding what is needed and supplying what is desired or required.

    Lego has marketed to boys for years. They catered their products and multiple lines to boys based on what they learned about how boys play. Until recently they had not even done research on how girls played (unlike the analysis they did on boys far earlier), so they definitely were not catering to girls. Their main model has been, cater to boys and throw in the occasional female and we might catch some girls. (Yes, I will argue there are a couple of exceptions to that.)


    "There were girl fans of Lego before Friends, they were catered for."

    Yes, there were girl fans of Lego before Friends.
    Being a fan, doesn't necessarily equate to being catered to.
    Were there girls that found what they needed or required? Definitely.
    Were there girl fans that could not find what they needed or required? Definitely.

    Is there a wide range of girls between the one that wants the big monster city truck and the one that wants the girly girl salon? Most definitely, and that is where I have seen many girls fall.


    Xefan said:

    CCC said:

    There were girl fans of Lego before Friends, they were catered for.

    Agreed and I actually think they were better. When I was a kid my sister loved the horses, IIRC wasn't there even a Lego riding school? I'm sure she had something like that, or at least built one herself. No need for all this pink crap back then, girls seemed to appreciate it and be as creative with it as boys just fine!
    How is that being catered to? They did not have what she needed or required which was in her case was a horse riding stable, so she ended up needing to build her own.

    Appreciating Lego, being a fan of Lego and being creative with Lego does not necessarily equate to being catered to. Those are very different things.

    If that was the case, then Lego could have simply skipped all sets, and just sold plan bricks and parts, and then we could say everyone has been catered to because people can make what they want. That is not what Lego did. They created a wide range of themes marketed and catered to boys.


    BOBJACK_JACKBOB
  • BrickDancerBrickDancer Dunes of TatooineMember Posts: 3,639
    I do not think it is fair to say that Lego has not considered or analyzed girls before. It is obvious that they have and have valiantly tried to cater to the little ladies over the decades. They just haven't got good traction until the Friends line really honed in on what girls like (the color pink, themes of shopping, pets and food, etc.).

    Below is a list of the specific girl-centric lines they've experimented with in the past for a total of 58-years worth (with overlapping time). This is not even counting those that are usually deemed non-gendered like City/Town, Creator, Holidays, etc.

    Homemaker = 1971 to 1974 (4 years)
    Fabuland = 1979 to 1989 (11 years)
    Scala = 1979 to 2001 (13 years)
    Paradisa = 1992 to 1997 (6 years)
    Belville = 1994 to 2008 (15 years)
    Clickits = 2003 to 2006 (4 years)
    Friends = 2012 to Current (3 years)
    Disney Princess = 2014 to Current (1 year)

    So the question isn't whether or not Lego has tried to give the girls what they want. The question is why they weren't successful until Friends/Princesses?
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 18,714
    To add to that ...

    Are there boys that find what they need or require? Definitely.
    Are there boys that cannot find what they need or require? Definitely.




    As for marketing, take a set like this one ...

    image

    Is this being marketed towards boys or girls?

    I think neither. It is being marketed towards those that enjoy engineering type hobbies. Now many more of those will be boys rather than girls, as engineering ends to be a more male hobby and career. There is nothing to say that girls cannot play with that type of set, and girls that are engineering minded and likely to go into engineering later on will more likely be interested in that set than a boy that doesn't like engineering.

    Creator sets, the same. There are a whole range of sets, some will be marketed towards children that like animals, others towards children that like cars. There are a lot of vehicles in the range. But just because more boys than girls like cars doesn't mean that these sets are targeted towards boys. There is nothing stopping girls playing with a car. They are being marketed towards children that like playing with vehicles.

    A bigger problem, of course, comes with sets with minifigs in.

    image

    Is it aimed at a boy or a girl? The minifig to me looks like a boy, due to the hair provided. This is one place I believe lego should change. Provide a female hairpiece, and that figure could easily be either sex. If that change was made, it would be equally aimed at boys and girls, this time ones that like building houses.

    What about this recent set?

    image

    Is it aimed at a boy or a girl? There is a minifig of each sex, so all children can identify with someone in the set of the same sex as them. I think this one is aimed equally at boys and girls, this time ones that like fire engines. Again, more boys are going to like fire engines that girls, but that doesn't mean it is aimed at boys rather than girls. It is aimed at children that like fire engines.

    There are of course sets that contain few or no female minifigs and I think that should change. But should the subject matter of those sets change? I think not, not if there isn't a big enough market for them.

    If lego decides not to do, say, a horse stable in the city range as they don't believe it will sell well, it is not that they are not aiming city sets at girls, but that they do not believe such a set will sell well to both boys and girls if made in the city range. The same subject might sell well in the Friends range, since that range also attracts many girls that like pastel colours and dolls rather than minifigs, who would not buy city sets.
    dougtstomahawkerpharmjodsidersdd
  • oceanangeloceanangel Member Posts: 149
    If I ever have a daughter, I'm never letting her know about the friends range, ever. I just see Lego as unisex and luckily so did my mum but she liked playing with them as well so that was prpbs factor in her getting me them. Mind she did also let me have transformers. And I intend to follow her example by letting my kid have whatever toys they want. Apart from the friends range. The line must be drawn and I draw it there.

  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,866
    edited August 2014

    If I ever have a daughter, I'm never letting her know about the friends range, ever. I just see Lego as unisex and luckily so did my mum but she liked playing with them as well so that was prpbs factor in her getting me them. Mind she did also let me have transformers. And I intend to follow her example by letting my kid have whatever toys they want. Apart from the friends range. The line must be drawn and I draw it there.

    "letting my kid have whatever toys they want."

    I think drawing an arbitrary line sort of invalidates that whole message. The Friends sets are good quality sets. I own a few, and they're not a daughter's, or a sister's, or a parent's. They're mine and my brother's, because they were superb designs.

    If you think LEGO is unisex, then why exclude just "girl-oriented" sets? Why not also exclude "boy-oriented" sets like Ninjago, BIONICLE, or Hero Factory? A lot of girls are fans of these themes, but they're still very definitely targeted at boys.
    pharmjoddougts
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,098

    If I ever have a daughter, I'm never letting her know about the friends range, ever.

    I love it when someone says "If I ever..." and "I'm never" and "...ever". When you eventually have a daughter (or kids even) you'll learn that whatever you might have thought prior to them will be proved invalid.
    pharmjodtamamahmdougtsvwong19maquesnivam
  • 12651265 Member Posts: 953
    mathew said:

    If I ever have a daughter, I'm never letting her know about the friends range, ever.

    I love it when someone says "If I ever..." and "I'm never" and "...ever". When you eventually have a daughter (or kids even) you'll learn that whatever you might have thought prior to them will be proved invalid.
    Appreciate the lessons of life Dear Abby. ;)
  • pharmjodpharmjod 1,170 miles to Wall Drug, USAMember Posts: 2,911
    I can 100% agree with @mathew on that point though.
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,098
    edited August 2014
    The whole Friends outrage is idiotic. Do you see any men (I'm not talking wimpy guys who like My Little Pony) complaining about the proliferation of war toys? No, you don't.
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,405
    Are all men that like My Little Pony wimpy? That might be like saying that all females like pink.
    pharmjodCircleKtedwardBuriedinBricks
  • 12651265 Member Posts: 953
    mathew said:

    If I ever have a daughter, I'm never letting her know about the friends range, ever.

    I love it when someone says "If I ever..." and "I'm never" and "...ever". When you eventually have a daughter (or kids even) you'll learn that whatever you might have thought prior to them will be proved invalid.
    And you are the judge and jury for others to think and believe. One person's views and values differ from others. Everyone has an opinion and how they approach things, so telling someone what they should think is absurd. Life your own life, while others live theirs.
  • legomattlegomatt Member Posts: 2,548
    edited August 2014
    ^ I don't think he was trotting out the old 'until you XYZ you know nothing about XYZ' line (though he might hold to that belief also, who knows...). But from the post, I think he was simply saying, when it comes to kids, the 'plan' never survives the test of battle, so when such intentions are expressed, they always raise in him the somewhat wry smile of 'Just you wait and see...'.

    :o)
  • CrowkillersCrowkillers Member Posts: 757
    edited August 2014
    It's discussions like this that make me happy that I build with Technic...

    Just out of curiosity, does anyone know how many female designers work for Lego..? I was curious what the ratio of male to female designers was...

    rocketeer53
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 18,714
    To not allow a child to know about Friends means banning them from toy stores, grocery stores that sell Lego, looking at Lego catalogues and the website, the library in case they have the story books, playing at friends houses in case they have Friends, ...

    Good luck with that.
  • SirKevbagsSirKevbags Fairy Land Member Posts: 4,030
    Someone with a better memory can confirm this but if we cast our minds back to AFOLCON in 2012 and the talk by Mads Nipper, didn't he say the biggest issue with girls was actually the minifigs? Girls, in general and obviously not all of them don't like how minifigs look. They prefer the more realistic faces etc of the mini dolls. More of the kids spoke and LEGO listened so they could sell more sets.


    LostInTranslationSilentModePitfall69dougts
  • graphitegraphite USMember Posts: 3,263
    ^^^ I don't know how many but I know there is that one beautiful blonde. Something she makes needs a designer video again soon.
  • XefanXefan Member Posts: 1,149
    tamamahm said:

    How is that being catered to? They did not have what she needed or required which was in her case was a horse riding stable, so she ended up needing to build her own.

    They didn't have an attack helicopter set for me either due to Lego's no military ethos which is something most boys like (hence why games like Call of Duty sell tens of millions of copies every single year), I had to build it myself. Does that mean they didn't cater to boys either?

    But regardless, well done on ignoring the bit of my post that said I think it may have been a purchased set, turns out it was:

    www.peeron.com/inv/sets/6379-1

  • tamamahmtamamahm Member Posts: 1,962
    Brickdancer my point about analyzing girls that they had analyzed how boys had played years before. I tried tracking down the article last night, and it is really annoying me that I can not find it. They analyzed girls later. If they put their effort on analyzing boys, it seems their focus was on creating toys for boys. It does not mean they did not try to put out things for girls, but putting out an item for a gender is not the same as catering to a gender. Some of their attempts for items for females was definitely not items they desired or required. Flip the situation... Lego had taken the direction of analyzing girls first, and put out pastel lines such as Friends, Princess, a fairy line, a woodland nature line, a vet line, school line, playground line, monster high line, Dora line, resort line, Frozen, etc. Etc. If their sets had a predominance of female minifigs, and over the years they tried to put out a line of pastel cars which failed, or Maybe a click-it line of boy watches... Maybe they had some gender neutral buildings with a female minifig. Maybe they put out a pastel technic kitten with engineered legs that moved. If the situation was reversed, I would be saying Lego catered to girls and not to boys. I would not be saying that kittens are gender neutral or that look Lego tried a few items for boys that failed. For me catering is about who are they aiming their products at, because that is who they are focusing on supplying their products to, who they are trying to make sets for. Are we really trying to state that Lego has not primarily focused their products at boys over the years?
    As said, though, I think this is all a semantic issue, and we are interpreting cater differently from each other.

    CCC, I get your argument, but I would disagree. Lego put out a fire truck because they were targeting their primary consumer... Boys. They were specifically creating and supplying an item for their target audience, boys. My son like some of their Friends jungle sets. That does not mean that they were targeting and catering to kids that like jungle animals and adventure, as opposed to targeting and catering to girls. Mindstorms. Look at the items they chose to create directions for... Creature predominantly historically boy-oriented, such as snake, scorpion, Dino, vehicles. They were not targeting kids that like snakes.they are not targeting kids that like engineering. They are targeting boys that like engineering with that set. If the creations in Lego Mindstorms were kitten, monkey, unicorn, gymnast, ice cream truck then I would be saying they are targeting and catering to girls that like engineering and not simply to all kids that like unicorns or all kids that like engineering. Such a set may appeal to some boys, but it does not mean boys are being catered to. Boys may be fans of Lego, but again, that does not mean that set is catering to them.

    I think neither. It is being marketed towards those that enjoy engineering type hobbies. Now many more of those will be boys rather than girls, as engineering ends to be a more male hobby and career. There is nothing to say that girls cannot play with that type of set, and girls that are engineering minded and likely to go into engineering later on will more likely be interested in that set than a boy that doesn't like engineering.

    I will also disagree. My kids are at a school that focuses on engineering, and I will say that many girls interested in engineering would have no desire for such a set. Agreed, some will be interested in the set. Now, I could argue that girls interested in engineering would have more desire for the set than girls not interested in engineering. I would not state more girls interested in engineering would desire this set over boys not interested in engineering. Big red truck. I think many boys would like, and that becomes the larger selling factor than whether it is technic or not.
    Of course, they created a big red truck. They did not create a technic kitten. They did not create a technic swing or carousel. They did not create a technic horse or unicorn. They went with an item that would appeal most to their target audience of boys. They catered the set towards boys. The set was not created simply to cater to the generic kid that likes engineering. Catering towards boys does not mean there are not some girls that would like the set.
    Xefan said:


    But regardless, well done on ignoring the bit of my post that said I think it may have been a purchased set, turns out it was:

    www.peeron.com/inv/sets/6379-1

    That is not called ignoring. That is called being In a hurry and reading your point completely wrong. ;-) My mistake. Sorry. I read it as they did NOT have anything like that, so she her only choice was to build something generic out of bricks instead. I was trying to figure out how not supplying what your sister wanted was considered catering.
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,098
    legomatt said:

    ^ I don't think he was trotting out the old 'until you XYZ you know nothing about XYZ' line (though he might hold to that belief also, who knows...). But from the post, I think he was simply saying, when it comes to kids, the 'plan' never survives the test of battle, so when such intentions are expressed, they always raise in him the somewhat wry smile of 'Just you wait and see...'.

    :o)

    Yes. Is a parent of a girl going to tell her that she can't have Olivia's House but she can have the Creator Family House? Just because the Family House meets the parent's skewered gender-political world view?
  • tamamahmtamamahm Member Posts: 1,962

    If I ever have a daughter, I'm never letting her know about the friends range, ever. I just see Lego as unisex and luckily so did my mum but she liked playing with them as well so that was prpbs factor in her getting me them. Mind she did also let me have transformers. And I intend to follow her example by letting my kid have whatever toys they want. Apart from the friends range. The line must be drawn and I draw it there.

    I wanted to pull this out separately.
    Why? All my kids, no matter gender, have loved the friends animal series. Some of the new Jungle sets all my kids have found appealing. What element of Friends is causing a line to be drawn? Because it uses additional colors? Because they use ladyfigs? Many sets out there are not being marketed as unisex. Not just Friends. Take the old Atlantis sets from a. Few years back. Sure anyone can play with, but their focus groups consisted of predominantly boys 6-12. I guess I am trying to understand what element in these are making them not unisex, while saying the other lines are unisex. In my mind many Lego themes are produced with a target gender in mind,and catered to that gender, so I am unclear why other sets are fine, but Friends suddenly is not.



  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,098
    The interesting thing about the Friends sets is that they are actually more realistic then many 'gender neutral' sets including the Modulars. At least Olivia's House has a bathroom. I'm not sure where the patrons of the Palace Cinema go after chugging their 42 oz. Diet Cokes. Maybe out one of the open windows?
    tamamahmpharmjodAdeelZubair
  • DiggydoesDiggydoes Cologne/GermanyMember Posts: 1,079
    Hmm don't know why,but now i want a pastell technic kitten with moving legs! ;)
    tamamahmBrickDancermargotricecake
  • alijoezacalijoezac UK, NottinghamMember Posts: 522
    Wow! News of the Research Institute shortage makes today's Guardian!
  • tamamahmtamamahm Member Posts: 1,962
    mathew said:

    The interesting thing about the Friends sets is that they are actually more realistic then many 'gender neutral' sets including the Modulars. At least Olivia's House has a bathroom. I'm not sure where the patrons of the Palace Cinema go after chugging their 42 oz. Diet Cokes. Maybe out one of the open windows?

    Agreed. I suspect part of that realism comes from the focus on details. In general I am a fairly large fan of Friends. (Now, there are a few items with the line I am not a fan of, but I tend to ignore those.) I personally think it has been one of the lines with the most innovation/creativity we have seen from Lego.
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,405
    edited August 2014
    The Brownstone from the Pet Shop has a bathroom. The Simpsons House has a bathroom.

    Lego isn't going to put a bathroom in every set to add realism. Jack Bauer never goes to the bathroom in the 24 Hours he's fighting terrorists.
  • Brick_ObsessionBrick_Obsession in a "Brick" house - Calgary, AlbertaMember Posts: 654
    For what it is worth, my Lego store here in town is still getting shipments. They just finished selling the last of the shipment that arrived last week. They are expecting more in 2 weeks.

    What I see here is that Lego just may have been a little tentative with the #21110 not knowing how well they would sell. Better to have less on the market than more. Less does not hurt them, only impatient people. Having more on the market and no buyers hurts Lego.

    I am positive there will be more very shortly.
    Pitfall69lego007AdeelZubair
  • monkeyhangermonkeyhanger Member Posts: 2,939
    Pitfall69 said:

    The Brownstone from the Pet Shop has a bathroom. The Simpsons House has a bathroom.

    Lego isn't going to put a bathroom in every set to add realism. Jack Bauer never goes to the bathroom in the 24 Hours he's fighting terrorists.

    Maybe Jack Bauer has a proper drinkers bladder? I can usually do in 7 pints at the pub before I need to pay a visit. :0)

    Pitfall69
  • oceanangeloceanangel Member Posts: 149
    Aanchir said:

    If I ever have a daughter, I'm never letting her know about the friends range, ever. I just see Lego as unisex and luckily so did my mum but she liked playing with them as well so that was prpbs factor in her getting me them. Mind she did also let me have transformers. And I intend to follow her example by letting my kid have whatever toys they want. Apart from the friends range. The line must be drawn and I draw it there.

    "letting my kid have whatever toys they want."

    I think drawing an arbitrary line sort of invalidates that whole message. The Friends sets are good quality sets. I own a few, and they're not a daughter's, or a sister's, or a parent's. They're mine and my brother's, because they were superb designs.

    If you think LEGO is unisex, then why exclude just "girl-oriented" sets? Why not also exclude "boy-oriented" sets like Ninjago, BIONICLE, or Hero Factory? A lot of girls are fans of these themes, but they're still very definitely targeted at boys.
    It was just me joking about how much the freinds line annoys me, i learnt well from my mum and wpuld let my kid have whatever they want.

    I guess sometines my humor fails to work online.
    Pitfall69
  • oceanangeloceanangel Member Posts: 149
    mathew said:

    If I ever have a daughter, I'm never letting her know about the friends range, ever.

    I love it when someone says "If I ever..." and "I'm never" and "...ever". When you eventually have a daughter (or kids even) you'll learn that whatever you might have thought prior to them will be proved invalid.
    Sadly, its gonna prove difficult for me to have kids. Unless i adopt or clone myself which is my long term plan.
  • oceanangeloceanangel Member Posts: 149
    tamamahm said:

    If I ever have a daughter, I'm never letting her know about the friends range, ever. I just see Lego as unisex and luckily so did my mum but she liked playing with them as well so that was prpbs factor in her getting me them. Mind she did also let me have transformers. And I intend to follow her example by letting my kid have whatever toys they want. Apart from the friends range. The line must be drawn and I draw it there.

    I wanted to pull this out separately.
    Why? All my kids, no matter gender, have loved the friends animal series. Some of the new Jungle sets all my kids have found appealing. What element of Friends is causing a line to be drawn? Because it uses additional colors? Because they use ladyfigs? Many sets out there are not being marketed as unisex. Not just Friends. Take the old Atlantis sets from a. Few years back. Sure anyone can play with, but their focus groups consisted of predominantly boys 6-12. I guess I am trying to understand what element in these are making them not unisex, while saying the other lines are unisex. In my mind many Lego themes are produced with a target gender in mind,and catered to that gender, so I am unclear why other sets are fine, but Friends suddenly is not.





    It was a failed joke.
    tamamahm
  • oceanangeloceanangel Member Posts: 149

    Someone with a better memory can confirm this but if we cast our minds back to AFOLCON in 2012 and the talk by Mads Nipper, didn't he say the biggest issue with girls was actually the minifigs? Girls, in general and obviously not all of them don't like how minifigs look. They prefer the more realistic faces etc of the mini dolls. More of the kids spoke and LEGO listened so they could sell more sets.


    Wow, really? As a kid, i loved the minifigs like mad. I used to use them with my transformers as they seemed to young fizzy drink addled brain to be more in scale.
  • 12651265 Member Posts: 953
    @ oceanangel The internet PC folks are so amusing.
    Pitfall69
  • oceanangeloceanangel Member Posts: 149
    CCC said:

    To not allow a child to know about Friends means banning them from toy stores, grocery stores that sell Lego, looking at Lego catalogues and the website, the library in case they have the story books, playing at friends houses in case they have Friends, ...

    Good luck with that.


    I plan to offer macdonalds, chocloate and soda with the nonfriends lego, im gonna be the best mum ever lol. Hmmm, maybe i should test this plan out on my best friends kid, the friends stuff annoys her as well, im sure she would thank me for it........
    1265
  • legomattlegomatt Member Posts: 2,548
    @oceanangel Plenty (possibly everyone) knew you were joking. Don't worry, it's just the nature of these debate-heavy threads, that some get so caught up in the adversarial nature of debate they momentarily lose focus and briefly defend/attack anything said.

    It happens in real life, too: for example, a heated meeting interrupted by someone bringing a tray of biscuits... suddenly an irrelevance becomes a point of contention, such as the biscuits or just the very act of opening the door (i DID knock - you were all too busy shouting!). Then someone else walks in and asks 'what the blazes are we all arguing about biscuits for?'. Nobody knows. A moment's silence. Original debate resumes. :o)

    Actually, if you know someone who 'goes off on one', you can often have a bit of fun by slipping in a random word midst rant; they'll often pick up on it and launch into the craziest of tangents. Hah! :oD
    Shib
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,405
    ^In the "States", if I was having a heated discussion and someone walked up to us with biscuits; I would ask "What the f**k are you doing?" or "Is there any honey with that?"
    binaryeye
  • legomattlegomatt Member Posts: 2,548
    ^ Oh, but it's the height of manners to present a tray of biscuits to quarreling foes... it is my understanding that every council chamber across the land grinds to a total halt if biscuits aren't present.
    The number of times I've heard people complaining they couldn't get a good finger off the tea-person. ;oP
  • tamamahmtamamahm Member Posts: 1,962
    I do Not think it is about getting caught up in debate heavy threads. Sometime things do not translate well in text without tone and sometime it is easy to translate it in multiple ways. It also depends on how people read text, and that really just depends on the individual.

    Mmmm.... Biscuits. ;-) Honey is not even needed.
    Pitfall69
  • legomattlegomatt Member Posts: 2,548
    edited August 2014
    legomatt said:

    the nature of these debate-heavy threads, that some get so caught up in the adversarial nature of the debate they momentarily lose focus and briefly defend/attack anything said.

    tamamahm said:

    I do Not think it is about getting caught up in debate heavy threads. Sometime things do not translate well in text without tone and sometime it is easy to translate it in multiple ways. It also depends on how people read text, and that really just depends on the individual.

    :o)
  • CrowkillersCrowkillers Member Posts: 757
    edited August 2014
    Can't wait for the world to lose it's mind when Lego releases the highly controversial "Olivia goes all the way" Friends set...
    Shib1265Pitfall69
  • legomattlegomatt Member Posts: 2,548
    ^Will it include a sausage?
    dougtsPitfall69ricecake
  • CrowkillersCrowkillers Member Posts: 757
    edited August 2014
    legomatt said:

    ^Will it include a sausage?

    Oh yeah....

    The set will come with boyfriend Mitch and a hand-me-down car that he received from his parents that he modded up to pick up chics...
    Pitfall69
  • CrowkillersCrowkillers Member Posts: 757
    But that won't have anything on the other 2015 Friends set with Emma and Stephanie called "Curious in College"

    I heard the college dorm room playset that you build is on the campus of Shell University....

    Pitfall69
  • tamamahmtamamahm Member Posts: 1,962
    Yes, I did get that point even when posting legomatt. ;-) I did still think it was valid to mention, though. Tone really is hard to translate. It is something I find fascinating, actually.

    I really would love some biscuits and gravy now for breakfast.
    legomatt
  • ShibShib UKMember Posts: 5,322
    I have some American friends who love here in the UK and once when we were staying with them they offered us biscuits and gravy for breakfast, my girlfriend looked really confused but I was vaguely aware what biscuits mean to an American.
    For those in the UK, they are somewhere between a scone and a break roll.
    For those in the US, biscuits to us are cookies...imagine cookies and gravy!
    tamamahm
  • CrowkillersCrowkillers Member Posts: 757
    What flavor is the gravy..?
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