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Predictions on Discontinuing Sets and their Secondary Market Value

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  • tamamahmtamamahm Member Posts: 1,937

    tamamahm said:

    That is great Pitfall, and there is nothing that says that girls do not like fire trucks, but yes, there are many that do not have interest there. (Even my son has no interest there. ;-) ) If there was a strong interest with girls and their fire trucks, we would not have a need of Lego Friends. As has been discussed many times on this board Lego Friends has gone after those that are not already interested in Lego and/or those that have not found the themes of interest in the Lego line because Lego does focus many of their lines on more traditional areas of boy interests. Great. They attracted a new demographic. The key now is maintaining, renewing and building that demographic, or you lose it.

    I have to be blunt and say I don't know what you mean by this? I think TLG did a fantastic job in creating a Friends theme. I don't see it as their responsibility to "maintain" as though it's some crop. I think it's unfair to assume everything has to go in another direction all together when this general business model has functioned just fine for decades.

    Id say overall I am incredibly "middle of the road" I do and enjoy just as many manly fixing up things around the house type stuff as I do sitting and reading a book and enjoying a cup of tea. I think of gender especially when it comes to stereotypes, very little if at all.

    Unfortunately I don't see where any of this is coming from and I think people need to have a larger perspective rather than one narrow thought process.

    I really do not see how stating basic business is being narrow.
    I am not sure I can be more plain with what I am saying.
    Lego saw a segment where they were not getting sales. They took step 1 in broadening and achieving a new demographic. Girls make up ~50% of the kids out there, and if they can even attain a portion of that they really grow their bottom line.

    A company, though, can not just call it done, or they lose that demographic after the initial luster is over. Yes, it IS the responsibility of a company to maintain. That is basic business 101. Why do you think we have updates to City? Why does Lego put out new police sets? Why does Lego create new licenses, and phases out old ones?
    It's because kids are fickle, and when the next new items comes, they hop on board.

    This is no different than any other toy company or line. Barbie, American Girl, Imaginext, Playmobil, Hotwheels, etc. They are constantly updating, revamping to maintain their market.
    Toy companies, though, have to maintain a balance between 'classic' and new. Thus, we see Lego consistently with police/city, and yet yearly new items in that line... Arctic, Coast Guard, Mining.

    If Lego wants to maintain or expand the growth they achieved via Lego Friends, they have to do the same that they have done in their other lines. Lego Friends was great, and probably one of the more creative of the lines they have going, but there was a focus on buildings/horses. In my area, I was beginning to see interest fade. As cool as a juice bar was... the interest was lower here, but interest in a Cruise ship was high, because it was new and different.
    The core of shops/horses, though, is important, in that in maintains your core and upcoming kids, but you have to revamp....just like the City line has to revamp.

    You either do that in a line, like City has done, by creating subthemes, and/or you do that by creating additional lines. Jungle is definitely a subtheme and should shake things up a bit. New, different, and they interconnect to make a larger set.

    The most successful toy lines, though, do both. They create subthemes, but completely new lines as well.





  • dougtsdougts Oregon, USAMember Posts: 4,112
    wagnerml2 said:

    The dichotomy of Lego trains is very weird. They always sell well ...

    Do they? I don't know that I would assume this to be true. The fact that LEGO only releases new CITY trains every 3 or 4 years seems to imply the opposite might be true. I also don't think that just because they sell enough copies of a full train set (Cargo or Passenger) that this means there is a huge market for add-ons and one-off cars. I would guess the majority of kids who get these get the set and play with it, and couldn't care less about adding on other cars and trains like model railroaders do.

    I sometimes wonder even if LEGO only keeps putting out the basic CITY train sets just because they feel like they always need to have one for sale just to fill the slot - much like a police station - not because they sell a ton of them.

    Of course everyone - kids included - LOVE the big train layout displays at shows and conventions. But this shoudn't be mistaken for market demand. Only a tiny fraction of consumers could every even hope of building any kind of multi-train layout at all. While the rest may love to look at them - they are just one of those "wow cool" kind of fantasies that have no chance of turning into sales. Things like that are super impressive to look at precisely because 99% of people at the show don't have, and will never have, anything remotely close to that at home. It's like seeing someone's 4 foot by 4 foot MOC. It draws a huge crowd. But would never translate to sales if it was boxed up and listed for sale.

  • tamamahmtamamahm Member Posts: 1,937
    dougts said:

    I guess I don't see how girls age out of friends any more than how boys age out of Star Wars or ninjago or any of the other one and done themes. The boy themes and sets don't seem any "older" than the girl ones. Girls, like boys, hit their teens and age out of Lego entirely. For both genders, the "next" thing to gravitate to is Creator and Creator Expert, both of which are highly gender-neutral. If one doesn't like any of those choices, then I'm not sure what you are realistically expecting?

    For better or worse LEGO is putting their girl efforts in the mini dolls. I think even if LEGO did come up with something for girls to move to after friends, it would still contain mini dolls, not minifigres

    I also think it's quite likely that LEGOs research has shown that girls will generally abandon toys at an earlier age than boys. My experience has shown this to be case, and it's widely accepted that girls mature earlier than boys as well. You also have to consider that with all the success of friends, girls probably still make up a significant minority of overall sales

    Saying friends is repetitive is like saying city is repetive. Of course it is when you look at it as if the same kid is getting all these sets year after year. Kids grow and move on and the next kid didn't get Olivia's house because they weren't into Lego back then so the current house is great for them. Also most kids get only a few sets, not entire themes

    I hated the idea of the girl minifigure sets on Cuusoo. Still hate it, for reasons I posted way back when

    I am sorry if I offended you. That wasn't my intent, nor do I want anyone to think your opinions should be dismissed. I always read what you have to write and I often find it relevant and well stated. My only point was to say that I sometimes think you have wildly unrealistic expectations. Or perhaps more like hopes


    Maybe I'm mistaken, but I very much see Friends as analogous to City.
    Maybe it is different in other demographics, but around here, City is often considered for 'younger' kids. Kids that are interested in Lego, but aren't necessarily old enough to have strong interest in themes.
    While younger kids may gravitate to themes, around here we generally see far fewer kids flocking to City.
    i.e. Kids of all ages request Star Wars or Ninjago, but we are only seeing the younger demographic within our schools requesting City.

    Harry Potter, Star Wars, Hobbit, LoTR, etc.. I see as focusing on trying to attract those older kids. In general, while not always true, themes can speak more to kids following movies or books. As an example, a Greek Mythology theme, I see as appealing to 2nd grade on up, although some younger kids may still be interested, but really hitting those kids that would be knee deep into Percy Jackson... so maybe more that 9+ group.


    I did just clarify this, but Friends being repetitive is okay to a point... Yes, like City, you need your core products, but you also have to have your subthemes or you lose your audience. This I do believe Lego realizes, or they would not have done Jungle. I just think they are missing the next piece, or they haven't gotten to the next piece yet.


    I have considered in the past the point you made about what is the age out of girls/boys, and it is one I'm still pondering. My own experience has been about the opposite of yours with boys phasing out of toys earlier than girls. On the flip, though, the question really isn't when the general toy phase out is, but when would the age phase-out for Lego, and I think that might be a very different answer. I really do not have enough data, though, to speculate well which way it would go.

    I think I do look at Lego very differently than most here, but I personally disagree that I have wildly unrealistic expectations.
    If I was Lego, with the huge focus on STEM in this country, and with the realization that about 50% of the population was being left on the table, I would be having a huge focus to grow that side of things. That is where they can make huge inroads in new markets. Finally, with Friends, I think they have something. To me the question is how big, how fast can they grow, but more importantly how big can that market be? Can it be as large as the current 'boy market'? They have to have the right speed of growth or it comes collapsing down. Grow to slow, and they lose momentum. Grow to fast, and things crash down. My fear, though, is they hit the former. It is why to me, you do the smart thing... You have Friends, new subtheme, put out princess, but then have one great line that appeals to both genders... then if it fails with girls, you at least have the boy side support it. While that is happening, you research the best other lines to come out with for girls.



  • dougtsdougts Oregon, USAMember Posts: 4,112
    tamamahm said:

    tamamahm said:

    That is great Pitfall, and there is nothing that says that girls do not like fire trucks, but yes, there are many that do not have interest there. (Even my son has no interest there. ;-) ) If there was a strong interest with girls and their fire trucks, we would not have a need of Lego Friends. As has been discussed many times on this board Lego Friends has gone after those that are not already interested in Lego and/or those that have not found the themes of interest in the Lego line because Lego does focus many of their lines on more traditional areas of boy interests. Great. They attracted a new demographic. The key now is maintaining, renewing and building that demographic, or you lose it.

    I have to be blunt and say I don't know what you mean by this? I think TLG did a fantastic job in creating a Friends theme. I don't see it as their responsibility to "maintain" as though it's some crop. I think it's unfair to assume everything has to go in another direction all together when this general business model has functioned just fine for decades.

    Id say overall I am incredibly "middle of the road" I do and enjoy just as many manly fixing up things around the house type stuff as I do sitting and reading a book and enjoying a cup of tea. I think of gender especially when it comes to stereotypes, very little if at all.

    Unfortunately I don't see where any of this is coming from and I think people need to have a larger perspective rather than one narrow thought process.

    I really do not see how stating basic business is being narrow.
    I am not sure I can be more plain with what I am saying.
    Lego saw a segment where they were not getting sales. They took step 1 in broadening and achieving a new demographic. Girls make up ~50% of the kids out there, and if they can even attain a portion of that they really grow their bottom line.

    A company, though, can not just call it done, or they lose that demographic after the initial luster is over. Yes, it IS the responsibility of a company to maintain. That is basic business 101. Why do you think we have updates to City? Why does Lego put out new police sets? Why does Lego create new licenses, and phases out old ones?
    It's because kids are fickle, and when the next new items comes, they hop on board.

    This is no different than any other toy company or line. Barbie, American Girl, Imaginext, Playmobil, Hotwheels, etc. They are constantly updating, revamping to maintain their market.
    Toy companies, though, have to maintain a balance between 'classic' and new. Thus, we see Lego consistently with police/city, and yet yearly new items in that line... Arctic, Coast Guard, Mining.

    If Lego wants to maintain or expand the growth they achieved via Lego Friends, they have to do the same that they have done in their other lines. Lego Friends was great, and probably one of the more creative of the lines they have going, but there was a focus on buildings/horses. In my area, I was beginning to see interest fade. As cool as a juice bar was... the interest was lower here, but interest in a Cruise ship was high, because it was new and different.
    The core of shops/horses, though, is important, in that in maintains your core and upcoming kids, but you have to revamp....just like the City line has to revamp.

    You either do that in a line, like City has done, by creating subthemes, and/or you do that by creating additional lines. Jungle is definitely a subtheme and should shake things up a bit. New, different, and they interconnect to make a larger set.

    The most successful toy lines, though, do both. They create subthemes, but completely new lines as well.

    I guess I would say in my view, Friends is doing exactly what you are asking for. You compare it to CITY, and I think that is an apt comparison. And I have seen with friends exactly the same type of scenarios that we see with CITY. Let's look at the 6 waves thus far:
    1. Shops/Car/Vignette to Intro each girl, plus the House
    2. Summer locales (camping, beachside, and Horse/stable camp)
    3. more character vignettes, shops, city pool
    4. high school, dolphin cruiser
    5. beach house, ranch, shop, variety of small sets - beach, farm, ice cream
    6. Jungle, camping, mall

    they seemed to have moved a lot (but not all) of the animal focus to the series packs, while keeping the various shops and dollhouses coming pretty regularly. In between, they have offered a pretty large variety of settings outside Heartlake City: Camping, Stables, Beaches, Pool, School, Cruise Ship, and now the Jungle.

    That is certainly at least as much variety, if not moreso, than we have seen over city in the same time frame, is it not?
  • dougtsdougts Oregon, USAMember Posts: 4,112
    edited May 2014
    tamamahm said:


    Maybe I'm mistaken, but I very much see Friends as analogous to City.
    Maybe it is different in other demographics, but around here, City is often considered for 'younger' kids. Kids that are interested in Lego, but aren't necessarily old enough to have strong interest in themes.

    I both agree and disagree with this. It's analogous in as far as the general setting (real life, city/towns along with wide range of content coverage) but it's quite different in as far as building techniques and detail. Friends is quite a bit more advanced than CITY in this regard. We see a lot more advanced techniques and a lot more attention to detail, as well as topics/themes that appeal to an older demographic of girl in general. Therefore, kids should "age out" of Friends at a later age than they do CITY, and perhaps at an age that is in line with aging out of Ninjago or Star Wars.
    tamamahm said:


    Finally, with Friends, I think they have something. To me the question is how big, how fast can they grow, but more importantly how big can that market be? Can it be as large as the current 'boy market'? They have to have the right speed of growth or it comes collapsing down. Grow to slow, and they lose momentum. Grow to fast, and things crash down.

    I guess I would say I think they are growing this at the right pace. I'm also honestly struggling to figure out what other new minidoll theme they could put out that would be popular enough to sell well, but wouldn't be overly redundant to what they are already doing with Friends. We know that anything IP focused would have to be based on a current movie or movie franchise. They haven't shown to do IP as themes other than that way (excluding SW of course, which is an entirely different animal)
  • BrickDancerBrickDancer Dunes of TatooineMember Posts: 3,639
    @tamamahm‌ And in this fair and egalitarian age, why aren't you encouraging your girls (and boy) to embrace themes that are not wholly pink and girly with accompanying girl figs? Shouldn't you be encouraging children to feel comfortable with all matters regardless of gender or gender-targeted themes?

    If before Friends & Princesses arrived on the scene, TLG was doing business with a demographic breakdown of 80% boys vs. 20% girls, then it would be logical that 80% of their offerings would appeal to the boy segment. And just because they are seeing a growth in the girl segment, that doesn't mean they should all of a sudden capitulate and throttle it to be 50%/50% offerings over a period of 1 or 2 years. Further to this point is that we do not have the data to show what the predicted mix would be if the market for girls was fully achieved. Perhaps that even when fully saturated and peaked, the mix would be 65% boy vs 35% girl, as building toys may not be as fun or attractive to the girls as to boys on the whole. Thus if TLG got overly excited for their new growth segment, that they can over produce and expand thus creating a loss and potential collapse of the segment or business even.

    You bring up Barbie, American Girl, etc., as a comparison point. But wouldn't you agree that more than 65% of their offerings are geared towards girls? What would you think of a guy complaining on the Barbie board about not having enough male dolls released?
    binaryeye
  • jcb193jcb193 Member Posts: 148
    It's a shame that almost every single great moment in history involves mainly an assassination or great military battle. Would love to see a "great moments in history" Lego series.

    Think of all the new demographics. Everyone from elementary school teachers to military model collectors.
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,339
    https://www.theglobalcmo.com/lego-global-marketing/

    This was a decent article to read. I do remember when TLG got a lot of slack for coming out with the Friends theme.

    Even though girls may roughly make up 50% of the market, it would be foolish to try and target all of them because there may only be 15% of those girls interested in Lego. It is no different than any product being marketed to the public. Based on statistical information, marketing companies put most of their money into targeting their biggest demographic.

  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,339
    jcb193 said:

    It's a shame that almost every single great moment in history involves mainly an assassination or great military battle. Would love to see a "great moments in history" Lego series.

    Think of all the new demographics. Everyone from elementary school teachers to military model collectors.

    I think TLG has made tremendous progress with incorporating Historical Figures. The Lego Movie had Abraham Lincoln and William Shakespeare.

    The CMF line has introduced many historical minifigures. Why does TLG need to come out with historical themes when you can pretty much make your own historical diorama? The only thing that is lacking are modern military themes. The closest that we have gotten to that was Indiana Jones.

  • prevereprevere North of Bellville, East of Heartlake, South of Bricksburg, West of Ninjago City Member Posts: 2,874
    The architecture series does have some historical value to it. Certainly, they could introduce something through DACTA/Educational line for teachers to purchase as well.
  • graphitegraphite USMember Posts: 3,239
    ^ I always hoped they would do something like #9348 and #9349 but with more historical figures. Could definitely do it themed for teachers. US history (ben franklin, washington, MLK, lincoln, columbus etc), World history (napolean, alexander, cleopatra, ramses etc), people of science (tesla, newton, copernicus, aristotle etc) although they've done a few of them I think done like those other two sets with a little scene or props related to each would be great. I'd also be happy if they threw some more in with the future CMFs but at a rate greater than one obvious notable figure per series.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,411
    edited May 2014
    tamamahm said:


    I really do not see how stating basic business is being narrow.
    I am not sure I can be more plain with what I am saying.
    Lego saw a segment where they were not getting sales. They took step 1 in broadening and achieving a new demographic. Girls make up ~50% of the kids out there, and if they can even attain a portion of that they really grow their bottom line.

    They did see a gap and they could fill it with something they thought would sell, and they were right. Little girls like Friends, and they sell well.
    tamamahm said:



    A company, though, can not just call it done, or they lose that demographic after the initial luster is over. Yes, it IS the responsibility of a company to maintain. That is basic business 101. Why do you think we have updates to City? Why does Lego put out new police sets? Why does Lego create new licenses, and phases out old ones?
    It's because kids are fickle, and when the next new items comes, they hop on board.

    City attracts a rage of ages, as they go from simple sets to more complex. Friends to me does the same.
    tamamahm said:


    This is no different than any other toy company or line. Barbie, American Girl, Imaginext, Playmobil, Hotwheels, etc. They are constantly updating, revamping to maintain their market.
    Toy companies, though, have to maintain a balance between 'classic' and new. Thus, we see Lego consistently with police/city, and yet yearly new items in that line... Arctic, Coast Guard, Mining.

    .....

    You either do that in a line, like City has done, by creating subthemes, and/or you do that by creating additional lines. Jungle is definitely a subtheme and should shake things up a bit. New, different, and they interconnect to make a larger set.

    The most successful toy lines, though, do both. They create subthemes, but completely new lines as well.

    Lego is doing subthemes for Friends, as you say, and these seem to be good additions. No doubt they will rehash older subthemes too, just like in City.

    The big question that is not answered is what should lego put out to attract girls that think they are too old for Friends (what age is this? 10-16?). There is a gap there (if you ignore the creator type sets) but can it really be filled? What do girls of this age group want? Looking at friends' kids of that age, they seem to want make-up, art-stuff / craft / beads, music, clothes, computer games. How should lego appeal to those girls? Brick-built make-up sets?

    Does Mattel (Barbie) and Playmobil make toys that sell well to that age demographic?

    I'm hoping my daughter continues to play with lego when she is that age and sticks with some of the "boys toys" - the more engineering type sets.
    dougtsLostInTranslation
  • binaryeyebinaryeye USMember Posts: 1,734
    edited May 2014
    tamamahm said:

    Lego specifically put out Friends to resolve an issue. The Issue is that the were missing the girl demographic.

    That's an assumption. Based on what LEGO has done with Friends, I don't think the issue was missing out on the "girl" demographic. It seems more likely that LEGO realized there was an age range of girls that offered an opportunity for increased profit, and created a theme to cater to that age range.
    tamamahm said:

    They put out Friends. That is great. The reality, though, is that those girls will eventually either age out of Friends, and Without a next theme to move into, Lego will lose the group they fought hard to gain.

    Again, you're making an assumption here that LEGO wants to cater to teenage girls. Perhaps their market research has indicated that this demographic would not be profitable for them.
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,339
    Santa's Workshop is right up your alley @tamamahm‌ :)
    dougts
  • flyingpigflyingpig Member Posts: 119
    Lego has a sales winner in friends and followed up with Disney princesses, which is also making a killing. Let's wait and see what the come out with next year before sounding the alarm.
    FollowsCloselydougts
  • littlepuppilittlepuppi Member Posts: 181
    What are peoples thoughts on kingdoms joust? Worth tucking a couple away?
  • tamamahmtamamahm Member Posts: 1,937
    binaryeye said:

    tamamahm said:

    Lego specifically put out Friends to resolve an issue. The Issue is that the were missing the girl demographic.

    That's an assumption. Based on what LEGO has done with Friends, I don't think the issue was missing out on the "girl" demographic. It seems more likely that LEGO realized there was an age range of girls that offered an opportunity for increased profit, and created a theme to cater to that age range.
    tamamahm said:

    They put out Friends. That is great. The reality, though, is that those girls will eventually either age out of Friends, and Without a next theme to move into, Lego will lose the group they fought hard to gain.

    Again, you're making an assumption here that LEGO wants to cater to teenage girls. Perhaps their market research has indicated that this demographic would not be profitable for them.
    Binaryeye, the first comment we are in complete agreement actually. I wasn't thinking they were just plugging a hole out of the kindness of their little Lego hearts. LOL! This is only about profit. I personally think someone in Lego realized that there is an upper limit on how much a family will spend on an individual for Lego, so they first diversified into 'toys' and tv show, which means accessories, and online games... They will saturate that as well, so the next obvious place to grow profit is to tackle the 'female' segment. This is all about growing their business and maximizing profit, and with STEM being such a huge thing right now, they are able to capitalize on that as well with parents.


    On the second, I think you were assuming I was talking teen. I'm really referring more to the preteen age, but yes, as CCC pointed out, and something I personally have considered as well is what is the breakpoint for girls. Do they simply have no interest after a certain age, does it hit earlier than boys, do they not have the right sets out? I do think there are questions that need to be asked and answered.
    CCC said:


    I'm hoping my daughter continues to play with lego when she is that age and sticks with some of the "boys toys" - the more engineering type sets.

    If she is interested now in science/engineeering items, that often will continue, even if not always via Lego. My general experience, though, is that often science/engineering toys and items are geared towards boys in subtle and not-so subtle ways, which can impact interest. I will say the engineering program that our elementary school uses does try to remove some typical gender stereotypes I have encountered in the past. It is very fascinating seeing the kids, take very different approaches, and what topics they choose based on interest, and generally I do see a large gender difference in what interest areas they have chosen.
    Pitfall69 said:

    Santa's Workshop is right up your alley @tamamahm‌ :)

    Yes, the Winter sets we use as family builds.
    I actually think my 7 year old will love the reindeer, while I am not a fan of how they are built. I'm a bit neutral at the moment, and am waiting to see the inside and price tag before formulating a final opinion. I already created a grotto, I picked up extra elves, have my Mr. and Ms. Claus, and I am not sure this really works as a Santa Workshop for me, so I am waiting for more info before formulating an opinion.
    I'm also not so patiently waiting for any word on the Minecraft sets.
  • Farmer_JohnFarmer_John USA - 4,035 Miles from 62 West Wallaby St., Wigan, Lancashire, UKMember Posts: 2,401
    edited May 2014
    Shib said:

    I can see hunger games working in terms of what they could do, but not sure how it fits with TLGs often inconsistent 'family friendly' guidelines.

    Oh come on...kids being forced to kill kids wouldn't work as a Lego theme? [sarcasm]

    I can image some kid playing with their newly purchased TLG Hunger Games play set and deciding to try it for real. At least that seems to be the world we now live in...
  • tamamahmtamamahm Member Posts: 1,937
    Yes, they can't do Hunger Games, but the reality is that Hunger Games was a HUGE trend, and kids at school were playing games related to Hunger Games. When themes hit school yards, they are 'big'. Dystopian as a genre is huge right now.

    I do not see any violence happening anymore than violence we have happen with any of the other Lego Themes they have with weapons. Yes, it is kid against kid, but kids very much see this as 'fantasy play' like many of the other Lego genres and not real world play.

    As said, though... not happening.

  • prevereprevere North of Bellville, East of Heartlake, South of Bricksburg, West of Ninjago City Member Posts: 2,874
    They should do Starving Games minifigs instead.

    In this Hunger Games spoof, Kantmiss Evershot must fight for her life in the 75th annual Starving Games, where she could also win an old ham, a coupon for a foot-long sub, and a partially eaten pickle.
    lordzarakslovakiasteph
  • pharmjodpharmjod 1,170 miles to Wall Drug, USAMember Posts: 2,868
    Or the ever oddly present sausage or carrot.
    Pitfall69wagnerml2Rainstorm26jasor
  • doriansdaddoriansdad CTCMember Posts: 1,337
    Just a heads up beginning 5/15 Paypal will no longer require signature confirmation on transactions less than $750 to be eligible for seller protection, just delivery confirmation (previously $250+ required signature confirmation).
  • y2joshy2josh Member Posts: 2,002
    ^That seems like a very bad idea...
  • littlepuppilittlepuppi Member Posts: 181
    Any thoughts on kingdoms joust? Ive bought 3.. One for me and 2 for future sale, was this sensible? Paid 70 UKP each inc delivery...
    Milne44
  • doriansdaddoriansdad CTCMember Posts: 1,337
    Starting today no more INR's for your international sales <$750. Half-priced boxes at staples until 5/17. Good times :)
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,411
    What do you need for that? Just proof of posting, or still proof of delivery just without a signature?

    There is an interesting new line in the UK agreement ...

    Open a Dispute within 45 days (or, if you are claiming as a registered UK resident user of PayPal, 180 days)

    so it looks like it will be possible to make a claim for non-delivery up to 6 months later, instead of 1.5 months.
  • doriansdaddoriansdad CTCMember Posts: 1,337
    edited May 2014
    Just delivery confirmation. Yep UK is already added to my do not ship to list unless they want to wire the money or send an envelope stuffed with cash. 90 days for ebay this holiday season is barely tolerable, 180 days is insanity.

    Here is the update for those folks interested:

    https://www.paypal.com/webapps/mpp/ua/upcoming-policies-full
    FollowsClosely
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,411
    It's strange isn't it. We live in a global market, but soon we'll only sell to and buy from our next-door neighbours. :-)
  • doriansdaddoriansdad CTCMember Posts: 1,337
    Well other payment services are gaining ground fast and ebay is becoming less relevant as time and ridiculous policies pass. Social selling is the future.....won;t be an issue then.
    cloaked7
  • Milne44Milne44 Member Posts: 112
    I was thinking of buying a few to stash any too , I thanks the joust will do well EOL
  • BrickDancerBrickDancer Dunes of TatooineMember Posts: 3,639
    If you look at Joust's stablemates, King's Castle, MMV, MVR, etc; none have performed that well so far being 1-2 years past EOL even. That theme doesn't appreciate much or as fast in comparison to others.
  • cloaked7cloaked7 Member Posts: 1,448
    edited May 2014

    Well other payment services are gaining ground fast and ebay is becoming less relevant as time and ridiculous policies pass. Social selling is the future.....won;t be an issue then.

    The path that eBay has taken is unfortunate. In some ways I guess that's what Wall Street does to a company. (focus on profits) They are so different from the eBay I knew and sold on 15+ years ago it seems like a totally different company. Not all that has changed is bad. Shipping is a lot easier. Using the website, tracking auctions, adding photos, creating an auction... all easier. But, unfortunately their new rules, mandated policies, and higher fees outweigh all the good stuff.

    And, there are a lot (I mean a lot) of people that have never used eBay, and have no desire too. People that use, and love, Amazon. Try as they may eBay will never be on the same level as Amazon. But, that sure appears what they want to be.

  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    cloaked7 said:

    Well other payment services are gaining ground fast and ebay is becoming less relevant as time and ridiculous policies pass. Social selling is the future.....won;t be an issue then.

    The path that eBay has taken is unfortunate. In some ways I guess that's what Wall Street does to a company. (focus on profits) They are so different from the eBay I knew and sold on 15+ years ago it seems like a totally different company. Not all that has changed is bad. Shipping is a lot easier. Using the website, tracking auctions, adding photos, creating an auction... all easier. But, unfortunately their new rules, mandated policies, and higher fees outweigh all the good stuff.

    Sounds like another company I know. I can't think of it right now though, it's on the tip of my tongue...thinking, thinking...
    cloaked7BrickDancerPitfall69FollowsCloselydougtsjasor
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,339
    edited May 2014
    cloaked7 said:


    And, there are a lot (I mean a lot) of people that have never used eBay, and have no desire too. People that use, and love, Amazon. Try as they may eBay will never be on the same level as Amazon. But, that sure appears what they want to be.

    First, you need to be remotely close to Amazon before you start acting like you are Amazon.

  • doriansdaddoriansdad CTCMember Posts: 1,337
    Well I believe the future of peer to peer selling is neither ebay or amazon. Picture a global site, heavily trafficked, filled with all sorts of storefronts and employing a useful search engine (google I am looking at you). Shop owners and buyers interact via chat and payment is made via bitcoin or whatever crypto currency becomes mainstream. No house take, no paypal or other payment processor and their ridiculous mandates, just a true global marketplace with no interference. Astonishingly close to present day Alibaba but I believe it will become global and the future of e-commerce. Ebay will go the way of AOL and Kodak. Amazon will always have a place.
  • cloaked7cloaked7 Member Posts: 1,448
    ^ We can only wish. Of course, knowing Google (well, I don't personally know Google, and am not at genius level - as most of their employees) they are already looking into something like that.

    Chrome is a classic example of what Google can do. It is now, and has been for years, so superior to I.E. it isn't even funny. Remember when I.E. was ubiquitous? And, had what looked like a insurmountable lead in browser technology. Along came Chrome and quickly ate I.E.'s lunch. Now I.E. will never catch up. (Canvas is doing the same thing to Flash. Guess which browser fully supports Canvas. And, guess which one doesn't?)
  • graphitegraphite USMember Posts: 3,239
    ^ In my opinion at least, Firefox blew IE out of the water like 5 or 6 years before Chrome came. But Chrome definitely is rocking the browser war right now.
  • dougtsdougts Oregon, USAMember Posts: 4,112
    sure, but firefox never had the platform to enable themselves to gain market share. Chrome did, via Google's vast userbase.
  • jcb193jcb193 Member Posts: 148
    How do you guys feel about long term investing in the branded LEGO CUUSOO sets. Like Back to the Future? When these get cheap $25-$30, it seems worth loading up on. It's a nice set. Great packaging. Not a huge box. Doesn't seem hard to imagine it going to $50-$100. What are the risks? That they could come out with new BTTF sets or that a once and done is hard to build demand for?
  • graphitegraphite USMember Posts: 3,239
    dougts said:

    sure, but firefox never had the platform to enable themselves to gain market share. Chrome did, via Google's vast userbase.

    Firefox peaked a little after Chrome came out at about 48% according to W3Schools logs and Chrome is currently at 58% 6 years after coming out. For Google's "vast" userbase I'd say Firefox did extremely well and isn't really a significant amount different in terms of market share.

  • littlepuppilittlepuppi Member Posts: 181
    Cheers for the opinoins on joust guys...
  • cloaked7cloaked7 Member Posts: 1,448
    jcb193 said:

    How do you guys feel about long term investing in the branded LEGO CUUSOO sets. Like Back to the Future? When these get cheap $25-$30, it seems worth loading up on. It's a nice set. Great packaging. Not a huge box. Doesn't seem hard to imagine it going to $50-$100. What are the risks? That they could come out with new BTTF sets or that a once and done is hard to build demand for?

    Just my humble opinion, but I think all of the CUUSOO sets will do well long term.

  • littlepuppilittlepuppi Member Posts: 181
    will the back to the future be around much longer?
  • BrickDancerBrickDancer Dunes of TatooineMember Posts: 3,639
    ^After what happened with the Rover and their supposed rationale as to why, I wouldn't take any chances on the BttF set if you want it for yourself.
  • cloaked7cloaked7 Member Posts: 1,448
    edited May 2014
    ^ @BrickDancer What happened and what was the reason given? Is the rover officially not coming back? (I read some things, but never got the whole story.)
  • BrickDancerBrickDancer Dunes of TatooineMember Posts: 3,639
    I spoke with a CS who relayed the memo received says they want to go back to what Cuusoo was originally meant to be which was a limited release offering. Thus the incredibly short production run for the Rover: released Jan. 10 and sold out in the US by Mar. 27.

    There was also the mention by perijove from the very beginning that TLG possibly meant for a 10,000 run only to begin with.

    This case on the Rover is a real puzzler for what may or may not happen for the Delorean. Released before the it in Aug. 2013.
  • lordzaraklordzarak OH, United StatesMember Posts: 329
    edited May 2014
    Another thing to consider regarding Cuusoo is the popularity of the licensed sets. The Minecraft and BTTF sets have consistently been in Amazon's top 20 selling Lego sets. Eventually, these sets will retire, but the demand will likely remain. Especially with a Minecraft movie on the way. I think Ghostbusters will repeat the Minecraft/BTTF availability, but the Exo Suit may be as rare as the Mars Rover.
  • ericbericb Member Posts: 71

    There was also the mention by perijove from the very beginning that TLG possibly meant for a 10,000 run only to begin with.

    In this case, LEGO should have offered backers the chance to buy the Rover first.

    It makes no sense to set a low production run on a set which owes its existence to fan popularity.

    cloaked7jasor
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,096
    If you want the Rover, the Discovery centers may still have stock. My parents went to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida and found it in stock, although marked up to $50. It's a fun model and a shame if it's truly discontinued after such a short run.
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,096
    I agree that the Exo Suit will be something to buy immediately. I can see Ghostbusters sticking around for awhile.
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