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Is Hero Factory of interest here?

prestonstormerprestonstormer Guest Posts: 17
edited April 2014 in Collecting
I was wondering if anyone actually collects Hero Factory here?

Comments

  • vwong19vwong19 San DiegoMember Posts: 1,185
    My 5 year old really likes Hero Factory. He watches the animations and shorts.

    To be honest, I liked them when they came out several years ago to replace Bionicles so I bought a few. The last wave was pretty weird so I stayed away from them, but this current wave with the smaller scale figures in mech armor is pretty cool. I don't really get the shark looking monsters.

    So I admit to collecting them.... I mean my 5 yo collects them.
    andhe
  • prestonstormerprestonstormer Guest Posts: 17
    I like the fact that they are a mix between Lego and action figures. What could be better?
    Aanchir
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,410
    A slow and painful death.
    rancorbaitFurrysaurus
  • prestonstormerprestonstormer Guest Posts: 17
    Pitfall69 said:

    A slow and painful death.

    I didn't say it was for everyone
    Pitfall69scrumperAanchir
  • rancorbaitrancorbait Manitoba CanadaMember Posts: 1,850
    Like you say, its not for everyone. But one of the main reasons I like LEGO system is because of the diversity. You can build anything. with Hero Factory/Bionicle you are restricted to action figures.

    There is also less building value, which is most of the fun for me :o)
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,003


    There is also less building value ...

    That depends on your imagination and skill level ...

    image

    image

    My kids have some of the chima ones, and love them.
    andheTheOneVeyroniancarlqJenniYellowcastlelegomattricecake
  • RocketbillyRocketbilly Member Posts: 23
    Hero Factory is one of my main interests when it comes to LEGO, and action figures have always been a big part of my LEGO hobby...in fact I have most Hero Factory sets that have been released so far, with the excetion of the current wave and a few from series one and three.
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,098
    My son loves Hero Factory. I agree that they are geared for young boys. My issue with them is the lack of part diversity. We have two buckets full of torso, arm and leg joints. My son likes to build a couple and then take them apart. I try to get him to leave them together so he can build an army.
  • rancorbaitrancorbait Manitoba CanadaMember Posts: 1,850
    edited April 2014
    @CCC I was referring to the official models ;o)

    They have quite a few system parts on the tiger, but I will admit, it looks amazing!
  • vwong19vwong19 San DiegoMember Posts: 1,185

    I like the fact that they are a mix between Lego and action figures. What could be better?

    I got the Super Heroes "Hero Factory" figures because I also collect action figures.

    During my dark ages (after ~1987) I bought a Bionicle figure in 2001, because those popped out to me in the toy isle. I built it and thought it was fun, but never bought another Lego product until 2007.

    Lego Star Wars got me hooked, but Hero Factory is a nice change of pace from the standard Lego brick. The great thing about Lego is the various types of models (i.e. Duplo, Technic, Mindstorm) that can all work together.

  • akunthitaakunthita USAMember Posts: 1,035
    I was never really interested in Hero Factory, but I love the new mini heroes and that their accessories are compatible with regular LEGO minifigs. If you want to see how they fit I wrote an article about them: http://thebrickblogger.com/2014/04/lego-hero-factory-minifigs-are-awesome/ And yes, they are awesome! :D
  • TheOneVeyronianTheOneVeyronian Help me, I'm inside the M25! (UK)Member Posts: 1,360
    I'm one of those AFOL's (and an AFFOL at that) that collects Hero Factory as well as System, and I love building with both (sometimes together in the same model where I require articulation in a System model, such as a mech for example). I think I collect Hero Factory since Bionicle was a big part of my child and teenage years, and, well, I never grew out of LEGO.

    I do also have a use for Hero Factory outside of LEGO as well, and use the pieces as well as other mediums to create custom action figures (like the one in my avatar). In fact I was doing that before I was even into serious LEGO collecting.
  • tamamahmtamamahm Member Posts: 1,964
    My son has had the occasional Bionicle, which to me is the same as Hero Factory. In general, though, it is not something he has ever asked for. I only picked up the ones I did because they were on clearance.
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,877
    I collect Hero Factory and have done so since 2011 (when the new "character and creature building system" was introduced). It's an amazing building system with fantastic creative potential. As some people have said, it's optimized for building action figures, so for subjects like architecture or scenery it's not ideal. But when it comes to freeform action figure building, without the kind of elaborate planning that has to go into System-based mecha, there's no better substitute. I find the building process very therapeutic, and I definitely got a lot of use out of my Hero Factory sets during my final, incredibly frustrating semester at college.

    You can see some of my Hero Factory creations on my Flickr. Caitlyn Gauss XL is my largest and most elaborate creation, standing about twelve inches tall, but I also love building smaller creations like this dog. I also appreciate the simple elegance of Hero Factory set designs (they're definitely more than parts packs), but that doesn't stop me from disassembling them to create my own original models.

    Hero Factory, BIONICLE, Galidor, and the like belong to a category that the LEGO Group calls "constraction" (for "constructible action figure"). The constraction category is not very well-loved by a lot of AFOLs. Some are willing to dismiss it as garbage even today. But the number of amazing BIONICLE and Hero Factory creations viewable online and at conventions are proof of its creative potential. I'm happy to have gotten to enjoy constraction from its infancy in the late 90s to its current state. It will probably always be somewhat niche, but it keeps improving on its ability to fill that niche in a way that no competing building toy has managed.
    dmg111
  • legomattlegomatt Member Posts: 2,548
    edited April 2014
    I agree, i've seen some amazing mocs using those pieces.

    If someone can design a close-to-movie Balrog with these constraction pieces, i'll love its weirdness forever.

    Until then, I just can't bring myself to buy any of it to experiment with (I feel i'd need an awful lot sets at great expense to really get to grips with the construction methods, and still have no guarantee that it'd pay dividends with anything remotely close or usable).

    I'm not particularly good at moccing regular elements, so I'm afraid the totally alien (to me) connection style puts me off going near it - I just don't know if i'd be able to use the parts in anything. But if money was no object, i'd happily buy a load of it, just to experiment with.
  • beegeedeebeegeedee Galway, IrelandMember Posts: 380
    My wife won a competition and got 7 of the 2013 ones as a prize. Made a couple for the kids and gave the rest away as presents. I was really impressed by them and can see how you could use some of the parts for other things. However, saying that, I think they are very expensive for what they are.

    Kids loved them too.
  • crazycarlcrazycarl USAMember Posts: 392
    I like the new mech style ones. aside from those I would never have bought any.
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,877
    legomatt said:

    I agree, i've seen some amazing mocs using those pieces.

    If someone can design a close-to-movie Balrog with these constraction pieces, i'll love its weirdness forever.

    Until then, I just can't bring myself to buy any of it to experiment with (I feel i'd need an awful lot sets at great expense to really get to grips with the construction methods, and still have no guarantee that it'd pay dividends with anything remotely close or usable).

    I'm not particularly good at moccing regular elements, so I'm afraid the totally alien (to me) connection style puts me off going near it - I just don't know if i'd be able to use the parts in anything. But if money was no object, i'd happily buy a load of it, just to experiment with.

    Depending on where you live, sometimes you can find constraction sets and parts for a lowish price at LEGO conventions. My brother and I got #70204 CHI Worriz and #70205 CHI Razar for about $7 apiece at Brickfair Virginia last year from The Brick Show's vendor table (these were copies they had reviewed, so the packages were open but all the contents were included). That's a little over half off and close to what would be a typical price-per-piece by System standards. Other vendors sell bulk parts that they've sorted out, or loose parts by weight or volume, but I think starting with a medium-size set is probably better if you haven't experienced the building system before, since playing around with a single set's pieces can give you a good sense of what connections and techniques are possible.

    I think this year's Hero Factory sets have gotten more attention from AFOLs than many previous ones since they are minifigure-based battle machines and monsters instead of 7-inch/18-centimeter robot action figures. The mini-hero armor, helmets, and cockpits are fully compatible with classic minifigures, and they use generic minifigure weapons. #44018 Furno Jet Machine is my favorite of the sets currently available, with a great parts selection and a great design. #44019 Rocka Stealth Machine doesn't look too bad either. If you find either of those at a considerable bargain ($8–10) they might be worth picking up as a "first taste" of Hero Factory building, and then you'll have a better sense of whether other sets are worth paying closer to full price for. Even if you don't decide the theme is worth collecting, there are plenty of parts like 17114, 57909, and 92013 that can act as easy constraction-to-System adapters so you can take advantage of the parts in System MOCs, so your initial purchase doesn't go to waste.

    You can also experiment with Hero Factory parts for the low, low price of free using LEGO Digital Designer software, which has almost every Hero Factory piece from the last three years available to build with. But I don't know if it'd be as good a learning experience (or as fun and therapeutic) as building with those parts in real life. Ball joints on LDD can be frustrating!
  • klatu003klatu003 Hobbiton, Shire, Middle EarthMember Posts: 723
    While shopping on Lego.com #44001 Pyrox was listed in the sale items. It caught my attention as a good base for a LoTR Balrog. Does anyone have this model? Do the trans orange parts glow enough to sell a fire-being?
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,877
    klatu003 said:

    While shopping on Lego.com #44001 Pyrox was listed in the sale items. It caught my attention as a good base for a LoTR Balrog. Does anyone have this model? Do the trans orange parts glow enough to sell a fire-being?

    I'm going to be honest with you. Pyrox is a pretty lackluster model. It has a really poor piece count for its price point (even by Hero Factory standards), and many parts of the model feel incomplete. Even at the sale price I don't know if I'd call it a good value.

    It definitely has some parts that could be useful for making a Balrog (the black "paw", the Tr. Fluore. Reddish-Orange claws, the black Ben 10 feet, and the Titanium Metallic chest plate), and the transparent shell and claws would definitely be glowy enough for your purposes, but I think you could get many of those same parts for a much better value if you bought this year's #44021 Splitter Beast, even at full price. That one has two paws with four claws on each, four transparent shells instead of just one, feet that are much more versatile as building elements, and more black shells in larger sizes (which I think would be more appropriate for building a Balrog than Dark Red ones). Also it has two of the incredibly useful friction joint, a godsend for building larger models.

    The only major disadvantage to Splitter Beast compared to Pyrox (other than price, obviously), is that the various Medium Azur bones and the printed black shells would not be useful for making a Balrog, but that's not a huge concern. Black and Dark Stone Grey bones are easy to come by, and Pyrox doesn't exactly have much better variety in bones anyhow. One other thing Pyrox has that Splitter Beast doesn't have are those giant black horns, but you can get four of those from #44020 Flyer Beast, also a good value though not as well-colored to serve as a Balrog parts pack. You can compare the pieces yourself if you like, though:

    44001 inventory
    44021 inventory

    Hope this info is helpful!
    klatu003
  • klatu003klatu003 Hobbiton, Shire, Middle EarthMember Posts: 723
    @Aanchir - Thanks for the detailed response!
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