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LEGO Pricing Becoming Prohibitive to Collecting?

124

Comments

  • dougtsdougts Oregon, USAMember Posts: 4,129
    ^ there is certainly something to be said for the approach-ability and larger group supportability of those old arcade games. I always loved Track and Field on the cocktail/tabletop format. While today's console games certainly are fantastic, they generally require a decent amount of time to learn, and each game or session is also long. One of the things I remember about arcade and console gaming in my childhood is that even with 8 or 10 kids, everyone got to rotate in and out pretty freqeuently, because the games just didn't last too long. And kids who hadn't played before could get up to speed reasonable quickly.
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,098
    Xefan said:

    This is mostly nostalgic nonsense. The things being done with modern storylines are extremely impressive, the story from start to end including most of the side stories in games like the Mass Effect stories rival anything that's ever really come out of the games industry and Hollywood alike.

    I'm also not convinced about your point on grinding being a modern phenomenon, I remember spending hours getting enough money in my city on Sim City to build the things I wanted to and things like mining and woodcutting in the aformentioned UO in 1997 were pretty repetitive. I think you're looking at the past with rather rose tinted glasses.

    When I said "grinding" I was specifically talking about older games. As a early-teen I enjoyed the Ultima and Phantasy Star games. I tried re-playing Phantasy Star 2 on my iPhone and I just could not get into it. Those old games required you to spend hours leveling up. I remember Zelda 2 being the same. Unfortunately I don't have the time or money to spend on new games. My oldest son loves Skylanders which I can also get into because it is so easy. The new Thief game has piqued my interest but since it's rated M I won't be playing that due to my small children.
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,444

    This thread has rekindled my urge to collect those dedicated tabletop video games from the 80's. Like Donkey Kong, Ms. Pac Man, etc. You've probably seen them, they look like little arcade games.

    They are actually pretty collectible. I think in an Episode of Toy Hunter he found one and bought it.

  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,444
    CCC said:

    Pitfall69 said:

    The thread reminds me about the conversations about food I have with my clients. Some organic food is definitely worth the higher costs because of the lack of harmful chemical residues. An organic tomato has more anti oxidants than a non organic. The catch is, you have to know what to buy organic and what not to. Conventionally grown foods like kiwis, avocados and onions are perfectly fine for you and you don't need to "waste" your money buying organic.

    It depends why you buy organic. Chemical free residues in the food you are eating is not the only reason. Some people choose organic not just for the health benefits, but because they believe that intensive (crop) farming using weedkillers and other chemicals harms birds, insects, fish and other wildlife.
    I know a lot of people like this, most of them smoke cigarettes. I like to point this out to them when they post crap on Facebook :)

  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    edited February 2014
    wagnerml2 said:

    @pharmjod had it right. If you are a retrogamer, the book "Ready Player ONe" is a great read. @thelonetensor - I recently collected them all. They are made by Coleco and you can pick them up for about $50 if you look hard. In addition to my Lego addiction, I also refurbish old 80's arcade games. I currently have a perfect Donkey Kong cabinet with an Icade 60 in 1 board and I have a Defender Cabinet with a 19 in one board, but my prize is a 1980 PacMan cocktail table that I just completely redid with all original parts including a silk screened glass top (Impossible to find). I dropped a 60 in 1 board in it and my kids are hooked! My son hasn't turned his X-Box on in 3 weeks, he's had all his friends over to play. My son can't quite beat me at Galaga, but he's getting close!!!

    Yup those are the ones, and others too, like the Galaxy II and Galaxian handhelds; those were the bee's knees. Now you just need to get yourself a Addams Family pinball game to round out your gameroom, but that's a whole other level of maintenance.

    It's funny you mention Galaga too, because I just picked up the Galaga & Pac Man Hallmark ornaments, which just have sounds and some light, but are cool nostalgia anyway (there are youtube videos). Nothing quite the caliber of your Pac Man table, but it'll do for now. Also, it's nice reminding the kids that there were some awesome games back in the 80's, and they are worth preserving. Along with that book @pharmjod mentioned, the movie The King of Kong is entertaining as hell.
  • graphitegraphite USMember Posts: 3,270
    ^ "That man is playing Galaga. Thought we wouldn't notice. But we did"
    TheLoneTensorPitfall69LostInTranslation
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 10,167

    This thread has rekindled my urge to collect those dedicated tabletop video games from the 80's. Like Donkey Kong, Ms. Pac Man, etc. You've probably seen them, they look like little arcade games.

    Yeah an old Pizza place by where I used to work had a Super Mario Bros tabletop game. Kinda wish I would have asked them how much for it


    As for pricing, I think if you distill all the arguments here it boils down to demand though.
    If it is too pricey then you have a few options:
    Do not buy
    Buy only on sale
    Complain to LEGO CS
    buy another companies blocks.

    It is a crappy answer, but really that is what it boils down to.

    I hate to think LEGO will price itself out of the Market, but if it does then hopefully they realize the error of their ways before it is too late.
    I really do see parallels here to the late 90s for LEGO. Sure they are making money, but they are getting a bit 'too big for their britches' .. Factories everywhere, poor quality and QnA on top of that, too many piece types and tire types, branching out to all sort of ventures instead of their signature toy, blocking discounts on exclusives (not sure if that is only in US or globally)... they are starting to act like a business corporation instead of a private company IMO. Many of these things they scaled back from in the early 2000's if I am not mistaken. Pretty sure they tried to reduce the different sizes of tires and also colors from the palette in the early 2000's, and they wanted to consolidate everything to Billund as well in terms of production.

    They are making a lot of money now so I think they are blinded. However, if they are not careful, things may start to look like the late 90's for LEGO and they may notice too late. Like, heaven forbid, MB getting SW or Marvel or DC licenses when those contracts with LEGO are near expiration again, and Disney owns both SW and Marvel now, that would be a HUGE double whammy if that happened.


  • ACWWGal2011ACWWGal2011 Member Posts: 534
    buy another companies blocks.
    currently looking into that. Got my eyes on 2 mega bloks sets plus the company that got the pokemon theme and I have plans of checking the clone brands at TRU and target in the near future.

    watch out lego, you've got serious completion on the way.
    too many piece types and tire types
    agreed. It seems like they are constantly release parts that have little use or "what could that even be used for" or "Oh great, another uni-tasker part" and not enough "YES! I've been needing that part".

    I mean really, come on lego. Mega bloks has double side stud plates and 1x2 cheese with studs on the slope! now that's a part that's actually valuable for moc'ing.
    Like, heaven forbid, MB getting SW or Marvel or DC licenses when those contracts with LEGO are near expiration again, and Disney owns both SW and Marvel now, that would be a HUGE double whammy if that happened.
    it could be bye bye lego since those types of themes are the big money makers for them
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,444
    Lego will outbid anyone for those licenses. The problem with that is it will add to the cost of Lego sets.
  • binaryeyebinaryeye USMember Posts: 1,734

    agreed. It seems like they are constantly release parts that have little use or "what could that even be used for" or "Oh great, another uni-tasker part" and not enough "YES! I've been needing that part".

    These look pretty versatile to me:
    15706
    15071
    15070
    15208
    15395

    And that doesn't include the new small ball joint system, which is incredibly useful.
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 10,167
    Pitfall69 said:

    Lego will outbid anyone for those licenses. The problem with that is it will add to the cost of Lego sets.

    Are you so sure about that? A lot of things can happen.. a few missteps by LEGO and they are on hard times, and cannot afford to outbid an overzealous competitor, or LEGO getting a big head and saying it is not worth it(unlikely I know), Disney getting REALLY greedy, OR another company like MB, or Hasbro, come in determined to get the licenses at whatever cost, and those are not small companies that own those lines either..
    Sometimes it does not just boil down to money.. Maybe Disney wants to give to to Hasbro, who I believe owns Kenner, so they could sell mini figures without a hassle.. You just do not know.
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,098

    Factories everywhere, poor quality and QnA on top of that, too many piece types and tire types, branching out to all sort of ventures instead of their signature toy, blocking discounts on exclusives (not sure if that is only in US or globally)... they are starting to act like a business corporation instead of a private company IMO.

    I don't have a problem paying a bit more for quality. But with the cracked bricks, abundance of stickers and like you said, factories everywhere the quality is diminished. The pre-90's sets were all made in either Denmark or Switzerland.
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,923
    edited February 2014
    binaryeye said:

    agreed. It seems like they are constantly release parts that have little use or "what could that even be used for" or "Oh great, another uni-tasker part" and not enough "YES! I've been needing that part".

    These look pretty versatile to me:
    15706
    15071
    15070
    15208
    15395

    And that doesn't include the new small ball joint system, which is incredibly useful.
    Yeah, and there have been even more immensely useful parts recently if you expand your search to include the past few years:

    99780
    99781
    99207
    99206
    98138
    11090
    13548

    ...etcetera, ad infinitum.

    Beyond that, the LEGO Group still keeps the number of parts in production in any given year closely in check. I remember reading a comment by somebody working for the LEGO Group at one point that summed it up nicely — people pay very close attention to which new parts show up each year, but pay far less attention to how many stop being used at the same time.

    The number of colors has also been kept closely in check. There are currently 40 solid colors, 14 transparent colors, and seven or eight metallic colors being used in sets. Fewer than 64 colors total. Back before the LEGO Group reduced their color palette, there were over 100 colors on the palette, some of which were only used for one or two sets.
  • PaperbackwriterPaperbackwriter Member Posts: 105
    Limited editions should be priced significantly higher. Like 41999. It was easily foreseeable that it would be a quick sellout. Lego left money on the table.
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 10,167
    edited February 2014
    mathew said:

    Factories everywhere, poor quality and QnA on top of that, too many piece types and tire types, branching out to all sort of ventures instead of their signature toy, blocking discounts on exclusives (not sure if that is only in US or globally)... they are starting to act like a business corporation instead of a private company IMO.

    I don't have a problem paying a bit more for quality. But with the cracked bricks, abundance of stickers and like you said, factories everywhere the quality is diminished. The pre-90's sets were all made in either Denmark or Switzerland.
    Yeah, I did not have an issue with stickers, but then again I have a romantic notion of the stickers from the 80 that did not come off unless you wanted them too. Now it is peel them off the paper wrong and they dog ear something bad. Just sad now
    Aanchir said:



    Beyond that, the LEGO Group still keeps the number of parts in production in any given year closely in check. I remember reading a comment by somebody working for the LEGO Group at one point that summed it up nicely — people pay very close attention to which new parts show up each year, but pay far less attention to how many stop being used at the same time.

    The number of colors has also been kept closely in check. There are currently 40 solid colors, 14 transparent colors, and seven or eight metallic colors being used in sets. Fewer than 64 colors total. Back before the LEGO Group reduced their color palette, there were over 100 colors on the palette, some of which were only used for one or two sets.

    I do not buy that, I just do not.
    LEGO used to be White, Black, Yellow, Blue, Green, Brown, Grey, Dark Grey and Red for a long time.. Then the Bleys came, new Browns, new reds, etc etc..
    There are FAR too many color options IMO. Now I get that there are option to be had, earth colors and what not, but now you have light tan, dark tan, dark red, Reddish brown, olive green dark green, Dark blue, etc. Orange, burnt orange (or what ever they call that one now). Some people call that amazing, and while I like the selection I think it is just too busy IMO.
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,923


    Aanchir said:



    Beyond that, the LEGO Group still keeps the number of parts in production in any given year closely in check. I remember reading a comment by somebody working for the LEGO Group at one point that summed it up nicely — people pay very close attention to which new parts show up each year, but pay far less attention to how many stop being used at the same time.

    The number of colors has also been kept closely in check. There are currently 40 solid colors, 14 transparent colors, and seven or eight metallic colors being used in sets. Fewer than 64 colors total. Back before the LEGO Group reduced their color palette, there were over 100 colors on the palette, some of which were only used for one or two sets.

    I do not buy that, I just do not.
    LEGO used to be White, Black, Yellow, Blue, Green, Brown, Grey, Dark Grey and Red for a long time.. Then the Bleys came, new Browns, new reds, etc etc..
    There are FAR too many color options IMO. Now I get that there are option to be had, earth colors and what not, but now you have light tan, dark tan, dark red, Reddish brown, olive green dark green, Dark blue, etc. Orange, burnt orange (or what ever they call that one now). Some people call that amazing, and while I like the selection I think it is just too busy IMO.
    Perhaps too busy for some people compared to the olden days, but it's way better than when the LEGO Group was in crisis, and that's what I thought people were comparing TLG's current color palette to.

    The expansion of the color palette began long before the 2004 introduction of the bleys and new browns, which didn't really make the palette any bigger at all, considering that an existing grey or brown color was removed from the palette for every new one added.

    Colors like Brick Yellow (Bricklink's Tan), Nougat (Bricklink's Flesh), Bright Green, Light Yellow, Light Green, Light Reddish Violet (Bricklink's Pink), Pastel Blue (Maersk Blue), Light Orange Brown (Bricklink's Earth Orange), Medium Reddish Violet (Bricklink's Dark Pink), Medium Green, and Dark Orange (I guess that's the color you call Burnt Orange) had all been on the palette for over a decade prior to that, just not for basic System bricks. That's not even mentioning the other obscure colors used in themes like Duplo and Fabuland, some of which I still haven't identified on the LEGO Group's official color palette — they had been discontinued long before the LEGO Group started cataloging parts online.

    Personally, I'm quite happy with the current palette. There aren't so many colors that you'd be likely to confuse two colors in a side-by-side comparison, unlike in the early naughts. The color we have the most variants of is green, which has seven different variants. But the only two green colors that are particularly easy to confuse are Bright Green and Dark Green — two of the oldest green colors, both of which have been appearing in sets since at least 1993.

    And of course another great thing about the current color palette is that a number of decades-old colors like Nougat and Bright Green are finally being used for basic bricks! People regularly mistake these for "new colors", but they aren't, not by a long shot.
  • AleyditaAleydita BelgiumMember Posts: 934
    Sorry to butt in but can anyone point me in the direction of an 'official' (-ish) colour list?
  • plantmanplantman Member Posts: 97
    @Pitfall69 - can't thank you enough for that link. I've been trying to figure out what the green sponge guy I loved as a kid was - don't know why but it was one of my favorite toys - and there he was - Nerf Man!
    Pitfall69
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,923
    Aleydita said:

    Sorry to butt in but can anyone point me in the direction of an 'official' (-ish) colour list?

    I assume you're asking about the current color palette? The most accurate and up-to-date list I know of is in LEGO Digital Designer. Any colors in the Solid, Transparent, and Metallic categories on LDD Extended Mode are in the current palette, with the exceptions of 208 Light Stone Grey and 294 Phosphorescent Green (both discontinued). There are a couple colors on the current palette not listed on LDD, though, specifically Warm Gold, Drum Lacquered (Bricklink's Metallic Gold) and Cool Silver, Drum Lacquered.

    If you want a comprehensive list of all LEGO colors past and present, Brickset's list (sourced from the LEGO Group's customer service replacement parts database) comes close, but the names are abbreviated and thus sometimes a little hard to interpret. I have an Excel spreadsheet here that I try to keep up-to-date as well. Among other things, it describes which LEGO color names correspond to which Bricklink color names. It's not 100% complete, though, and a lot of colors do not have a direct 1:1 relationship between the LEGO Group's naming system and Bricklink's.

    If you want an online reference tool for comparing Bricklink's color names and TLG's, the Peeron color list is one of the best I know, but it is not 100% complete or 100% accurate (for instance, TLG's Silver Flip/Flop is not at all the same thing as Bricklink's Flat Silver). Still an incredibly useful reference tool.
    CCC
  • OldfanOldfan Chicagoland, IL, USAMember Posts: 675
    ^^Ask @Aanchir if he's published his list yet...or check Basebrick or Bricklink or Peeron for their color comparison charts
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,923
    I forgot to mention: This is another useful resource. It's from 2011, but the changes to the color palette since then have been few. Namely, 294 Phosphorescent Green was discontinued and replaced with 329 White Glow, 208 Light Stone Grey was discontinued, and 330 Olive Green was added to the palette. So other than the absence of metalized (chrome) and lacquered (metallic) colors, the NUMBER of colors on that palette (57) should still be accurate today.
  • shawn_lowshawn_low Member Posts: 27
    TLG doesn't get to be the world's most profitable toy company but selling cheap. It's an expensive hobby once you start collecting certain set ranges. For example, modulars or 10XXX sets. Each one is US$199 and above. Toss in say Star Wars or a licensed range into the mix. Multiply that by several sets per years and the hobby will costs you thousands.

    Seeing all the clone brands has made me a little peeved at Lego pricing. If a clone brand can have say 75% of Lego quality for 10% of the RRP, do the maths on Lego's margins. Yes, they have overheads, staff, etc. But the proof is in the numbers: in 2013, sales for TLG were up more than 10% on last year. Revenue in 2012 was $4 BILLION up 25% on 2011.

    Of course, guys in the US have it good: Lego, once it gets out of the US, ends up being marked up insanely. Take Malaysia for example: the local distributor marks up WAY (and I'm talking more than 15%) over US RRP. In Singapore, prices convert anywhere between 5-40% higher than US RRP. In Australia, the Sea Cow RRP converts to US$331. OUCH. etc etc.

    Is collecting Lego getting prohibitively expensive? Yes.
  • monkeyhangermonkeyhanger Member Posts: 3,013

    Limited editions should be priced significantly higher. Like 41999. It was easily foreseeable that it would be a quick sellout. Lego left money on the table.

    It's far more palettable to think that a reseller is the reason for sky high prices than TLG. TLG created an aftermarket high price by making it limited, I think there would have been uproar if TLG tried to make a fast buck by charging £250/$350 for something that seems to blow TLG's normal pricing strategy out of the water, just because they made so few of them by design.

  • PaperbackwriterPaperbackwriter Member Posts: 105
    Uproar or not, most AFOLs are sheep. They would have made a little noise and flocked to buy it.
    FollowsClosely
  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    shawn_low said:

    If a clone brand can have say 75% of Lego quality for 10% of the RRP, do the maths on Lego's margins.

    After a recent experiment of my own with a Call of Duty MB set, I daresay that the competitive quality is not nearly as low as 75%. Though in fairness, the rrp wasn't nearly as low as 10% either.

  • legogallegogal USMember Posts: 755
    It could be that space limitations are/will be having a large negative impact on LEGO sales as folks run out of space to display and play with their toys. So it may not just be a pricing issue. It seems that many AFOL's often mention this problem.

    Today I returned Sydney opera house because the box is too large and heavy to store up high in the closet and the set is too large built for us easily to display it. Our LEGO store took it back with no questions because that was where we bought it and it was still sealed. I brought home spare copies of two other smaller modulars, The Pet Shop and the Parisian Restaurant, and will most likely use them for parts. And we won't be considering buying any other giant sets after learning this lesson.

    How many others have run out of space for their collections?

  • PaperbackwriterPaperbackwriter Member Posts: 105
    edited February 2014
    ^
    Interesting. It could start an entire debate on whether someone should be buying toys when someone doesn't have enough living space to maximize their enjoyment of them. Not trying to be critical. I grew up in an 800 square foot house (family of five). Now that I'm old, I have 4500 square feet with just the wife and me. Plenty of room for Lego, dogs, collections of stuff that the administrator of my estate will undoubtedly say 'why the hell did he buy this?'

    With that said, even with that much space I don't 'warehouse' boxes of unopened Lego sets. I buy to build, not to hoard under the guise of 'investing'.
    mathewLegoFanTexas
  • YellowcastleYellowcastle Northern VirginiaAdministrator, Moderator Posts: 5,232
    Dear Abby,

    Is it fair for someone brand new to the hobby to paint all sealed box collectors as delusional hoarders?

    Sincerely,

    8 yo modular fan
    BanditBumblepantspharmjodTheLoneTensorThanos75margotFollowsCloselyLegoFanTexasEKSam
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,813
    Space is a pricing / financial issue too. Buy a bigger house / shed.
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 10,167
    edited February 2014
    This space issue is why I have not opened many of my sets I have recently purchased. I am currently in an apt. It is a fairly large apt, but not so large as to display my in box sets, let alone the open sets I already have stashed. I leave them in the boxes because if I decide I cannot really build and display much of this (or have a place to part them out to) then I will simply sell it off and just stick to keeping what I really really want to display someday as I really do want to display.
    I did this once with my classic sets (space town castle and Pirate) I narrowed it down to basically town/city keeping a few classic 80's castle sets. and even then I have amassed such a collection I have three fairly large tupperware bins filed along with two bins that hold in box sets from the 80's. Part of me REALLY wanted to keep my substantial Space and Pirate collection but I just do not have the room for it. I can only imagine what it will look like when I build my sets of all the mod sets. I have them since Market Street (yes i know technically not a mod) and Cafe Corner up to Palace Cinema and about to get the Parisan restaurant, only because Id rather buy one and have it stored than not and wind up having to pay dearly for one later if I wanted it.

    Dear Abby,

    Is it fair for someone brand new to the hobby to paint all sealed box collectors as delusional hoarders?

    Sincerely,

    8 yo modular fan

    I think @Yellowcastle just stumbled on the next reality show... 'Hobby Hoarders'.
  • BanditBandit Member Posts: 890



    I think @Yellowcastle just stumbled on the next reality show... 'Hobby Hoarders'.

    It already exists -- it's called Collection Intervention.
    Pitfall69
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,098
    The sad truth is that many AFOL, and I see it here, are hoarders. How can you post a picture featuring fifty or more stacked boxes of un-opened Lego sets and not admit that you have a problem?
    LegoFanTexas
  • BumblepantsBumblepants DFWMember Posts: 6,997
    It is only a problem when other areas of your life are negatively impacted.
    charlatan13pharmjodYellowcastleFollowsCloselydougtsJeffHLegoFanTexasbluedragonwoony2
  • charlatan13charlatan13 Member Posts: 118
    Wow. Didn't know Collection Intervention was a real show. I assume the interventions have to fit the reality standards of visual impact like Hoarders. It'd be funny to see an intervention of a stamp collector (I can't even pay bills on my desk since there are so many non-organized stamps!)

    I agree about the negative impact - if you don't have the space or are spending money you don't have - might be time to reassess your priorities.
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,098

    It is only a problem when other areas of your life are negatively impacted.

    Denial.

  • DadDad UKMember Posts: 816
    ^You shouldn't have problems. You should have solutions.
  • BumblepantsBumblepants DFWMember Posts: 6,997
    Um... nope. Not even a MISB collector.
  • rancorbaitrancorbait Manitoba CanadaMember Posts: 1,850
    mathew said:

    The sad truth is that many AFOL, and I see it here, are hoarders. How can you post a picture featuring fifty or more stacked boxes of un-opened Lego sets and not admit that you have a problem?

    There is a more appropriate word for that, its "collecting". And at what point of acquiring sets does it become a problem, and why? If one enjoys collecting sets, no problem, its his money! As long as the hobby isn't interfering with more important needs I don't see how it is a problem.
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,098
    ^ Poor Lego all boarded up. It's a bit depressing actually.
    VaderX
  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    edited February 2014
    @Paperbackwriter, would you please stop browbeating us with your negative attitude towards that which a lot of us enjoy? It's one thing to point out what you consider to be a flawed thing, hell, I did it with Mixels (sorry @Margot), but seeing it over and over and over gets tiring.

    Oh yeah, nobody cares how much money you have either, so stop with the references. We got it after your 6th distinct example (and btw, you're up to 8 now).

    Signed, the Internet.
    cheshirecatdougtsnkx1
  • DadDad UKMember Posts: 816
    ^ I'm sure you wouldn't find it depressing if it was in your basement.
    Pitfall69LostInTranslation
  • margotmargot Member Posts: 2,310
    Re Mixels, built them all... not a fan, won't be getting more.
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,098
    Dad said:

    ^ I'm sure you wouldn't find it depressing if it was in your basement.

    You are correct. With that said, I would have been ebay'd half of them by this time. And cracked open the others to build. There's a small fortune in that picture. You better have them insured.
  • rancorbaitrancorbait Manitoba CanadaMember Posts: 1,850
    mathew said:

    There's a small fortune in that picture. You better have them insured.

    "Are you threatening me master Jedi?"

    ;o)
  • DadDad UKMember Posts: 816
    mathew said:

    Dad said:

    ^ I'm sure you wouldn't find it depressing if it was in your basement.

    You are correct. With that said, I would have been ebay'd half of them by this time. And cracked open the others to build. There's a small fortune in that picture. You better have them insured.
    Can't blame you but it's each to their own. This type of collecting doesn't even get me thinking like that. I've spent a lot of my life in the die cast model car game, I'm talking old stuff. But at the same toy fairs are the train collectors. Now they do get me thinking....they freak me out. Seriously, some of them are like what you see on the tv where there are passageways in their houses. There are some very strange people in that game.....

    You might find this strange. I collect stuff because I would rather have stuff than have money sat in the bank. Anyone who was born in the early 70's and had a bmx in the late 70's or early 80's will know all about Skyway.

    Anytime I want I can build a 1983 Skyway TA. I have all the components, all original and new old stock. All in mint condition as per the day they were made. The only thing that isn't in it's original packaging is the number plate, but it is mint. I've got £100 in the brake pads alone. Will I ever build it? Part of me thinks I will, probably one sunny day I'll think b*ll*cks, I'm going to build that thing and ride it up town and get a milk shake. That milk shake will cost me at least £1000.

    Will I ever open some of my misb Lego? Not a chance. That's because I can appreciate the artwork on the box, and knowing that I can open it and build it satisfies any desire I have to do so. It's a personal thing.

    But the Skyway? I sort of want to share that with people, or perhaps I just want to go back for a day to when I was thirteen.

    We're all different, it's what makes it interesting. But none of us should knock the next man just because we don't see things their way.


    dougts
  • PaperbackwriterPaperbackwriter Member Posts: 105
    edited February 2014
    I don't know where 'all' and 'delusional' were use by me as far as hoarding is concerned. And, interesting to see I'm so far inside of someone's head that they actually count and categorize the content of my posts. Here's the deal, if nobody complains about Lego prices or ridiculous ebay auctions, I wont keep letting you know that some people can afford them and don't care.

    And, Mathew, stop talking about stacks of unopened boxes. Its like when I used to talk to one of my alcoholic relatives about their problem, which, according to them.....wasn't a problem.

    Finally, forty years ago I was basically homeless due to my own poor judgement. Ain't no more, and proud of it. Not rich, but got enough so that I'm not all that concerned about lego prices or investing in lego.

    Enjoy the build......
  • DadDad UKMember Posts: 816
    ^ So far inside their head?
    Is that what you think that you're inside @TheLoneTensor head?
    I'm asking a serious question in response to your post.
  • PaperbackwriterPaperbackwriter Member Posts: 105
    Well, since this isn't a serious matter, I'll probably not be able to help you out.
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