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For those that have seen The LEGO Movie [SPOILER WARNING]

2

Comments

  • rancorbaitrancorbait Manitoba CanadaMember Posts: 1,850
    Lol, I know, it was just a joke... :o)
  • dannyrwwdannyrww WisconsinMember Posts: 1,395
    I loved the movie...made me feel a little guilty for all the times I tell my daughters to not play with my Lego sets. In fact I got a couple "looks" from my wife during the last part of the movie. I like the humor and loved the twist at the end with the father and the son. Even though there were a lot of real world items I didn't think they would go there and in the manner that they did. In a lot of regards it changed what was really happening a great deal. I liked the cameos (Milhouse surprised me and was a little off putting with his simpson head). Also interesting to see how dialogue was redone from some trailers , like Batman's always building in black. The original trailer we saw had him say that when Emmet asked if he could get a batwing in orange if I recall. At any rate my daughters were very excited to see the movie with me and it reminded all of us of the importance of playing with our toys (having kids is great since you have an excuse to play). Also my girls are excited that they will finally have friends to talk about the movie with. It was cute seeing them last week tell every kid in school that they would not tell them how the Lego movie ended. I actually had quite a few students trying to get it out of me too.
    YellowcastleLostInTranslation
  • dragonhawkdragonhawk USMember Posts: 633
    I am not going to reiterate the praises for the movie as stated in posts above. I think the plot was great for a children movie ;) with enough jokes for the adults.
    The "That's just a guideline" line got the most laugh from the audience in our theatre.

    One nitpick, my son was disappointed that Lloyd (green Ninjago) did not say anything or had any major part in the movie. Even Green Lantern had a lot more screen time than Lloyd.

    Did anyone else caught #9448 Samurai Mech on one of the monitors towards the end ?

    I can't wait to get my hands on the Spaceship Spaceship Spaceship :)
  • DougoutDougout Member Posts: 888

    Too late to edit, but did anyone else see a lego simpsons millhouse figure in the meeting thingy in cloud cuckoo land ?

    Yea, he was one of the master builders......Does that mean there are more Simpsons Legos coming? Was it just a random cameo?
  • tomalphintomalphin Member Posts: 248
    edited February 2014
    I loved the movie - it was much better than I expected, and had more serious subthemes than I expected (conformism, overbearing commercialism, etc...). Not much in the way of dirty jokes for the adults, but that's ok.

    I enjoyed the stop motion style, and appreciated that almost everything in the world was made of Lego. I love that the characters really built things in the movie, and the way the master builders can see individual bricks in "bullet time" was awesome. (I wish I could memorize the part numbers that easily - a clear reference to AFOL obsession.)

    My wife almost died when she saw that lord business uses the same Akro-mils bins that I use. Apparently I am the physical embodiment of 80's space man when he finally gets to make his awesome space ship. "oh boy, oh boy, oh boy!"

    Had a great time, we went with 2 other couples - lots of adults (AFOL?) in the audience.
  • swind15swind15 Member Posts: 12

    mom and I saw it this afternoon. She enjoyed it but I really didn't care for it that much.

    Don't get me wrong, the graphics of this movie were amazing and there's enough hidden stuff/stuff to see that I could probably watch it 10 times and never catch everything and there are some golden moments(LOVED the construction scene where they are building and singing) but it really feels like they put almost all the effort into the animation/easter eggs/stuff to see and not enough on building a creative plot.

    really? the "movie is just the imagination of someone else" plot? that's the type of plot you could get away with if this was about 10 or 15 years ago or maybe if you think you'll get mostly the "we like the same type of plot over and over again" crew, but it did NOT work for me.

    I was expecting this really epic and creative plot out of the minds of one of the largest toy companies out there, not a been there done that plot. Yea, the plot was ok but after one point, it seemed to just drag on and on.

    do I regret my choice of requesting to go see the movie? judging by the current budget we have for fun stuff combined with a couple other factors, i'll say no I don't regret my choice of requesting to go see it but I won't be in a rush for the sequel.

    I agree about the ending with the human actors being somewhat of a disappointment, but the Emmet figure did in fact move on his own while he was on the table, so maybe the toys are alive in a sense and it's not just the imagination of the kid. Perhaps, it can be compared to something similar to the "Toy Story" premise, but instead of the toys knowing who god(Andy) was, these toys(lego) weren't as aware. Hopefully, the sequel will expand on all this and maybe Emmet will enlighten everyone else. Who knows, maybe some of the minifigs will go through a depression when they realize that they're just a child's "play thing" haha.
  • Wil348Wil348 Member Posts: 240

    Just saw a little clip of Emmet taking a shower...

    First ever PG rated movie to contain full nudity?!

    :oP

    Bart skateboards naked in The Simpsons Movie, and if I recall correctly, uncensored.
  • sidersddsidersdd USAMember Posts: 2,432


    I was expecting this really epic and creative plot out of the minds of one of the largest toy companies out there, not a been there done that plot. Yea, the plot was ok but after one point, it seemed to just drag on and on.

    The movie, and plot, were creations of Warner Bros, not The LEGO Group. My understanding is TLG were only consulted with. This is a Warner Bros creation inspired by LEGO.
  • ACWWGal2011ACWWGal2011 Member Posts: 534
    Yea, he was one of the master builders......Does that mean there are more Simpsons Legos coming? Was it just a random cameo?
    well.... there is always the Simpsons CMFs that he could be in. I don't think they revealed those yet.
  • peterlinddkpeterlinddk DenmarkMember Posts: 170
    nonex said:

    Did anybody spot the set number on Emmet's "Instructions for Life"? I thought it was #6869... but that would be Quinjet Aeriel Battle, so not much of an Easter Egg?

    I've found a clip on youtube, and there it has number #6981, which is a Blacktron Aerial Intruder - but perhaps Octan set-numbers are different from LEGO set-numbers?

    By the way - the CMF-edition of Emmet comes with the "Instructions for Life" tile - however it is impossible to read the text on it.
  • bricktuarybricktuary Krakozhia (temporarily stuck in London)Member Posts: 869
    Just back. Absolutely loved it. Will read the rest of this thread and give my detailed thoughts later.
    But I'm still grinning.
  • alijoezacalijoezac UK, NottinghamMember Posts: 536
    I really enjoyed it too ... my favourite line? The pirate pointing out the problem he has scratching his bum with a hook for a hand.
    StormKitty
  • LegopantsLegopants GermanyMember Posts: 2,091
    Well, I can't wait to see it - dubbed into German :-S
    Not out over here until April :-(
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,098
    Great movie. My oldest son enjoyed it a lot. My wife nudged me during Will Farrell's rant. I'm happy that they tied in the AFOL angle though it was a little forced that he would resort to glueing together his sets. He had at least $75K worth of Lego in his basement.

    Anyway, I'm a little distraught that Benny's spaceship won't be available until summer. Bad call there since it's one of the highlights of the movie and would probably sell well right now.
    FollowsClosely
  • ACWWGal2011ACWWGal2011 Member Posts: 534
    edited February 2014
    maybe lego thought the movie would last well into the summer months and that'd be good advertising.

    Tragic truth is these days a ton of movies, no matter how good or popular, don't seem to last more then a few months or so b4 going to dvd.
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,098
    Actually Brickipedia says March, but $125... uh, I thought it was going to be $100. I'll have to wait on a sale.
  • durazno33durazno33 Member Posts: 47
    As far as the movie goes, I enjoyed it and I thought it was funny. That being said, several points of the plot delivery lacked development and cohesion. What I mean is, the movie is about Emmet and the Lego minifigures right? Wrong! Deep into the show, you learn that everything in the movie is only a symbol of an external conflict. Because of this late development, the internal plot does not connect very well with the external plot. This is partially due to the lack of character development in the external plot. I think that the movie should have started off more like "Princess Bride" does with the Grandpa reading a book to his grandson as this would have provided a well-founded framework for the movie.
  • chuxtoyboxchuxtoybox Member Posts: 711
    This is one of those movies where the more I think about it the less sense it makes! What was the final message supposed to be?

    Everybody's special? Lord Business is the reflection of real dad Will Ferrell. Did Will Ferrell need to be told he was special? He had a million dollar Lego setup in his basement! I think that made him pretty fraggin special already!

    Was the message let your kids play with things you told them not to touch?

    Was the message Lego is for children, and how would a "normal" adult who doesn't play with toys anymore relate to this?

    durazno33dougts
  • HarryPotterLoverHarryPotterLover Member Posts: 238
    Just got back. The "stop motion" style animation was interesting and fit but it was harder to see references and details with all of the pieces moving individually at once.

    I figured as I was watching I would begin to want all of the sets. Some of them I defiantly will but others are a little subpar. Chances are I will end up with them anyhow :D

    The amount of references they do make is perfect for any adult seeing the movie. (There were plenty of adults seeing the movie by themselves as well)
    I honestly did cringe at the thought of all the pieces being glued together :{}

    My Point of View Overall- EVERYTHING IS AWSOME!
  • Wil348Wil348 Member Posts: 240
    Legopants said:

    Well, I can't wait to see it - dubbed into German :S
    Not out over here until April :-(

    I'm in a similar situation. I live in France but I'm English, and the local cinema said that the earliest they'll get the English version is April, even then it's not a definite.

    Hopefully the DVD won't be too long, one site predicts that it will be out in May.
  • SirBenSirBen In the Hall of the Mountain KingMember Posts: 585

    What was the final message supposed to be?

    I thought is was that "Everything is awesome when you build your dreams."

    I appreciated what I saw as three plot-lines weaving themselves through the movie: Emmet's search for personal significance, The Master Builders' war on Kragle, and the tension of being an AFOL with children and sharing your hobby with them. I think this last point is transferable to other hobbies as well, encouraging parents to be involved the lives of their children and involving their children in their lives/hobbies as well.

    bluemodernmargotpharmjodMathBuilderskherbeckJenniSapmiSatan
  • Rainstorm26Rainstorm26 Chicago Burbs USA (and sometimes Ireland)Member Posts: 1,004
    edited February 2014
    It was awesome! I built my daughter an invisible jet out of clear bricks this weekend and my son just finished a double decker couch.
    MathBuilder
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,923

    This is one of those movies where the more I think about it the less sense it makes! What was the final message supposed to be?

    Everybody's special? Lord Business is the reflection of real dad Will Ferrell. Did Will Ferrell need to be told he was special? He had a million dollar Lego setup in his basement! I think that made him pretty fraggin special already!

    Was the message let your kids play with things you told them not to touch?

    Was the message Lego is for children, and how would a "normal" adult who doesn't play with toys anymore relate to this?

    The main message, as I got it, was that there's no one way to build or live your life, and that being a free society — or a family — means accepting each other's differences and learning to compromise.

    President Business and "The Man Upstairs" alike were utterly convinced that there was a single right way to do things, and were prepared to glue the world together to keep things "how they were supposed to be". In contrast, the Master Builders were creative free spirits — but each one had their own way of doing things, and when they all followed their own creative impulses they worked at cross-purposes.

    Emmet telling Lord Business he didn't have to be the bad guy was him taking the first step to achieve that kind of compromise. As he explained, everyone is special in some way — but to let people be special, you have to give them room to be themselves, and you can't always get things your way.

    The Man Upstairs had only allowed his son Finn a small bucket of bricks to play with. He wasn't able to understand his son's wild creativity, therefore, like President Business, he tried to keep it contained. In the end, he realized that if he was ever going to be close to his son and not seem like "the bad guy", he was going to have to put forth a stronger effort to be understanding. Therefore, he stopped telling his son what to do and started asking questions, including the question that finally helped him and his son put their differences aside — "What would Emmet say to President Business?" That's the question that finally got him the answer he needed to hear.
    bluemodernDougoutmurphquakeskherbeckBumblepants
  • rocaorocao Administrator Posts: 4,290
    edited February 2014
    I found it very distracting that the plot was so similar to "The Matrix" that it was essentially just a LEGO version of it. I started listing the similarities, but it's such a long list and the similarities are so obvious that I decided not to list them. I'm still not sure if the moviemakers intention was for it to be a spoof or if they were hoping most people wouldn't notice or care.

    Stepping outside of my AFOL self, I would grade it as a solid B. Good, but not great. It's definitely the best kids movie since Frozen, and at least on par with Frozen. A lot of my points of praise have been mentioned, so I won't re-list them.

    As an AFOL, I'm more torn.

    I feel as if I'm supposed to like it by default because it increases awareness of our hobby, much in the same way I was supposed to like the deluge of poker TV shows while I was playing semi-professionally because it brought new people into the fold. Because I feel this expectation, I'm looking at the movie with a more critical eye.

    The jokes and references geared towards FOL's were fun. However, I felt they could have been executed better. Take the scene where WildStyle was assembling the cycle in the alley. She started scanning and identifying pieces by their LEGO element IDs. We all get the reference, but there was nothing more that came of it.

    Imagine if the following would have happened instead:
    WildStyle, after finishing the cycle: "We need to get out of her fast. Quick use these!" She tosses Emmet some Ice Cream Scoop pieces.
    Emmet raises a perplexed eyebrow, shrugs, and then eats a piece.
    "What are you doing?! Nevermind, I'll do it" WildStyle grabs the scoops and throws them towards the exhaust, where they click in, and the cycle immediately launches forward.
    Emmet: "Whoa! I didn't know Ice Cream could do that."
    WildStyle: "It wasn't Ice Cream, silly. It was smoke for the rocket exhaust. And where there's smoke, there's fire"
    Emmet: "It looked like Ice Cream to me. Tasted like it, too."
    WildStyle: "That's because that's how you saw it. There are only 16000 elements in our world and they make up everything in it. Every thing is also something else."
    Emmet: "What about this car door?"
    WildStyle: "Toilet roll.. " Rips it off and throws it to someone waiting to use a portapotty, who smiles appreciatively but bashfully.
    "And these?"
    "Garbage can lids."
    "These?"
    "I said EVERYTHING."
    "These?" pointing to some BURPS that they zip by.
    "Erm... ok maybe not everything."

    I think that could be universally funny, and get the layperson thinking about LEGO.

    Another example was when Batman said "I only work in Black. .... and sometimes very very dark gray". I thought it was funny, and it works as a joke for the layperson. But imagine instead what was said was "I only work in Black... and sometimes dark gray", holds up brick. "And dark stone gray" holds up brick. "Even light bluish gray when I'm in a lighter mood." holds up brick. "But never light gray. That stuff fades." The layperson would then get an idea of the diverse LEGO palette.
    YellowcastleStormKittyLegoManiaccTheBigLegoskiJosephbinaryeye
  • joeejoee Member Posts: 42
    I took my 6 year old to see it and probably my favourite part was the ending and remembering my "Emmet" I had as a child and the adventures he'd go on. It made me realize that I've become the man upstairs, not in a way that I keep my lego from my children. (though I'm in a perpetual rebuilding around here). But that when I build with Lego now it's more to look at and appreciate, rather have a hero to go on adventures with/through "Emmet" anymore.
    FollowsCloselyTheBigLegoski
  • legodwarf321legodwarf321 Member Posts: 9
    (SPOILERS) One of the things I love about Lego is that the mini-figs have always been races-less, it's something the Lego group (TLG) prides themselves on (The only exceptions are licensed themes for obvious reasons). Yet in this movie, they created a non-licened black character then proceeded to kill him. First, why make him black at all, when it goes against what TLG stands for. Second, why kill him? He's a toy, and they show plenty of other characters with their heads off that didn't die, just put his head back on. Thirdly, his death was pointless, he still said what he had to say(but as a ghost). Lastly, he's the ONLY non-robot character in the whole film to die. This was a great movie, with tons of social commentary, and yet they went OUT OF THEIR WAY to stick to this racist norm. If anything had been different (Him just being yellow, him not dying, which was completely pointless, anyone else dying) I would have been okay with this. But this goes against what TLG stands for, and it ruined what should have been a great movie for me and my family. Sorry for being serious.
  • ninjagolightlyninjagolightly Member Posts: 140
    The message was pure toxic Hollywood pablum in three easy pieces: "Believe in yourself and you can achieve anything"; "Don't let anybody else's rules hinder you from doing whatever you want"; "Corporations are bad, capitalism is bad, now please buy our products." We have all seen these messages hundreds of times before. It never changes because the people who run Hollywood (a) actually believe all these things through the boundless power of cognitive dissonance, and (b) correctly deduce that these beliefs resonate with the mass audience at an emotional level.

    Since every Hollywood movie has the same message elements in slightly different proportions, along with the blatant wish-fulfillment of "The guy the girl you love is with is a jerk and she will realize you are better and fall in love with you," it turns out that the "message" is quite irrelevant to whether a movie is any good. That is determined instead by the qualities of visual and narrative storytelling. As through human history, there is always great literature with a terrible message/values. And crappy literature with exactly the same values. Great literature also with a great message comes along once or twice per generation, maybe.

    So, TLM is an excellent piece of entertainment that is not rendered less enjoyable by its crass ideology. And that is the best anyone can hope for from Hollywood in our time. So I watched it with my kid, enjoyed it, and afterward he asked me, "Is it true that everything is awesome when you're part of a team?" I sat him down and said, "Absolutely not. Sometimes it can be miserable to be part of a team. Don't believe that or anything else they said in that movie. Or anything in any movie." It was a great teachable moment.
    pharmjodDougoutdougtsbinaryeye
  • byolegobyolego Member Posts: 114
    SPACESHIP!
    Dougout
  • swind15swind15 Member Posts: 12

    (SPOILERS) One of the things I love about Lego is that the mini-figs have always been races-less, it's something the Lego group (TLG) prides themselves on (The only exceptions are licensed themes for obvious reasons). Yet in this movie, they created a non-licened black character then proceeded to kill him. First, why make him black at all, when it goes against what TLG stands for. Second, why kill him? He's a toy, and they show plenty of other characters with their heads off that didn't die, just put his head back on. Thirdly, his death was pointless, he still said what he had to say(but as a ghost). Lastly, he's the ONLY non-robot character in the whole film to die. This was a great movie, with tons of social commentary, and yet they went OUT OF THEIR WAY to stick to this racist norm. If anything had been different (Him just being yellow, him not dying, which was completely pointless, anyone else dying) I would have been okay with this. But this goes against what TLG stands for, and it ruined what should have been a great movie for me and my family. Sorry for being serious.

    I think they were going with a "Star Wars/Obi Wan Kenobi" type scenario there. Which is high praise for the Vitruvius character. Plus, he came back in ghost form, so he really didn't die completely haha. IMO when his head died and he came back in ghost form were some of the funniest scenes in the movie.
    bluemodern
  • nonexnonex Member Posts: 15
    At the risk of sounding pedantic (I'm often at risk of this) is Vitruvius even a "black character" as @legodwarf321 says? It terms of Bricklink classification he's skin is "Medium Dark Flesh", the same colour plastic as used in Lone Ranger sets for Native Americans. I suppose the filmmakers could have perceived him as a light-skinned black man. Is the fact that he's voiced by a black actor what gives him his racial characteristic? Is Donkey from Shrek a "black character"? So many identity questions here!

  • YellowcastleYellowcastle Northern VirginiaAdministrator, Moderator Posts: 5,232
    I'm a bit surprised by some of the cynicism above, especially from a cartoon movie about a children's toy that we all refuse to give up in our adulthood.

    As for the criticisms from @rocao, I think I agree that it would have been so easy to throw fans a few more nuggets like references to BLEY or 10179 or Jack Stone or Monorails, etc. They ran through some iffy old themes but it was so quick I didn't really get to appreciate it. But that's what I love about Pixar, the throw away moments for kids that are like candy to adults. That's always been my criticism of any movie built upon an existing fervent fan base. I think you owe it to them to throw them a few bones in the movie. I just wanted a few more here.

    And maybe another song or two as well. The construction sing along was nice.
    margotbluemodern
  • margotmargot Member Posts: 2,310
    I didn't realize Vitrivius was black. Are you sure you're not projecting that because he is voiced by Morgan Freeman?
    bluemodern
  • Poisso3Poisso3 Member Posts: 196

    Too late to edit, but did anyone else see a lego simpsons millhouse figure in the meeting thingy in cloud cuckoo land ?

    Hard not to notice when he was called out by name. ;)

    I thought it was awesome to see an unreleased Simpsons figure in the movie. I did find it was interesting they used Millhouse and not one of the figures that came with the Simpsons house. Just think of how it coul dhave looked if had been Maggie Simpson and not Millhouse. :)
  • legodwarf321legodwarf321 Member Posts: 9
    @swind15 Why would he die with his head off, especially when none of the other characters who lost their heads died? There is a scene in Cloud land where a Mini-fig is playing golf with living Mini-fig heads. It would have been just as funny if he popped up, put his head back on and talked about how taking the head off a mini-fig can't kill it and they were so gullible for thinking it could do to the fact that throughout the movie they've seen it happen without death being the result. @nonex and @margot as I explained, I wouldn't have had a problem with this if he was yellow like every other non-licensed lego character, but they specifically made him "medium dark flesh" which is often used to portray black licensed characters (as well as natives), and goes against TLG stated way of keeping their non-licensed mini-figs race-less. They should have just left him yellow. And no, the fact that he was voiced by Morgan Freeman had nothing to do with it.
  • margotmargot Member Posts: 2,310
    It is curious that he isn't yellow like the other characters.
  • scrumperscrumper UKMember Posts: 323
    I can honestly say that I didn't notice his or any of the other character's colour, they were all just minifigs to me, but I was fascinated by his headband.
    margotdougtsKanohi
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,923

    @swind15 Why would he die with his head off, especially when none of the other characters who lost their heads died? There is a scene in Cloud land where a Mini-fig is playing golf with living Mini-fig heads. It would have been just as funny if he popped up, put his head back on and talked about how taking the head off a mini-fig can't kill it and they were so gullible for thinking it could do to the fact that throughout the movie they've seen it happen without death being the result. @nonex and @margot as I explained, I wouldn't have had a problem with this if he was yellow like every other non-licensed lego character, but they specifically made him "medium dark flesh" which is often used to portray black licensed characters (as well as natives), and goes against TLG stated way of keeping their non-licensed mini-figs race-less. They should have just left him yellow. And no, the fact that he was voiced by Morgan Freeman had nothing to do with it.

    Perhaps he chose to die because "if [Lord Business] strikes him down, he will become more powerful than you could ever imagine" =P

    Anyway, I wouldn't be the least bit surprised if Vitruvius's skin tone were at the request of Morgan Freeman. Just because yellow is supposed to represent all races in non-licensed themes doesn't mean everyone will see it that way, especially in a movie where the cast includes such characters as Shaquille O'Neal, Han Solo, Lando Calrissian, Dumbledore, Gandalf, and Batman/Bruce Wayne with skin tones that are accurate to the characters in question.

    Surprisingly, Vitruvius's skin tone actually looked much lighter to me in the movie than it is in the sets.

    The message was pure toxic Hollywood pablum in three easy pieces: "Believe in yourself and you can achieve anything"; "Don't let anybody else's rules hinder you from doing whatever you want"; "Corporations are bad, capitalism is bad, now please buy our products." We have all seen these messages hundreds of times before. It never changes because the people who run Hollywood (a) actually believe all these things through the boundless power of cognitive dissonance, and (b) correctly deduce that these beliefs resonate with the mass audience at an emotional level.

    Since every Hollywood movie has the same message elements in slightly different proportions, along with the blatant wish-fulfillment of "The guy the girl you love is with is a jerk and she will realize you are better and fall in love with you," it turns out that the "message" is quite irrelevant to whether a movie is any good. That is determined instead by the qualities of visual and narrative storytelling. As through human history, there is always great literature with a terrible message/values. And crappy literature with exactly the same values. Great literature also with a great message comes along once or twice per generation, maybe.

    So, TLM is an excellent piece of entertainment that is not rendered less enjoyable by its crass ideology. And that is the best anyone can hope for from Hollywood in our time. So I watched it with my kid, enjoyed it, and afterward he asked me, "Is it true that everything is awesome when you're part of a team?" I sat him down and said, "Absolutely not. Sometimes it can be miserable to be part of a team. Don't believe that or anything else they said in that movie. Or anything in any movie." It was a great teachable moment.

    I pretty much entirely disagree with the notion that the movie has an anti-business message. After all, the story was resolved when President Business realized "he didn't have to be the bad guy". There was no suggestion that that meant dismantling the Octan corporation.

    President Business was not evil because he ran a giant corporation; he was evil because he tried to use that corporation to control people's lives. Making him a corporate overlord DOES add a bit of deliberate satire, but it's not to suggest that all corporations are evil — it's just that today, big corporations are some of the most powerful entities in the real world. Placing him at the helm of the Octan Corporation makes him a more formidable threat and enables a bit of real-world subtext (in that he controls people not through some esoteric magical powers but through the media).

    It's kind of odd that some right-wing news agencies here in the U.S. have dismissed this movie as anti-corporate drivel, since as president of the Octan Corporation and the world, President Business is just as much a parody of Big Government as he is of Big Business.

    The message that "everything is awesome when you're part of a team" was actually somewhat tongue-in-cheek — don't forget that the song "Everything is Awesome" is one of the tools that President Business uses to keep the populace complacent. Other lines in the song are also in obvious contradiction with the film's message. "I'm the same, I'm like you, you're like me" is supposed to sound like a feel-good message about getting along, when reality it strips people of their individuality. The slower acoustic version even swaps "Everything is better when we stick together" with "No need to rock the boat when we stick together" — something that completely conflicts with the revolutionary ideals of the Master Builders.

    But in the end, the movie is about acceptance and compromise. Emmet brings an end to President Business's plan to glue the world together by reaching a hand out to him and letting him be the hero, not by deposing him. And this value of compromise is perfectly in line with the nature of LEGO as a creative medium. LEGO gets its appeal from a blend of rigid, geometric structure and creative freedom. As we saw with the Master Builders' submarine, creativity without structure can become utter chaos. And structure without creativity tends to lead to blandness, repetition, and a lack of room for individuality. Some people prefer to build by the instructions, and some people prefer to do their own thing. There's nothing wrong with either strategy so long as you allow other people to build and live their lives according to their own creative preference.
    LostInTranslationdannyrwwYellowcastlebluemodernTheBigLegoskiMurdoch17JeffHBuzzsawBumblepants
  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    edited February 2014

    (SPOILERS) One of the things I love about Lego is that the mini-figs have always been races-less, it's something the Lego group (TLG) prides themselves on (The only exceptions are licensed themes for obvious reasons). Yet in this movie, they created a non-licened black character then proceeded to kill him. First, why make him black at all, when it goes against what TLG stands for. Second, why kill him? He's a toy, and they show plenty of other characters with their heads off that didn't die, just put his head back on. Thirdly, his death was pointless, he still said what he had to say(but as a ghost). Lastly, he's the ONLY non-robot character in the whole film to die. This was a great movie, with tons of social commentary, and yet they went OUT OF THEIR WAY to stick to this racist norm. If anything had been different (Him just being yellow, him not dying, which was completely pointless, anyone else dying) I would have been okay with this. But this goes against what TLG stands for, and it ruined what should have been a great movie for me and my family. Sorry for being serious.

    "Don't be so serious. Where's the other guy?"

    My guess is that they didn't say "let's make a black guy," but rather, "let's get one of the best voices in existence and make a character based on that person."
  • dannyrwwdannyrww WisconsinMember Posts: 1,395
    Nobody seems to have a problem that they kept making fun of the fact that he was blind? Just a thought :)
    alijoezac
  • ninjagolightlyninjagolightly Member Posts: 140
    Aanchir said:


    The message that "everything is awesome when you're part of a team" was actually somewhat tongue-in-cheek

    Everything about the movie is somewhat tongue in cheek. Hollywood knows that a soft touch sells better than strident haranguing. The countless vanity project message movies by big stars you will find in the box office flop bin testifies to this.
    Aanchir said:

    But in the end, the movie is about acceptance and compromise. Emmet brings an end to President Business's plan to glue the world together by reaching a hand out to him and letting him be the hero, not by deposing him. And this value of compromise is perfectly in line with the nature of LEGO as a creative medium. LEGO gets its appeal from a blend of rigid, geometric structure and creative freedom. As we saw with the Master Builders' submarine, creativity without structure can become utter chaos. And structure without creativity tends to lead to blandness, repetition, and a lack of room for individuality. Some people prefer to build by the instructions, and some people prefer to do their own thing. There's nothing wrong with either strategy so long as you allow other people to build and live their lives according to their own creative preference.

    You have perfectly encapsulated the cognitive dissonance there. The "own thing" that minifigs prefer to do affects other minifigs. PB "preferred" to have despotic stasis, and this affected the life of every minifig. If we think of the LEGO world as comparable to Minecraft or some other digital building environment (not even getting into the real world) then there inevitably must be "griefers" who go around destroying what other people build because they prefer to live their lives wrecking other people's stuff. The most insightful parts of the film on these complexities were actually the Cloudcuckooland segment where the shallowness and self-contradictions of the counterculture are skewered, and the Duplo invasion at the end, which is basically an open ended invitation to consider the limit cases of "living their lives according to your own creative preference," with the advent of an irrational destructive force in the form of a Duplo-age kid.

    These philosophically cross-cutting moments help make the film, as I said, actually a fairly great work of art despite the heavy dose of Hollywood values. Some may recall that The Incredibles, one of the greatest animated films ever, inspired a vociferous debate among opposing ideological camps trying to claim the movie's message. That was actually a testament to what a sophisticated and profound film it was, in addition to being a rollicking adventure. TLM does not quite soar to that height, but the same forces are in play.

    You and I can debate all this til the break of dawn but a nine year old walks away with, "Evreything is awesome when you're part of a team" and "It's OK for me to break the rules and mess with my Dad's stuff as long as I'm expressing my individuality." Those are logically conflicting messages, but our kids today are trained to accept such. Indeed the rebellion-is-conformity trope has been itself parodied to death... I still recall a classic Tom the Dancing Bug cartoon from 15 years ago that definitively did so.

    I see a bit of a riff on the classic scenario of Cameron's dad's Ferrari in Ferris Bueller... narratively, we identify against the jerk authority figure who won't let his kid have the good stuff he keeps for himself. In reality, is it really true that anyone who owns a valuable vintage auto should allow his teenage son to drive it, or he is a bad person? I honestly don't think so. Should an AFOL with a 6'x4'layout he spent a year on to exhibit at a show not tell his nine year old "hands off!" for fear of stifling the kid's creativity? Hardly.

    TLDR: blah blah blah, four and half star movie.
  • YellowcastleYellowcastle Northern VirginiaAdministrator, Moderator Posts: 5,232
    ^ We're talking about The LEGO Movie, right?
    margotMurdoch17
  • ninjagolightlyninjagolightly Member Posts: 140
    Yeah, it's worth talking about. That sets it apart from 90% of all movies. It's a good thing. I'm a film buff, so I watch a lot of bad movies in my quest to unearth hidden gems. There are things to be learned from bad movies, and REALLY bad movies can be among the most fun to talk about, but generally a good movie makes you actually want to discuss its meaning. Believe me, I couldn't come up with that many words about Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen if you put a gun to my head. Somebody mentioned the Simpsons movie, although that wasn't as good as TLM, that one was also worth talking about.

    Hey, I put a TLDR for the non-film buffs.
  • margotmargot Member Posts: 2,310
    edited February 2014

    Hey, I put a TLDR for the non-film buffs.

    And for the people who don't watch Fox news or any of the 24 hour news channels in the US.
  • YellowcastleYellowcastle Northern VirginiaAdministrator, Moderator Posts: 5,232
    ^^ Most know me to be a cinephile as well and I won't get started on Transformers. But I think there are movies and there are films and then there are somethings in between. I'm just not sure this movie engenders that level of analysis. As much as I appreciate the likes of Raise the Red Lantern, The Bicycle Thief(ves) and Touch of Evil, I don't necessarily try and find great depth in my inexplicable love of Fletch, The Beastmaster, Iron Eagle or Gung Ho.

    And I'm not biased against animated films as I think an argument can certainly be made for several textured and poignant Pixar films, especially Wall-E. I just can't say the same for TLM or even ones I loved ten times more like Over the Hedge.
  • DougoutDougout Member Posts: 888
    Can anyone take a guess at how big those skyscrapers were (stud-length wise) in the scenes with the man upstairs and his kid? I plan to build a skyscraper and I have a 48x48 base, but I think it might be a bit big.
  • DougoutDougout Member Posts: 888
    edited February 2014
    margot said:

    Hey, I put a TLDR for the non-film buffs.

    And for the people who don't watch Fox news or any of the 24 hour news channels in the US.
    I didn't know what you meant here @margot and then I realized you must mean those fancy entertainment shows where the person who yells the most wins.

    Aanchir said:


    The message that "everything is awesome when you're part of a team" was actually somewhat tongue-in-cheek

    Everything about the movie is somewhat tongue in cheek. Hollywood knows that a soft touch sells better than strident haranguing. The countless vanity project message movies by big stars you will find in the box office flop bin testifies to this.
    Aanchir said:

    But in the end, the movie is about acceptance and compromise. Emmet brings an end to President Business's plan to glue the world together by reaching a hand out to him and letting him be the hero, not by deposing him. And this value of compromise is perfectly in line with the nature of LEGO as a creative medium. LEGO gets its appeal from a blend of rigid, geometric structure and creative freedom. As we saw with the Master Builders' submarine, creativity without structure can become utter chaos. And structure without creativity tends to lead to blandness, repetition, and a lack of room for individuality. Some people prefer to build by the instructions, and some people prefer to do their own thing. There's nothing wrong with either strategy so long as you allow other people to build and live their lives according to their own creative preference.

    You have perfectly encapsulated the cognitive dissonance there. The "own thing" that minifigs prefer to do affects other minifigs. PB "preferred" to have despotic stasis, and this affected the life of every minifig. If we think of the LEGO world as comparable to Minecraft or some other digital building environment (not even getting into the real world) then there inevitably must be "griefers" who go around destroying what other people build because they prefer to live their lives wrecking other people's stuff. The most insightful parts of the film on these complexities were actually the Cloudcuckooland segment where the shallowness and self-contradictions of the counterculture are skewered, and the Duplo invasion at the end, which is basically an open ended invitation to consider the limit cases of "living their lives according to your own creative preference," with the advent of an irrational destructive force in the form of a Duplo-age kid.

    These philosophically cross-cutting moments help make the film, as I said, actually a fairly great work of art despite the heavy dose of Hollywood values. Some may recall that The Incredibles, one of the greatest animated films ever, inspired a vociferous debate among opposing ideological camps trying to claim the movie's message. That was actually a testament to what a sophisticated and profound film it was, in addition to being a rollicking adventure. TLM does not quite soar to that height, but the same forces are in play.

    You and I can debate all this til the break of dawn but a nine year old walks away with, "Evreything is awesome when you're part of a team" and "It's OK for me to break the rules and mess with my Dad's stuff as long as I'm expressing my individuality." Those are logically conflicting messages, but our kids today are trained to accept such. Indeed the rebellion-is-conformity trope has been itself parodied to death... I still recall a classic Tom the Dancing Bug cartoon from 15 years ago that definitively did so.

    I see a bit of a riff on the classic scenario of Cameron's dad's Ferrari in Ferris Bueller... narratively, we identify against the jerk authority figure who won't let his kid have the good stuff he keeps for himself. In reality, is it really true that anyone who owns a valuable vintage auto should allow his teenage son to drive it, or he is a bad person? I honestly don't think so. Should an AFOL with a 6'x4'layout he spent a year on to exhibit at a show not tell his nine year old "hands off!" for fear of stifling the kid's creativity? Hardly.

    TLDR: blah blah blah, four and half star movie.
    I don't identify with anyone in Ferris Bueller, I hate that movie, I can't fathom how in the world it became a cult classic. Ferris is a pompous, rich ass and Cameron was way too passive. The comparison here doesn't account for the somewhat ironic fact that Lego is a kids toy and somehow becomes hands off for the kid in the movie when the dad decides his way is best. His way is best for who? Him? That's very selfish. It's certainly not best for his kid, or more importantly him and his kid, which we see at the end when it looks like they have a great deal of fun bonding together with the Legos.

    I think your and everyone's interpretation of the movie, for that matter, has to do with the fundamental philosophies and view of life that we carry as we progress.

    Hollywood may come off as being extremely liberal and very hypocritical at the same time, but I think it is the case of one extreme being not as bad as the other.

    I don't really know of any movie getting morals really right 100%. They all leave far too much hope and optimism to be had just like when you mentioned the idea that "The guy the girl you love is with is a jerk and she will realize you are better and fall in love with you,", but I don't know if telling young kids the honest, upfront truth that "much of society is greedy, judgmental, racist, mean, opportunistic, and hypocritical, people will judge you throughout life no matter what, so you better make good impressions all the time and you may have to work your whole life with only a small amount of recognition in the end, and it is very important to have friends and family to comfort you at all times throughout your struggles". Some things kids will eventually pick up on, some things they will never pick up on. I don't think very many young ones will understand any of this even if you told them upfront, so much of society inherently teaches us that there is a will and a way to make everything fair, it goes against nature that things can't be fair or have some divine meaning to it all.

    IMHO you are partly right though and I couldn't agree more with a bunch of what you said, society constantly gives people conflicting messages. I can't say who is more at fault, but we are constantly being told we should have opinions on things we know nothing about, and that someone else, no matter who, are entitled to have an equal opinion even if they believe that unicorn farts and rainbows will save the world. WRONG, WRONG, WRONG there is always a correct solution. Science should have taught us that by now.
  • ninjagolightlyninjagolightly Member Posts: 140
    Fletch and Beastmaster! "That is also my jam!" (Robot Minion)
    However, Touch of Evil! That is my bugbear movie. I think it is woeful.

    It's interesting how film as a medium inspires some of the most erratic patterns of taste... you will meet someone who likes two or three of your favorite films, which are let's say offbeat choices, and think "Finally someone who sees movies like I do!" And then they will turn and praise a movie you hate, and you're like, "Wha....?" I attribute this to the number of different levels (visually, audibly, temporally, etc.) at which a film operates compared to prose literature or even a play.

    Analyzing "dumb" movies is the best part of being a film buff, to me. Why is "Repo Man" an immortal cult classic while "OC and Stiggs" is a justifiably forgotten turd? Why is Ferris Bueller's Day Off a touchstone while the far superior Three O'Clock High languishes in obscurity?

    15 years from now, it will still be interesting -- to people like me anyway -- to discuss what Unikitty's repressed bipolar tendencies were really all about.
  • murphquakemurphquake Member Posts: 651
    @ninjagolightly because society didn't do this to you, you're just a white suburban punk ;-) #loverepoman

    I think part of the genius of the people behind TLM is that they intentionally set it up to work on many levels for different people. I loved it. I've seen it 4 times already and will see it a few more as opportunity arises.

    Double-Door?
    I'm Gandalf!
    It's Dumbledor!
    Double-Door?

    Like @bmwlego I'm dying to know who's lego room that was or see more pics of the set (and hopefully win a contest for all those storage units!)
  • rancorbaitrancorbait Manitoba CanadaMember Posts: 1,850
    Just saw the movie, which I quite enjoyed!

    The good:

    The stop-motion effect was simply genius! Even though the figures are quite limited with movement they actually did a great job with capturing the right appearance.

    I certainly didn't expect to see such an end to the movie either, its all just a kid building his own models and creating a story, which was pretty cool!

    Han solo, Chewie, and Lando ;o)

    The idea that whole world is made of Lego is pretty darn cool, and its even better when you can actually see it, the water was especially cool!

    Bad cop, was awesome! Part of the reason being the voice of Liam Neeson, which fits the character so well!

    "The prophecy is true... Because it rhymes" Lol.

    The bad:

    Unikitty. At first she was weird, and then got just plain annoying imo.

    Now having seen the movie version of Emmet's construction mech, the official set version looks so disappointing!

    Now "Everything is awesome" is stuck in my head.
  • charlatan13charlatan13 Member Posts: 118
    Fun movie. Appreciate the comments and the different perspectives. I figure if the movie has multiple possible messages = all the better. I heard two different groups of moviegoers singing 'everything is awesome' in the parking lot on the way out which made me smile.
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