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The LEGO that sealed a $600,000 deal for Kroll Ontrack

ColoradoBricksColoradoBricks Denver, CO, USAMember Posts: 1,659
I didn't see this on the forum, thought it was a good little story: The LEGO that sealed a $600,000 deal for Kroll Ontrack
-- sorry had to fix the title in the link...
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Comments

  • PolynicesPolynices United StatesMember Posts: 25
    edited October 2013
    That link really needs a trigger warning for use of the word "legos" in both headline and article body.

    Great story, though!
    andhe
  • tfranklin84tfranklin84 Member Posts: 104
    Really neat story. Thanks for sharing with us!
  • SchwallexSchwallex Member Posts: 121
    I don't get the customer who paid $600,000 for this, rather than spending a hundred bucks on LEGO and doing it themselves.
  • ludzikludzik US (SoCal)Member Posts: 429
    Schwallex said:

    I don't get the customer who paid $600,000 for this, rather than spending a hundred bucks on LEGO and doing it themselves.

    Liability and responsibility for the data. If something goes wrong they have someone to blame.

  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,404
    Plus, it isn't just the LEGO, after the tapes were cleaned, they had to be read and transferred to new tapes.
    madforLEGO
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 10,655
    Great story, and free advert for LEGO
  • SchwallexSchwallex Member Posts: 121
    edited October 2013
    ludzik said:

    Liability and responsibility for the data. If something goes wrong they have someone to blame.

    Now for that $600,000 seems way too little. For tapes that were already ruined before they even got them. The customer already was squarely liable and responsible for that. A contract that's any good would leave the blame right where it belongs. You can't promise to recover something that might no longer be there anyway. And even if you did, you'd have an insurance company to outsource the potential damages to. Every which way I look at it, something's missing.

    Plus, it isn't just the LEGO, after the tapes were cleaned, they had to be read and transferred to new tapes.

    That's my understanding as well, and the point stands: they could have cut the price dramatically by playing with LEGO themselves. I suppose it's simply that they didn't think of it, so pretty much ended up paying for their lack of imagination, and that's fine with me. But it does make me wonder about their initial reaction, and doubly so about their reaction to it being widely publicized. They can't be happy.

    Anyway, my point here is that the article runs rather low on actual information. "Build a LEGO model, get $600,000" is really all there's to it. I'm pretty sure it did not work that way. Of course I realize it's written like that on purpose, but that's only adding insult to injury. I hunger for details!
  • rocaorocao Administrator Posts: 4,290
    Schwallex said:

    That's my understanding as well, and the point stands: they could have cut the price dramatically by playing with LEGO themselves. I suppose it's simply that they didn't think of it, so pretty much ended up paying for their lack of imagination, and that's fine with me.

    It probably wasn't simply a lack of imagination; there was probably a lack of desire to execute it as well.

    When presented with no automated solution, it doesn't take much imagination to realize the need for one. It takes a little more to think of how one might be made. It takes resourcefulness to build one. But the client determined that $600k was worth it for them to offload the entire process to a company that would guarantee the work. If the photo in the article is of the actual device, it looks like the 5700 tapes would have to be manually loaded. In addition to the data recovery process, it doesn't seem the LEGO machine was as much a part of the billed cost as it was an enabler to perform the billed work.

    Also, it's likely the client wasn't told that newly invented LEGO machines were a part of the process, but as long as the states goals were achieved, it doesn't matter much after the fact.
  • BrickDancerBrickDancer Dunes of TatooineMember Posts: 3,639
    I wonder if the company is able to patent the Lego-built machine/contraption?
  • cody6268cody6268 Member Posts: 298

    I wonder if the company is able to patent the Lego-built machine/contraption?

    Who knows, with the money involved, Lego might want licensing, and a chunk of the $600,000.

    Personally, the mechanism looks pretty simple, and isn't worth the $600,000.

    Maybe $60 worth of parts, but that's just about it.

    Does this guy even have an engineering degree?

  • BastaBasta Australia Member Posts: 1,259
    The 600k was for the entire job (not the device), the reason they got the contract was that the Lego device enabled them to do it quicker. Obviously if they were going to go through 1000's of tapes with a cloth in hand and manually wind and wipe each tape the cost would have been higher, as the labour involved would have been huge.

    It's obviously cool being that it is made of Lego, but they could have just as easily used something else. An old tape drive or reel to reel etc could have been modified pretty simply to do the same thing and would probably cost less and be more reliable. I'm also a little surprised that something is not already available to clean water damaged tapes.

  • piratemania7piratemania7 New EnglandMember Posts: 2,146
    That's truly amazing. Love the quote at the end.
  • BuzzsawBuzzsaw UKMember Posts: 79
    http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21929311.500-wiped-out-the-race-to-save-our-video-heritage.html
    Makes mention of the fact that most data is stored on media that A. only lasts 20years or so, B. almost no one has the right equipment to play it, and C. if its digital, who has the software to read it?
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