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Back to the Future Cuusoo Set

1568101115

Comments

  • CM4SCM4S United StatesMember Posts: 1,302
    Why not use the LXF I posted above?
  • Brick_ObsessionBrick_Obsession in a "Brick" house - Calgary, AlbertaMember Posts: 654
    I want to know who the morons are that are spending so much on this item. You do know that you can get 3 of them for the price that you are bidding right now in the very near future.

    Probably the same people who will be complaining in a couple of months that items cost so much on Ebay.

    Unbelievable!
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,822
    edited July 2013

    I hit up fbtb.net for news (they sometimes seem ahead of brickset on news items) but I have to restrain myself from reading reviews. Obviously they're LEGO fans, but the general negativity and nitpickiness of their reviews makes me wonder...

    If the price of $35 is accurate, and it translates into $50 canadian, I will pick it up. I love Back to the Future, it's a fun looking set even if it's not perfect (I would like some kind of transparent windshield), and it's a good conversation piece. I have a soft spot for BTTFIII; won't be surprised if I leave it in "western" mode.

    What version of the Time Machine is your favorite? Much as I love "Where we're going, we don't need roads," the look of part II's fusion reactor is my least favorite. Still cool, but I like the slickness of the original and I love the steampunk vibe of III.

    Normally, I like FBTB's nitpicky reviews, to a certain extent, even if they're really critical of of sets I like. I like sites that can offer a unique perspective of sets. FBTB's unique perspective is that it is a community focused on licensed themes. That means that moreso than any other site, "accuracy to the source material" is the value they most desire in a set. It's the same reason I like reading reviews on BIONICLE fansites like BZPower. A community with a unique set of interests is a community with a unique set of design values, even if they might be a little inexperienced with sets and parts outside their bubble of knowledge. And that means you might get a little more insight at a more specialized site than you would at a general AFOL site.

    With that said, this is part of the reason the FBTB review of this set disappointed me so greatly. It reads not as a detailed analysis like the Brickset or Eurobricks reviews, but as an amateurish rant about how the LEGO Group did everything wrong in every way that matters, with some of the only positive notes being about the box and minifigures. There are no images or links to images of the original model (the closest they have is a link to the hood slope it uses, which we're apparently supposed to take for granted as a superior solution without seeing it on the model itself). There are no images or links to images of the movie props. There are just pics of the set from various angles (which aren't even very good photos), each followed by a paragraph ranting about how awful the model is.

    Even the paragraph about the printed elements, one of the few positive opinions in the piece, finishes with "Don’t get me wrong though, it’s still a terrible model," as if the reviewer was worried he'd lose face if he said even a single good thing about the set. Simply juvenile, and far less than I've come to expect of FBTB. If I hadn't read their very nice review of the Republic Gunship earlier this week, I'd be questioning right now if it was even worth checking there for reviews any longer.

    Now, perhaps I was a bit spoiled by the Eurobricks review by Rufus. That had all the detail I've come to expect of an FBTB review, and then some. It analyzed the presentation, the parts, the minifigures, the building experience, and the final model in amazing detail, with plenty of side-by-side comparisons between the original proposal and the finished product. It's what moved this set from "quite nice design I might pick up" to "brilliant design and a must-have" in my mind. There's not a single angle from which I can say I truly prefer the original proposal to the final model. The redesign really demonstrates Steen Sig Andersen's decades of experience and expertise. The Brickset review also was of good quality, though it understandably lacked these side-by-side comparisons. At least the Brickset review had the good sense to include a picture of the original proposal and the car it's based on rather than just assuming the pop-cultural expertise of the reader.
    Brinstar85caperberrymountebankbassbisonleemcg
  • SchwallexSchwallex Member Posts: 121
    edited July 2013

    ^ Don't forget that the US price doesn't include sales tax.

    The German price without sales tax is still €33.61, or $44. That's still 25% more than the US price without sales tax (not to mention that the sales tax in the US is quite typically five to nine percent, nowhere near twenty-five). To make up for the difference in price to Germany, you'd have to pay a sales tax of 48% in the US.

    And remember that the set is at the very least packaged, if not produced, right next to Germany. Then it's shipped ten thousand miles to be sold at a hefty discount. Yay for emerging markets, sucks to be in the main one.
  • LegofanscottLegofanscott Member Posts: 622
    after looking at the

    ^ the instruction booklet for the Beetle had 'prototype' models of them at the back.

    Having seen it in the booklet, it looks rather outdated compared to today's model's

    The one that LFT posted pictures of a few pages back is the best version ive seen so far.

    It'll be a real shame if they don't do a large scale version.

  • PaperballparkPaperballpark UK / KLMember Posts: 3,482
    ^ The FBTB review is (I think) the first time I've read an article on that site.

    I won't be reading another.
    pillpodAdzbadboy
  • Brinstar85Brinstar85 Member Posts: 42
    To be fair to FBTB, I do like the fact that they have a critical eye, I just think that they push that criticism too far on some occasions. As much as I enjoy the Eurobricks reviews they are almost always positive. I really enjoyed the detailed pictorial review of the Delorean but I'm from convinced that it is worth a 9/10. Still it's all subjective and I've enjoyed reading the different opinions of the new set.
  • caperberrycaperberry LondonMember Posts: 2,226
    Aanchir said:



    ... the FBTB review of this set disappointed me so greatly. It reads not as a detailed analysis like the Brickset or Eurobricks reviews, but as an amateurish rant about how the LEGO Group did everything wrong in every way that matters, with some of the only positive notes being about the box and minifigures. There are no images or links to images of the original model (the closest they have is a link to the hood slope it uses, which we're apparently supposed to take for granted as a superior solution without seeing it on the model itself). There are no images or links to images of the movie props. There are just pics of the set from various angles (which aren't even very good photos), each followed by a paragraph ranting about how awful the model is...

    Spot on. And why choose someone who already hates the set to do the review? It all felt so lazy and "who cares", it really made me angry.
    Aanchir said:


    Now, perhaps I was a bit spoiled by the Eurobricks review by Rufus...

    I really was stunned by Rufus' review. To be frank, I'm not a fan of EB reviews generally - find them too formulaic and lacking in individuality on the whole - but Rufus is my favourite EB writer (well, since @SilentMode stopped posting reviews there anyway!) and Rufus pulled all the stops out with this one. Weeks of dedicated work went into it, and it shows. Brilliant idea to recreate the CUUSOO version as part of the research. Makes his opinion so much more valid than Ace's.
  • TncatsfanTncatsfan Member Posts: 92
    it's on US [email protected], just not open to buying yet.

    http://shop.lego.com/en-US/Cuusoo-ByTheme
    Plelltrickydicky0880jasor
  • prof1515prof1515 EarthMember Posts: 1,561
    I still don't get why people hate the hood. Lego doesn't produce a slope at the angle that would replicate the one of the DeLorean. The hood of the actual car has a very shallow slope to it, so much so that it's closer to flat than it is the degree of the most acute angled piece that Lego produces. So while I think both look ugly, the Lego-produced set is far superior to that clunky model that was on Cuusoo.
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    ^ In that case, it might well call for a new hood piece. Lots of cars have similar hoods, if they did a 1x wide part, they could put 7 of them in the set, make a ton of them, then find another use for that part for a bunch of other cars.

    If they ever do a line of sports cars like the Ford Mustang, they'll need such a part.
  • SchwallexSchwallex Member Posts: 121
    ^ and ^^, you do realize we have hinges, right? We can actually build a smooth hood at absolutely any angle we wish, with the parts we have, 6-wide, 8-wide, 7-wide, x-wide on the one side, y-wide on the other.
  • LegofanscottLegofanscott Member Posts: 622
    edited July 2013
    Schwallex said:

    ^ and ^^, you do realize we have hinges, right? We can actually build a smooth hood at absolutely any angle we wish, with the parts we have, 6-wide, 8-wide, 7-wide, x-wide on the one side, y-wide on the other.

    But why should we have to do it when lego couldve done it for us :D

    Is it really worth the trouble modding something so small?

    Id couldnt remember what the original cuusoo looked like but after seeing it side by side, the official version is far better looking.

  • BRCBRC Member Posts: 125
    Can't get both figures in? Doesn't look like a DeLorean, no hoverboard like the Cuusoo? This set doesn't seem to meet Lego's usual high standards.
  • BRCBRC Member Posts: 125
    edited July 2013
    jay359 said:
    What? $69.99!?!? As an example, you could buy the Spider-Man Daily Bugle Showdown 76005 for less than that, bit pricey.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 18,016
    prof1515 said:

    I still don't get why people hate the hood. Lego doesn't produce a slope at the angle that would replicate the one of the DeLorean. The hood of the actual car has a very shallow slope to it, so much so that it's closer to flat than it is the degree of the most acute angled piece that Lego produces. So while I think both look ugly, the Lego-produced set is far superior to that clunky model that was on Cuusoo.

    Many things in legoworld are not quite right or exaggerated to make them (i) be practical from a build perspective and (ii) be recognizable.

    A sloped hood would look better than a flat one and definitely better than a stepped one. It doesn't matter that the angle might be 10 degrees off, exaggeration of the slope would not really be a big deal in comparison to the bad detail of the sides of the windscreen, the lack of space for minifigures, etc.
  • caperberrycaperberry LondonMember Posts: 2,226
    CCC said:


    It doesn't matter that the angle might be 10 degrees off, exaggeration of the slope would not really be a big deal in comparison to the bad detail of the sides of the windscreen, the lack of space for minifigures, etc.

    I think it would matter. There's a huge visual difference between using part 4515 or say 30363 which is approximately 8 degrees steeper and the angle rises along 3 studs instead of 6.

    So I think it would be a big deal. For AFOLs that is :O) - I suspect the majority non-AFOL BttF fans will be fine with the approximation. AFOLs would be moaning about the hood angle instead of the use of stepping if Steen went with a slope. Fact is at this scale, serious compromises had to be made and feathers were gonna be ruffled whatever Steen chose to do. I have no doubt he looked into all major options.

    Having now built the set I appreciate just what a tight space he needed to come up with solutions within. And clearly TLG relaxed the usual rules on stability to help him. That said, the final windscreen and lack of fig space are indeed disappointing.

    The rear? I freaking love it. I'm displaying the set at a 3/4 view from rear with a gull wing open and Doc perched there on his way out of the vehicle :O)
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 18,016


    The rear? I freaking love it. I'm displaying the set at a 3/4 view from rear with a gull wing open and Doc perched there on his way out of the vehicle :O)

    On his way out? Or perched on the side try to work out how to get in!
  • caperberrycaperberry LondonMember Posts: 2,226
    CCC said:


    The rear? I freaking love it. I'm displaying the set at a 3/4 view from rear with a gull wing open and Doc perched there on his way out of the vehicle :O)

    On his way out? Or perched on the side try to work out how to get in!
    Lolz. To see his cute little face. But just tried it the other way and the nuclear hazard sign looks pretty sweet.

    The ironic thing is, it LOOKS like there's a lot of space in there! Now going to try replacing the cheese slope so he can half-sit on the passenger seat.

    My, the playability ;O)
  • prof1515prof1515 EarthMember Posts: 1,561
    CCC said:

    Many things in legoworld are not quite right or exaggerated to make them (i) be practical from a build perspective and (ii) be recognizable.

    That's just it. Complaining about the step instead of slope is a case of something "not quite right" to make it both practical and recognizable. The stepped look makes the profile of the model far more accurate in shape than that overly-steep slope. Lego's model looks more like the DeLorean than the original Cuusoo model because it retains a more accurate profile even if it uses steps instead of a continuous slope. View both models merely as a silhouette and Lego's is identifiable. The original Cuusoo one looks nothing like a DeLorean; it's unrecognizable as such.

    @LegoFanTexas, I'd agree that a new mold is the best option and would be useful in many other applications. However, it seems that Lego's intention with Cuusoo was creativity via existing parts rather than the normal design requirements of typical lines and themes (ie, new molds and R&D from scratch).

  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,096
    ^ So in other words the final model is not complete crap. Just an example of the limitiations of Lego building bricks within a price point.

    If you look at many of the inexpensive Creator car models they all have similar stepped hoods. I think the problem is the expectations of hard-core Lego collectors. Like I said before, if you want a realistic model then look at other collectables.
  • prof1515prof1515 EarthMember Posts: 1,561
    mathew said:

    ^ So in other words the final model is not complete crap. Just an example of the limitiations of Lego building bricks within a price point.

    Well, I think it's crap but that's not the designer's fault. Rather, the reason it looks like crap is the limitations of Lego when trying to create that vehicle in mini-figure scale. Like you said, if you want completely accurate, try a different kind of collectible like a die-cast model instead.

  • XefanXefan Member Posts: 1,149
    To be fair I've felt the Cuusoo sets to date aren't that great value for money but I've put this down to them being rather more limited run due to their more experimental nature in the marketplace.

    But despite this I think they probably do result in higher profit per set for TLG, so spending a little more to make it bigger to build a proper hood shouldn't have broken the bank.
  • PaperballparkPaperballpark UK / KLMember Posts: 3,482
    @caperberry given that they had 10 stories in which to reach terminal velocity, I'd take a guess that they probably did get to 88mph.

    Unfortunately in this case, it seems they forgot to turn the thing on.
  • LegoboyLegoboy 100km furtherMember Posts: 8,718

    Doc and Marty just had an exciting journey down ten storeys with several discussions with brick walls along the way. Suffice to say they didn't reach 88mph and escape the ground.

    The lightning strike isn't due 'til next Saturday night. No wonder it didn't work.
    indigobox
  • LostInTranslationLostInTranslation UKMember Posts: 5,529
    @caperberry: I'm so very sorry to hear of this dramatic turn of events (though I have had a good giggle imagining the scene).

    I was however wondering why you didn't use your Kryptonian powers to swoop in and snatch it mid-flight, nanoseconds before impact. Went to pieces (no pun intended ;-)) in a crisis, did you?
    jasor
  • XefanXefan Member Posts: 1,149
    I'm intrigued, were there any onlookers wondering what on earth was going on during this event caperberry?
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 18,016
    prof1515 said:

    CCC said:

    Many things in legoworld are not quite right or exaggerated to make them (i) be practical from a build perspective and (ii) be recognizable.

    That's just it. Complaining about the step instead of slope is a case of something "not quite right" to make it both practical and recognizable. The stepped look makes the profile of the model far more accurate in shape than that overly-steep slope.

    Yes, they have to do something, and are either going to please one camp that want the hood to have the right angle but stepped or another camp that want the hood to be uniform gradient but sloped, or none.

  • caperberrycaperberry LondonMember Posts: 2,226
    edited July 2013
    Thanks for the comments guys I knew I could rely on you in a moment of crisis, unlike Jor-El who I think was doing his hair at the time. You must be right @Paperballpark Marty and the Doc understandably didn't think to turn the flux capacitor on, but they were still smiling when I found them so the shock did not so much as rotate their heads.

    I made the task of checking the inventory nicer by doing it in the garden - took the pieces downstairs in the traditional manner this time though. @Xefan I doubt anyone saw the drama but neighbours certainly asked what I was doing sorting LEGO in the garden. And cooed at the coolness of the model (as seen on the instructions cover).

    I was lucky, my first search located all but 5 pieces (which were just small black and bley common elements). The parts that met the 10 floors of brick will have to go but again nothing rare. The only sadness is the flux capacitor has 2 small scratches, so again really I was lucky. I'll now join the campaign to have TLG reprint this part with the correct spelling ;O)

    Don't try this at home, kids. Think once, think twice, think don't throw £35 of kit off a 10th floor balcony.

    @LostInTranslation you so intended the pun :O)
    LostInTranslationindigobox
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    Perhaps it was pointing backwards when it broke 88mph, that wouldn't have worked either, because the emitter on the top of the roof needs to be pointing forward to project a wormhole in front of the car to allow time travel.

    That is, of course, why the car has to be going 88mph, that is the speed required to get the car through the wormhole before it collapses, since it is only open for a fraction of a second.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 18,016
    edited July 2013
    Check the box. Does it say "car does not fly" in the same way lego boats say "boat does not float"? If it doesn't, then you may have a legal case. :-)
    caperberry
  • LostInTranslationLostInTranslation UKMember Posts: 5,529
    edited July 2013
    ^ lol "Not an actual time machine" :-)
    Otherwise you could send Lego Marty and Doc back to stop you from doing it.
  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    edited July 2013

    Perhaps it was pointing backwards when it broke 88mph, that wouldn't have worked either, because the emitter on the top of the roof needs to be pointing forward to project a wormhole in front of the car to allow time travel.

    That is, of course, why the car has to be going 88mph, that is the speed required to get the car through the wormhole before it collapses, since it is only open for a fraction of a second.

    No, this would make a lot of sense, as the model looks 88x better when viewed from the rear.

    I'm curious though, would people have paid $10 more if they had made it one stud wider and used enough bricks to shore up the shortcomings, or is the current price point at the ceiling of what most people would be willing to pay?
  • caperberrycaperberry LondonMember Posts: 2,226
    My Marty & Doc figs did in fact turn up from the future just now, but only to confirm @Legoboy's prediction was true. (About the lightning, not the date that BttF would be on shelves.)
  • prof1515prof1515 EarthMember Posts: 1,561
    CCC said:

    Check the box. Does it say "car does not fly" in the same way lego boats say "boat does not float"? If it doesn't, then you may have a legal case. :-)

    It flies. It just doesn't land that well. :-D

    TheLoneTensorOjik
  • PaperballparkPaperballpark UK / KLMember Posts: 3,482
    To be fair, even if it had worked and the model had been transported back in time, the only difference is that it would have hit the ground in a different year...
    caperberry
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 18,016
    edited July 2013
    ^ And landed "safely" in the common white dog poo of 1976.
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    tensor said:

    No, this would make a lot of sense, as the model looks 88x better when viewed from the rear.

    I'm curious though, would people have paid $10 more if they had made it one stud wider and used enough bricks to shore up the shortcomings, or is the current price point at the ceiling of what most people would be willing to pay?

    I'm not a good person to ask, since I'm not price sensitive, I'm value sensitive.

    Had it been a 1,500 part model and they priced it at $200, I'd have complained about the price/part ratio. :)

    Had they priced it at $150 and it had 1,500 parts, I would have been happy.

    Keep in mind, I would gladly pay $600 for a 6,000 part UCS AT-AT, so never ask me if $35 or $45 is the "right" price point for anything. :)
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    prof1515 said:

    It flies. It just doesn't land that well. :-D

    He must not have had it in the BTTF II flying mode. The BTTF III rail mode doesn't fly worth a darn. :)
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,096
    tensor said:

    Perhaps it was pointing backwards when it broke 88mph, that wouldn't have worked either, because the emitter on the top of the roof needs to be pointing forward to project a wormhole in front of the car to allow time travel.

    That is, of course, why the car has to be going 88mph, that is the speed required to get the car through the wormhole before it collapses, since it is only open for a fraction of a second.

    No, this would make a lot of sense, as the model looks 88x better when viewed from the rear.

    I'm curious though, would people have paid $10 more if they had made it one stud wider and used enough bricks to shore up the shortcomings, or is the current price point at the ceiling of what most people would be willing to pay?
    Or use stickers instead of printed bricks.
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,822

    ^ In that case, it might well call for a new hood piece. Lots of cars have similar hoods, if they did a 1x wide part, they could put 7 of them in the set, make a ton of them, then find another use for that part for a bunch of other cars.

    If they ever do a line of sports cars like the Ford Mustang, they'll need such a part.

    Not possible with Cuusoo, and furthermore, there already ARE hood pieces that have less of an incline: 52031 and 45677. The issue is that they're too small. 13731 is another shallow angle, and was used as a hood slope in Monster Fighters, but it has the opposite problem: it's too long.

    Besides, generally, if you want a detailed sculpture of a real car, you typically use smaller, less specialized parts to "sculpt" the vehicle rather than simply introducing new and specialized elements. Perhaps Mega Bloks can get away for introducing new body panel elements for any car set they base on a real car, but the LEGO Group holds themselves to a higher standard. So I think that it's unlikely such an issue could ever come up. For car models not based directly on real cars, the LEGO Group can use one of the existing shallow slope elements I linked above, because they will be fully at liberty to decide the scale and shape of the model.
    Schwallex said:

    ^ and ^^, you do realize we have hinges, right? We can actually build a smooth hood at absolutely any angle we wish, with the parts we have, 6-wide, 8-wide, 7-wide, x-wide on the one side, y-wide on the other.

    Not that easy. A hinged tile for the hood would leave an angled gap on the sides that would need to be filled or covered, and there are no slope or wedge plates that are the right angle for the task. If there were, you might as well just use those for the hood. I'd love to see a model, either physically or on LDD, that used this sort of technique, but frankly I can't think of any way you'd cover or fill that gap except with staggered tiles, which would themselves still leave a slight gap towards the front of the angled tile.

    Furthermore, mounting the roof supports would be a challenge unless you left room for connection points. I'm not going to lie, the straight front-to-back alignment of the roof supports on the original Cuusoo proposal was not a satisfactory solution. From a direct front view, it makes the vehicle look like a box rather than having the angled side windows that make it so distinctive. Mounting the windows on jumper plates as the final model does is a much more agreeable solution because it allows them to rotate along a vertical axis.
  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    edited July 2013
    Aanchir said:

    Not possible with Cuusoo

    Why is that not possible?
    Aanchir said:

    Schwallex said:

    ^ and ^^, you do realize we have hinges, right? We can actually build a smooth hood at absolutely any angle we wish, with the parts we have, 6-wide, 8-wide, 7-wide, x-wide on the one side, y-wide on the other.

    Not that easy. A hinged tile for the hood would leave an angled gap on the sides that would need to be filled or covered, and there are no slope or wedge plates that are the right angle for the task.
    I'd rather have a slightly gapped side than a stepped hood, shrug.

  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,096
    Another problem with the criticisms is that they are coming from people who probably don't MOC on a regular basis. It ain't easy to design a vehicle. Especially if trying to stick with minifig scale. And keeping it at a specific price point.
  • PaperballparkPaperballpark UK / KLMember Posts: 3,482
    tensor said:

    Why is that not possible?

    Because the Cuusoo team have specifically stated that models requiring new molds are very unlikely to get made. So basically the design team is limited to the current parts list.
  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    edited July 2013

    tensor said:

    Why is that not possible?

    Because the Cuusoo team have specifically stated that models requiring new molds are very unlikely to get made. So basically the design team is limited to the current parts list.
    True, but unlikely and not possible are two different terms.
    mathew said:

    Another problem with the criticisms is that they are coming from people who probably don't MOC on a regular basis. It ain't easy to design a vehicle. Especially if trying to stick with minifig scale. And keeping it at a specific price point.

    I MOC, and I criticized this. Did I create a paradox? Great Scott!

  • PaperballparkPaperballpark UK / KLMember Posts: 3,482
    tensor said:

    True, but unlikely and not possible are two different terms.

    Indeed. Although it is possible for me to win the lottery were I to buy a ticket, it is very unlikely.
  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    edited July 2013
    Exaggeration aside, the point is, whether or not a project was submitted with a new part, if the design team, as they were working through the modeling, came up with an ROI analysis that determined a new mold would be fiduciarily responsible, and sold it as such to the decision makers, a new mold would get done.
    jasor
  • AdzbadboyAdzbadboy London, UKMember Posts: 2,625
    Lego are now aware of the spelling error on the Flux Capacitor and are working out a suitable solution:
    https://legocuusoo.uservoice.com/knowledgebase/articles/226962-information-about-the-back-to-the-future-set-flux-
  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    Version 1.0 just went up in value :)
    Ojikvitreolum
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