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Train track up hill?

Hi

I was just wanting to know is it possible to build lego train track with an incline?
Making a city diorama and wanted to have a tunnel for traffic to go under with a train bridge crossing over the top.
Is this possible just ordered a lot of he train sets for lego direct.
Thanks
Paul

Comments

  • BeardedCastleGuyBeardedCastleGuy Member Posts: 127
    Yes it is possible take a look at http://www.flickr.com/photos/toomuchdew/7411809042/in/set-72157630224897652/
    Your grade (percentage of incline) is not going to be very steep though, unless you do a cog railway (no examples handy, sorry). I suspect you are not going to go beyond 'real life' railway grades.
  • drdavewatforddrdavewatford Hertfordshire, UKAdministrator Posts: 6,534
    ^ Agreed - standard trains can't handle much of an incline at all. I've actually experimented with inclined track on my own layout, and I blogged about it at the URL below if you want to see how I fared...

    http://gimmelego.blogspot.co.uk/2011/08/change-of-plan.html

    In summary, you need a lot of space in order to raise the track.....
  • Gavin83Gavin83 Member Posts: 251
    In regards to your blog are you able to use a steeper incline with the 9V or 12V track over the current system?
  • drdavewatforddrdavewatford Hertfordshire, UKAdministrator Posts: 6,534
    Gavin83 said:

    In regards to your blog are you able to use a steeper incline with the 9V or 12V track over the current system?

    Good question. I've only tried PF motors and non-electrified track, so not sure if 9V or 12V would perform any better.

  • oldtodd33oldtodd33 Denver 4800 miles to BillundMember Posts: 2,528
    ^ I have tried it with 9v power. I used the 1 plate per section and 1 brick per section if I remember correctly. The test subject was a standard Maersk train with 2 containers and four containers with two powered engines. The 1 brick per section was very hard on the train at best so I went with what everyone suggested and did one plate per section. The best way was two Maersk engines each with a 9v motor. That train configuration had two cars and four containers but was slow to get up the hill. As far as a 12v system goes, I think it would do better since it uses rubber traction bands and serrated track to help it move. I might also say that I did try the PF system on the 9v track and the motor would tend to stall half way up and the cars tended to separate from the engine. The newer style magnets just aren't as strong as the old style being that they are encased in plastic. Here is a youtube video of a 12v system using an incline. This isn't my video.
  • Si_UKNZSi_UKNZ NZMember Posts: 4,179
    I got good results with the serrated track, mind you I was using a super light tram, so the results aren't comparable.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,113
    edited March 2013
    This is one area where duplo outperforms lego. We have two of this set ...

    image

    and occasionally put all four inclines one after the other. The duplo train with a few trucks filled with cargo can easily get up a vertical height of about 40-50cm in a run of 2m or so on freshly charged batteries. It is a shame the lego versions cannot pull as much on an incline.
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