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Off Topic Gaming Consoles

This discussion was created from comments split from: How Legal is it to Use Amazon as a Supplier.
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  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    ^ All I can say about our government is that they don't seem to have the average person's interest in mind very often.

    The whole "do you own something" nonsense is a perfect example. Just today I was trying to reinstall Adobe Acrobat 9 Standard onto my wife's notebook, I replaced her old notebook with a new one, I had formatted the old one and forgotten that I had to click on "deactivate" in Acrobat before doing so.

    So I ended up on a 30 minute phone call with Adobe because it wouldn't activate on the new notebook, they were like, "well, you can only use this on 3 computers", and I was like, "that is what I'm doing, this is a new computer, the old one was reformatted and sold", and they were like, "well, we don't trust you, you should have deactivated the old machine", and I'm like, "how the heck am I supposed to know or remember to do that 3 years after installing it?"

    And they didn't really care. They did offer to sell me an upgrade to the newest version.

    Very annoying... If I buy something, I shouldn't have this much trouble using it.
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    Another stupid example...

    We have two PS3 systems in our house, one in the family room and one in the kids game room. They are mostly here as Blu-Ray players, but the kids do have some games on them that they play. I tried buying a digital copy of a movie once, Finding Nemo. I bought it via the Sony Playstation Network. That is fine, except they no longer sell it for some reason, so I can't redownload it if I delete it from my PS3 and I have no way to copy it to my second PS3 (both are signed in using the same PSN ID).

    Some games only work properly on one of the two consoles, and I am reading that the upcoming next-gen consoles will lock games to the specific console they are "activated on".

    This is stupid, when I was a kid, I had a NES, then a SNES, I would take game cartridges over to a friend's house, he would bring games to mine, we would trade and share games...

    This locking activating nonsense needs to go. Grr...
    yys4u
  • BastaBasta Australia Member Posts: 1,259
    edited February 2013
    @LegoFanTexas Your fist problem was you bought a PS3 and not an XBOX :P (Ok, XBOX is no good for Blu-Ray) To be honest, if it wasn’t a cheap way to get a Blue-Ray player for so long I doubt the PS3 would have been nearly as popular as it is. It was a major deciding factor for everyone I know who owns one, but all my hard-core gamer friends (The ones who spend lots on gaming) all rock XBOX’s.

    Secondly Sony need to turn a profit any way they can these days, but I think they are stuck in the stone ages when it comes to digital rights etc. They have always been a little too keen on the security side of things and they tend to shoot themselves in the foot, alienating the end user in the name of copyright protection.
    Pitfall69
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    ^ Apple got rid of DRM on music in 2009 on iTunes, and they keep selling millions of tracks.

    Truth is, most people are honest, give them a fair price and they'll pay for stuff.

    I'll admit in my youth I downloaded movies and games, but these days, there are enough deals to be had, I'd rather just buy legal copies. It takes less time, it is easier, and it is the honest way to do it. What annoys me is that the legal copies have more restrictions than the illegal copies do.

    That is just nuts.
    wagnerml2
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,234
    We don't mean to turn this into something other than the OT, but in a way this all ties into the OT in some way :)
    Redbullgivesuwind
  • y2joshy2josh Member Posts: 2,002

    Some games only work properly on one of the two consoles, and I am reading that the upcoming next-gen consoles will lock games to the specific console they are "activated on".

    This is stupid, when I was a kid, I had a NES, then a SNES, I would take game cartridges over to a friend's house, he would bring games to mine, we would trade and share games...

    This locking activating nonsense needs to go. Grr...

    The PS4 was revealed on Wednesday and, though it was met with the expected mixed sentiment, Sony mentioned nothing about locking retail games to specific consoles... which I think would have been important to announce if they really intend to go forward with that.

    I'll be pretty interested to see where the next-gen goes, though. This is the first time that there's such a marginal gap between what has been shown and what we already have. The Wii U is floundering pretty badly and I don't think the PS4 will perform very well, either. I think Microsoft will follow a similar path if they don't allow some kind of carry-over from the current generation, but I suppose we'll have a clearer picture come November.

    LEGO, of course, is in no danger of being limited by any kind of digital distribution hurdles, and you'll never be able to completely stop someone from selling it if they really want to, but I suppose TLG could effectively limit your avenues, though I suspect the potential downside may be less than worth the effort.
  • Pacific493Pacific493 Member Posts: 379

    ^ All I can say about our government is that they don't seem to have the average person's interest in mind very often.

    The whole "do you own something" nonsense is a perfect example. Just today I was trying to reinstall Adobe Acrobat 9 Standard onto my wife's notebook, I replaced her old notebook with a new one, I had formatted the old one and forgotten that I had to click on "deactivate" in Acrobat before doing so.

    So I ended up on a 30 minute phone call with Adobe because it wouldn't activate on the new notebook, they were like, "well, you can only use this on 3 computers", and I was like, "that is what I'm doing, this is a new computer, the old one was reformatted and sold", and they were like, "well, we don't trust you, you should have deactivated the old machine", and I'm like, "how the heck am I supposed to know or remember to do that 3 years after installing it?"

    And they didn't really care. They did offer to sell me an upgrade to the newest version.

    Very annoying... If I buy something, I shouldn't have this much trouble using it.

    That actually has nothing to do with the government...that's purely a matter of a private contract. What you probably didn't realize when you "bought" that software was that you weren't actually buying the software...you were just buying a license to use software that remains owned by Adobe.
  • Pacific493Pacific493 Member Posts: 379

    Another stupid example...

    We have two PS3 systems in our house, one in the family room and one in the kids game room. They are mostly here as Blu-Ray players, but the kids do have some games on them that they play. I tried buying a digital copy of a movie once, Finding Nemo. I bought it via the Sony Playstation Network. That is fine, except they no longer sell it for some reason, so I can't redownload it if I delete it from my PS3 and I have no way to copy it to my second PS3 (both are signed in using the same PSN ID).

    Some games only work properly on one of the two consoles, and I am reading that the upcoming next-gen consoles will lock games to the specific console they are "activated on".

    This is stupid, when I was a kid, I had a NES, then a SNES, I would take game cartridges over to a friend's house, he would bring games to mine, we would trade and share games...

    This locking activating nonsense needs to go. Grr...

    What really needs to go are all of the f***** software updates. It always seems like I could step away from my PS3 for 10 minutes and have to install a software update to continue using it when I come back. I have no idea why they can't just come up with a stable version of their software and stick with it, rather than constantly having to revise the software and force me to waste my time installing it in order to keep using the PS3.

  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409

    That actually has nothing to do with the government...that's purely a matter of a private contract. What you probably didn't realize when you "bought" that software was that you weren't actually buying the software...you were just buying a license to use software that remains owned by Adobe.

    Where the government needs to step in is to say that such "licences" are not valid. If you buy the right to use the software, then you get it, for any computer you own, forever, without having to "ask permission" every 5 seconds.

    If I own a desktop and a notebook, I should be able to use my program on both of them.

    Further, I should be able to resell this right anytime I want, to anyone I want, so long as I don't keep a copy myself.

    I get the whole copy thing, they have to sell copies to pay the bills, but for crying out loud, if I can resell a book, which is nothing more than "bytes of data", I should be able to resell software. The only reason why they don't have restrictions on a physical book is that there is no reasonable way to have them. This is why eBooks can't be resold, because it is easy to do so.
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409

    What really needs to go are all of the f***** software updates. It always seems like I could step away from my PS3 for 10 minutes and have to install a software update to continue using it when I come back. I have no idea why they can't just come up with a stable version of their software and stick with it, rather than constantly having to revise the software and force me to waste my time installing it in order to keep using the PS3.

    Yes, this "always on internet" has caused a mess of sloppy programming.

    My PS2 never need an update. My SNES never needed one. Heck, up until recently, my cell phones never needed one, I had cell phones for 15 years before my first one (a Droid 1) said "time to update, I'll need 20 minutes".

    Bleah!

    Now get off my lawn! :)
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    Windows is just as bad... Even Windows 3.1, for all its faults, more or less was unchanged for a long time. DOS 3.3, 5.0, etc. all worked well. 4 had a very minor update, but Windows 7 seems to need 30 patches every month, my anti-virus updates every few hours, Steam has game updates every day, the PS3 does indeed seem to update every week, my son's brand new Wii U had to update for an hour, right out of the box, brand new this Christmas.

    Sheesh, the thing isn't even a month old and it needs a 5GB download? That tells me it was rushed out the door, it should be solid at release.

    :)
  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    edited February 2013

    My PS2 never need an update.

    I think if you remember a little harder, you'll realize that every couple months when you bought a new game, that game would require you to install an update which, pre-internet, was how updates were delivered, i.e. piggybacked on newer game discs.

    One other fair point is that the complexity of items back then and items today are about 10x more? 100x? So much so that things back in the day had much less risk of having bugs/needing updates. That said, QA for a lot of things today sucks, and yes, many simply rely on the fact that "hey, we can push out an update anytime."

    Holy crap I'm off-topic. Sorry.

    On-topic, I believe it's been said best already, if you promote the ITEM you're selling, there's nothing wrong. If you promote the BRAND to sell your item, you're risking unwanted attention.
  • y2joshy2josh Member Posts: 2,002
    edited February 2013
    tensor said:

    My PS2 never need an update.

    I think if you remember a little harder, you'll realize that every couple months when you bought a new game, that game would require you to install an update which, pre-internet, was how updates were delivered, i.e. piggybacked on newer game discs.
    Not that this is on topic at all (and not that this thread has stayed on topic, anyway), but the PS2 is 100% incapable of having its firmware updated, either via the Internet or by a patch on a disc.

    What you may be thinking of is the fact that you had to frequently update the DVD drivers, but that would only occur if you were playing a newer movie in your PS2... which you shouldn't have been playing DVDs in to begin with, because it wasn't really designed for that, even if it was technically capable.

    And even then, you couldn't REALLY update your system, so much as save the new files onto a memory card, because the PS2 itself wasn't designed to be updateable.
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    y2josh said:

    Not that this is on topic at all (and not that this thread has stayed on topic, anyway), but the PS2 is 100% incapable of having its firmware updated, either via the Internet or by a patch on a disc.

    Ahh, who needs on-topic? :)

    BTW, the PS1 and PS2 were true simple game systems, you put a disc in and boot them up, they played, period. If a game was released with bugs, not much could be done other than a recall, so developers had to get them right the first time.

    BTW, just for fun...

    The R3000 CPU in the PS1 was 33mhz and had 110,000 transistors

    The Emotion Engine CPU in the PS2 was 294 mhz and had 10.5 million transistors

    The Cell CPU in the PS3 is 3.2 ghz (3,200 mhz) and has 234 million transistors

    By comparison, the newest Intel Core i7 3970X CPU has 2.3 billion transistors and the newest GTX Titan graphics card has a single chip GPU with 7.1 billion transistors on it.

    The PS3 is actually old-school now. :) The fact that it runs at 3.2 ghz actually means little, the first Pentium 4 hit 3.06 ghz in 2002, and it was actually a terrible CPU, being beaten by AMD Athlon CPUs running at half that speed back in the day. (anyone remember Thoroughbred running at 1.8 ghz that would often put in numbers 50% better than P4 running at 3 ghz?)
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    Ok, ok, don't kill me... but just for fun... Anyone remember the Apple II? You know, the computer that came out in 1977?

    The SNES actually has a slightly updated version of the same CPU that is in the Apple II. It is a good 16-bit CPU, but running WAY too slowly at 3.58 mhz. The SNES would have been amazing had they just run the darn thing at 8mhz. Perhaps yields early on were too low, but it should have done that just fine.

    The SNES also has the same basic CPU that is in the Turbo-Graphics 16, but an updated true 16-bit chip. The TB16, actually has an 8-bit CPU, go figure.

    Sega Genesis had the wonderful Mortorala 68000 CPU, the same as the Mac, wonderful CPU that kicked everything else out of the water, but it was paired with a horrible GPU, it couldn't do colors and couldn't do the heavy graphic tricks of SNES. What it could do was speed, which is why Sonic was born.

    The funny thing... Out of all the CPUs from the 80s, the Intel x86 line is actually NOT the one that should have survived, it was the worst of all the designs in many ways, but here we are with it anyway. :)

    ARM has brought back a lot of the good old design ideas, which is why a 1ghz ARM CPU can do so much on so little power in a cell phone, while Intel can't seem to make a low power CPU to save themselves, because X86 is very old thinking.

    Wait, wasn't this about LEGO?

    ----------

    Back on topic, when will we get CPUs in our LEGO? :) Mindstorm 3 anyone? :)
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,234
    ^Better is not always widely accepted. Remember Betamax?
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    Pitfall69 said:

    ^Better is not always widely accepted. Remember Betamax?

    Yes... :) But Betamax wasn't 2 hours of tape in a normal package, so was it really "better" if you had to change tapes during most movies?

    BTW, something else I just noticed, that I never knew before...

    NES had a 6502 CPU...

    What is amazing is that CPU has only 3,510 transistors... you could make that out of vacuum tubes! (with a big room!)

    Even more amazing?

    Apple I, II, II+, IIe
    Commodore Vic-20 & Pet
    Atari 2600
    NES
    And many more

    All used that CPU

    The one in the Atari 2600 was a shorter pin-out and could only address 4k of memory!

    Finally, the CPU in the SNES? It is a more modern version of the 6502, it was actually able to run all software written for the NES. If Nintendo had wanted to, it would have been very simple to make the SNES completely backward compatible with the older NES with almost no extra work.
  • wagnerml2wagnerml2 Belleville, IllinoisMember Posts: 1,376
    I loved my Apple IIe. The time I wasted on Zork, Wizardy and Ultima was just awesome. I recently broke out my original atari 2600 for my son and it gets waaaaaayyyyy more play than the Xbox. I also have a standup Donkey Kong coin op that is converted to a 60-1 Game and plays all the original pacmen, donkey kong, galagas, etc. My son may not hit the world knowing Dante and Goethe, but he will know the classics!!!
  • BastaBasta Australia Member Posts: 1,259
    LOL LFT, your showing your age, and mine :) I use to build computers for a living back in the mid to late 90s, for a period there AMD out performed Intel and were much better value. These days I'm out of the loop when it comes to hardware, if I had to build a computer now I would be lost as far as what goes with what, luckily I'd have Google to help me.
  • ColoradoBricksColoradoBricks Denver, CO, USAMember Posts: 1,640
    Between 2 stacks of LEGO boxes, I have a Tandy 1000 SX, still working and never got an update :). Now I may need to load one the games on the 5 1/4 floppy before the day is over :)
  • y2joshy2josh Member Posts: 2,002

    The SNES actually has a slightly updated version of the same CPU that is in the Apple II. It is a good 16-bit CPU, but running WAY too slowly at 3.58 mhz. The SNES would have been amazing had they just run the darn thing at 8mhz. Perhaps yields early on were too low, but it should have done that just fine.

    Whoa whoa whoa... WOULD have been? To this day, the SNES remains the greatest video game console ever made and is home to no fewer than five of the five greatest games ever made.
    Brickarmor
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    y2josh said:

    Whoa whoa whoa... WOULD have been? To this day, the SNES remains the greatest video game console ever made and is home to no fewer than five of the five greatest games ever made.

    Yes, yes, what was I thinking? :)

    I agree, the SNES was an amazing system, I spent many, many, many hours playing on that system. NES as well, both were a major part of my childhood. :)
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,234
    WOW!!! We have really gotten off topic. Makes me want to pull out my Commodore 64 and play some Beach Head :)
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    Pitfall69 said:

    WOW!!! We have really gotten off topic. Makes me want to pull out my Commodore 64 and play some Beach Head :)

    :) I still have my Apple IIgs in the garage, safely boxed up. My Apple Imagewrite II color printer (24-pin letter quality!), Apple RGB color monitor, 5.25" and 3.5" floppy drives, and 5 or 6 boxes of great software.

    I pulled it all out about 6 years ago, everything worked perfectly at the time, one of these days I need to set it all back up. The only issue of course is that it would be tons of fun for 3 hours, then what... :)

    BTW, I just looked something else up...

    15 years ago, I owned a Pentium 166 with a 17" CRT flat screen monitor (the flat screen thing was a selling point back then) running at 1024x768, 16MB of RAM, and a 4GB Western Digital hard drive! Still had 3.5" floppy drives and a CD-ROM drive! :) All running Windows 95 OSR2 (remember the OEM only version of that?)!

    Woot! :)

    Today, I have an Intel 4 core CPU running at over 4ghz (yea, overclocked, but it takes 1 mouse click these days to do that), three Dell 30" 2560x1600 LCD monitors, 16GB of ram (1000 times more baby!), a 240GB Intel solid state drive for booting and 6TB of hard drive storage for movies and games. All this runs Windows 7, which is a hundred times more reliable than Windows 95 ever dreamed of being, plug and play is here and works 100% of the time (finally).

    I do have a DVD drive, but I can't recall the last time I used it for anything other than moving Disney Digital copies to iTunes. For removable storage, USB flash drives all the way. $35 these days for 64GB of space!

    The funny thing is, other than my current monitors, my current computer cost less than the one in 1997, not even bothering to adjust for inflation. I'll admit my current monitors are on the extreme end, but give it 5 more years and they won't be.

    My youngest son is about to turn 3 years old. In 15 years he'll turn 18. What will computers be like 15 years from now when he goes to college? If we were on Windows 95 and the above computer in early 1998, what will we have in 2028?

    Computers in our brains?

    I feel old... :) I'll be 52 years old then, sheesh...

    In 1998, we were all still on dial-up. Or most people were, I had a computer business so I had a ISDN line in my house (128K up and down), but most people had 56.6K modems.

    DSL really came out in 2000 for most people, even then it was 1.5meg down at most for most people, 256k up, which was a huge improvement.

    Today, on Verizon FIOS, we have 150meg down, 65meg up. That is 18 megabytes down... 1GB can be downloaded every 56 seconds... With a 56k modem, it would take 50 hours to download 1GB. Now it can be done in 1 minute.

    Today, I pay less month per month for my FIOS connection than my ISDN connection cost in 1998. That is... amazing...

    Back on topic...

    ----------

    If LEGO decreased in price an increased in function the way comptuters do, LEGO would be giving it away, it would build into real objects like cars and rocketships, and perhaps even talk to us. :)

    I'm trying to think about how a physical object like LEGO can change over the next 15 years.

    So I guess to get back to LEGO, what does everything think LEGO will look like 15 years from now?
  • BanditBandit Member Posts: 890


    In 1998, we were all still on dial-up. Or most people were, I had a computer business so I had a ISDN line in my house (128K up and down), but most people had 56.6K modems.

    DSL really came out in 2000 for most people, even then it was 1.5meg down at most for most people, 256k up, which was a huge improvement.

    I had cable broadband in 1997...
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    Bandit said:

    I had cable broadband in 1997...

    No kidding? Where? DSL wasn't even a standard until 1998 and it didn't really get rolled out until 2000 (I'm sure a few people got it before then, but I remember 2000 being the big year of it.

    DOCSIS was approved in 1997, but likewise it wasn't rolled out until 2000 (later in my area, but I'm sure other places had it sooner.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DOCSIS

    In any case, you're lucky to have gotten it that early. I signed up for DSL as soon as I could, I don't recall if it was 99 or 00, but it was as soon as SWBell offered it. :)
  • JP3804JP3804 Member Posts: 332
    You guys missed all the fun.

    Christmas 1975 Pong and a 13 inch black and white tv.

    Now were's my walker? :-)
    wagnerml2
  • sidersddsidersdd USAMember Posts: 2,432
    JP3804 said:

    You guys missed all the fun.

    Christmas 1975 Pong and a 13 inch black and white tv.

    Now were's my walker? :-)

    Heh-heh, we had that. Only available through Sears.
  • BrickarmorBrickarmor USAMember Posts: 1,257
    About a year ago, I sold all my favorite gaming stuff (SNES with Mega Man, Chrono Trigger, Metroid and on and on)... To pay for LEGO.
  • BanditBandit Member Posts: 890

    Bandit said:

    I had cable broadband in 1997...

    No kidding? Where? DSL wasn't even a standard until 1998 and it didn't really get rolled out until 2000 (I'm sure a few people got it before then, but I remember 2000 being the big year of it.

    I was in the central CT area then...
    @Home actually started in the bay area in 1996...

    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/@Home_Network
    and
    http://community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date=19970511&slug=2538575


  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    ^ Thanks for the links... I remember @Home, but later, in 1999 or 2000, when DSL came to Dallas.

    Excite, boy, that brings back memories! :) Lucky you to have that back in 97, 1.2 meg down, that was screaming fast back then!
  • Pacific493Pacific493 Member Posts: 379

    Where the government needs to step in is to say that such "licences" are not valid. If you buy the right to use the software, then you get it, for any computer you own, forever, without having to "ask permission" every 5 seconds.

    If I own a desktop and a notebook, I should be able to use my program on both of them.

    Further, I should be able to resell this right anytime I want, to anyone I want, so long as I don't keep a copy myself.

    I get the whole copy thing, they have to sell copies to pay the bills, but for crying out loud, if I can resell a book, which is nothing more than "bytes of data", I should be able to resell software. The only reason why they don't have restrictions on a physical book is that there is no reasonable way to have them. This is why eBooks can't be resold, because it is easy to do so.

    This is kind of where the rubber meets the road with one's belief in the free market. If I think up some really nifty software and go to the trouble and expense of developing it, why should the government have any say over the manner in which I choose to distribute the software to my customers? If I want to retain control over the software by licensing the program to customers willing to pay for a license, why should the government be able to say that I can't do that and, instead, must sell the software outright? If my calculation that my software is so valuable that people would be willing to live with the hassle of a licensing arrangement is wrong, then the free market will sort that out and my product will fail.

    gmpirate
  • RedbullgivesuwindRedbullgivesuwind Brickset's Secret HeadquatersMember Posts: 1,696
    edited February 2013

    my anti-virus updates every few hours,

    Believe me you dont want your anti virus software out of date.

    Well just to really make you feel old im 24 and I can remember everything you are talking about. My first computer was an old BBC on. And yes I mean that British Broadcasting Corporation. The only game I could play on it was a golf game they had created which you could only get to by imputing a series of codes at the start before it loaded up. I was allowed to play for half an hour on it a day. And no matter what I was doing once that half an hour was up mum used to come in and switch the computer off.

    Back on topic @Pitfall69 that is what I plan to do. I produce models for a local toy shop which gets a large number of people through the door. So I plan to use that and the little bit of lego to get kids wondering around. As well as offering them as prizes for kids reading so many books. Hopefully with it have a traditional british bookstore feel will make people linger. The longer people stay in the shop the more likely they are to buy something.
  • dragonhawkdragonhawk USMember Posts: 633
    edited February 2013
    There was a time when

    ^ Thanks for the links... I remember @Home, but later, in 1999 or 2000, when DSL came to Dallas.

    Excite, boy, that brings back memories! :) Lucky you to have that back in 97, 1.2 meg down, that was screaming fast back then!

    I remember DSL and cable broadband in 1998 too. My roommate kept switching back and forward between the two since they put a cap on his downloading bandwith. He was a big Half Life / Counter Strike player and needed every bit of the bandwith to play without the lag.

    I think in 10 years the PC screen will be projected on thin air a la Tony Stark in Ironman / the Avengers. In 15 it will probably be integrated in your brain just like in that one episode of Black Mirror

    ETA: Back in the day my customized 486SX PC could beat any Pentium1 based PCs

    This thread should be retitled "I remembered the 1990s" :)
  • gmpirategmpirate Member Posts: 1,654

    Where the government needs to step in is to say that such "licences" are not valid. If you buy the right to use the software, then you get it, for any computer you own, forever, without having to "ask permission" every 5 seconds.

    If I own a desktop and a notebook, I should be able to use my program on both of them.

    Further, I should be able to resell this right anytime I want, to anyone I want, so long as I don't keep a copy myself.

    I get the whole copy thing, they have to sell copies to pay the bills, but for crying out loud, if I can resell a book, which is nothing more than "bytes of data", I should be able to resell software. The only reason why they don't have restrictions on a physical book is that there is no reasonable way to have them. This is why eBooks can't be resold, because it is easy to do so.

    This is kind of where the rubber meets the road with one's belief in the free market. If I think up some really nifty software and go to the trouble and expense of developing it, why should the government have any say over the manner in which I choose to distribute the software to my customers? If I want to retain control over the software by licensing the program to customers willing to pay for a license, why should the government be able to say that I can't do that and, instead, must sell the software outright? If my calculation that my software is so valuable that people would be willing to live with the hassle of a licensing arrangement is wrong, then the free market will sort that out and my product will fail.

    Totally agree. If someone creates a product that is a pain in the azz to use it should be their right to do so. If its a big enough pain, a competitor can come up with an alternative.
    dragonhawk
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    ^ The only issue with that is that an unregulated free market doesn't actually work, no more than a pure socialist market works.

    You need a regulated free market, otherwise you just end up with slavery, which is the ultimate free market at work. I'm as capitalist as it comes, but I understand that in my rush to make unlimited money, I quickly will figure out that crushing everyone else is the path to doing so, and that isn't a very nice world to live in. :)

    Back to LEGO and fun! :)
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    gmpirate said:

    Totally agree. If someone creates a product that is a pain in the azz to use it should be their right to do so. If its a big enough pain, a competitor can come up with an alternative.

    What happens when a monopoly is created?

    I can't transfer my Kindle books to a Nook. I can't run Windows programs on anything else but Windows. That sort of thing.

    There is a fine line between open markets and monopoly (or duopoly, which is the same thing in the end).

    Governments are created to serve the interest of the common good. After all, city parks make no economic sense, why not sell that land to the highest bidder? Unlicensed radio spectrum as used for things like WiFi? Why not sell that to the highest bidder?
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409

    I remember DSL and cable broadband in 1998 too. My roommate kept switching back and forward between the two since they put a cap on his downloading bandwith. He was a big Half Life / Counter Strike player and needed every bit of the bandwith to play without the lag.

    Ahh, Counter Strike, many hours of fun... :)

    Of course, bandwidth helps, but lag has more to do with ping times than it does with raw data transfer speed. Sometimes a faster connection is actually laggier because of this. DSL in the early years, at least in my experience, was better for online gaming because it usually had lower ping times. Over time, cable solved this, at lease for me, I used both over the years and when I switched to cable in 2006, I found it was as lag free as DSL was back in the day.

    Of course, each experience will be different. :)

    FIOS? Anyone who hasn't tried this yet, should... amazingly low ping times, amazingly fast transfers, and *knock on wood* always on always works always full speed.

    Buying a 10GB game via Steam and having it download in 10 minutes... is amazing. :) That is actually faster than I could install the same game off DVD disks.

    I think in 10 years the PC screen will be projected on thin air a la Tony Stark in Ironman / the Avengers. In 15 it will probably be integrated in your brain just like in that one episode of Black Mirror

    I want the Iron Man suit, that would come in handy... somehow... :) Yes, images in thin air is perhaps the holy grail... Or perhaps just having them in your mind is... It is kinda creepy to think about however, but once it becomes possible, I suspect it will catch on quickly.

    ETA: Back in the day my customized 486SX PC could beat any Pentium1 based PCs

    This thread should be retitled "I remembered the 1990s" :)

    Yea, the AMD 5x86 133mhz chip was wonderful, it was really a 486 running at 133mhz, but it outran a Pentium 75 in DOS games in most cases, and cost less to boot. :) The first Pentium I owned was a Pentium 166, and that finally left the 486 systems in the dust.

    Anyone remember the 386DX-40? That was a screaming system, I played with a few, but I skipped it for personal use as I had a 386DX-25, didn't upgrade until the 486DX/2-66, which I kept a long time.

    But that isn't any fun... Bonus points to anyone who remembers NexGen and their 5x86 100mhz system. AMD finally bought them because their own designs were terrible, and that became the K6 and K7. I briefly had a NexGen system, but it was riddled with problems, I replaced it with the Pentium 166 as fast as I could afford to.

    Looking back at the thousands of dollars I spent on those computers, the $200 a Core i5 CPU costs today is downright peanuts compared to those days. :) If memory serves, the motherboard and P166 CPU alone were over $1,000 in 1996.

    Sigh... :)
  • y2joshy2josh Member Posts: 2,002

    Looking back at the thousands of dollars I spent on those computers, the $200 a Core i5 CPU costs today is downright peanuts compared to those days. :) If memory serves, the motherboard and P166 CPU alone were over $1,000 in 1996.

    Sigh... :)

    Wow. In 1996, I was in middle school and still trying to figure out how on earth I'd ever be able to pull together $200 for an N64.
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    y2josh said:

    Wow. In 1996, I was in middle school and still trying to figure out how on earth I'd ever be able to pull together $200 for an N64.

    In 96 I was working for a real estate software company, they were getting ready to put out their first multimedia training CD-ROM, so I talked the company into paying for half of my new computer if I would use it to record and encode the video for them, which I did over the next few months.

    I can't recall the video card anymore that I used for that, but I do know I needed a pair of Micropolis 4.3GB SCSI AV hard drives that cost a pretty penny to do it, and the video was only 240x180 resolution when I was done with it! :)

    Had the VCR hooked up to the computer to record the video segments, then had to compress them to... I think... cinepak format for the software they were using.

    Fun stuff, now all very easy and simple on any computer, but hard to do back then and required expensive equipment.
  • YellowcastleYellowcastle Member Posts: 4,401
    This discussion was created from comments split from: How Legal is it to Use Amazon as a Supplier.
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409

    This discussion was created from comments split from: How Legal is it to Use Amazon as a Supplier.

    Thank you for moving it, and not just deleting it. :)
    dragonhawk
  • YellowcastleYellowcastle Member Posts: 4,401
    If I deleted every Darth Texas tangent, the Forum would implode and cats and dogs would begin living together. It would be as if millions of voices cried out in pain but were then suddenly silenced. ;o)
    sidersddRedbullgivesuwind
  • JP3804JP3804 Member Posts: 332
    ^ LOL Excellent!

    Reliving your childhood is part of the Lego experience isn't it?
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,234
    ^^ The topic train always seems to come off the rails when Darth Texas is around :)

    Oh...wait...a Darth Texas Train. I wonder what that would look like? Probably a combination of the Holiday Train and the Ghost Train. I'm all aboard as long as it goes up in value :)
  • BastaBasta Australia Member Posts: 1,259
    edited February 2013
    As it has its own topic now, my first computer/game system was in about 1985, it was a Dick Smith VZ-300 (same model as the VTech Laser 310) it had 16K RAM, it did 8 colours from memory, software came on cassette tapes, I remember having to load the games and getting impatient waiting. Space invaders, Missile Attack & Chopper Rescue were my favourite's.

    Funny thing is, I still have this sitting in my draw at work, although I don’t know where the tape player or power supply is.
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,234
    I used to have this Computer/Gaming system called the Coleco ADAM. It too had tapes with games that you load onto the system and it played Coleco games.
  • BustinBustin Member Posts: 286
    Cassette systems were the worst to get to run sometimes. I was so glad when we got our first 5.25 floppy system.
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,234
    Yeah, they eventually switched them out for floppy. I used to save info on punch cards at one time.
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    Pitfall69 said:

    I used to have this Computer/Gaming system called the Coleco ADAM. It too had tapes with games that you load onto the system and it played Coleco games.

    Ahh, I remember the Adam! My older brother got that for Christmas way back when, it never did work right, or there was something wrong with it, I remember it being returned to the store, but not why, I was a bit young to know or care about that. :)
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