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Wow, 1 lego brick sold for 14K on ebay

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Comments

  • mrtonytjmrtonytj Guest Posts: 214
    It didn't actually sell for $14k.. A best offer was accepted. I offered him $3000 a few months back(as it has been available for about 6 months) and he refused.
  • LURKERnumber2149LURKERnumber2149 Member Posts: 15
    wonder what it went for
  • RennyRenny USAMember Posts: 1,145
    edited January 2013
    That is ridiculous. Current gold value (US) per gram is about $54. That brick has about 26 grams of gold which equals about $1400. Paying 10 times that amount seems crazy to me but to each their own I guess.
    madforLEGOZacherano
  • mrtonytjmrtonytj Guest Posts: 214
    Well think of it this way. The gram and a half of plastic that goes into a chrome c-3po costs about 0.02 of a cent but they sell for $500! What is crazier!!!???
    icey117Zacherano
  • RennyRenny USAMember Posts: 1,145
    That's true. Too rich for this beagle's blood.
  • mrtonytjmrtonytj Guest Posts: 214
    And by the way that's 250,000 times more! Not 10 times. And at least gold has an intrinsic value.
  • y2joshy2josh Member Posts: 2,002
    ^Sounds like someone's never seen "The Rip Van Winkle Caper." ;D
    timinchicago
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409

    wonder what it went for

    $12,500
  • LegobrandonCPLegobrandonCP CanadaMember Posts: 1,918

    wonder what it went for

    $12,500
    You were the one that bought it, weren't you? ;-)
  • brickmaticbrickmatic Member Posts: 1,071

    wonder what it went for

    $12,500
    You were the one that bought it, weren't you? ;-)
    Ah hahaha... I bet he was!
  • y2joshy2josh Member Posts: 2,002
    ^Per that article, "It was a tough call for me, to be honest, because I really didn't want to sell it."

    Which, I assume, is why he spent ~5 months attempting to hawk it on eBay.
    yys4u
  • murphquakemurphquake Member Posts: 651
    now i'm looking at this website... hope he's making money but it seems silly to have plastic cased lego when you could just open it and build it
  • FattehFatteh Member Posts: 21

    wonder what it went for

    $12,500
    You were the one that bought it, weren't you? ;-)
    Ah hahaha... I bet he was!
    Maybe. Maybe not.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 20,308
    y2josh said:

    ^Per that article, "It was a tough call for me, to be honest, because I really didn't want to sell it."

    Which, I assume, is why he spent ~5 months attempting to hawk it on eBay.


    And he bought it nine months before selling it. He's just a reseller ...
  • cheshirecatcheshirecat Member Posts: 5,332
    ^ Yep, the word collector did seem odd. It wasn't even 9 months, he didn't get it then, after not getting it 9 months ago he negotiated with the person that did, so that probably took right up to the moment it appeared on ebay.
  • richoricho Member Posts: 3,830
    Also, I am not sure if everybody is aware of how gold is classified, but 14k gold is around 58% gold, with the other 42% likely to be silver. This means the gold content is less than you think. Fine gold, which is 24k is .999 gold, but quite soft, 22k gold is 91% gold. Must wedding rings are 18k to add copper, silver or other alloy to give extra strength.

    In summary, there is therefore only around 15 grams of actual fine gold in this brick, which at $54 / £34.30 per gram is $814 / £514.50 of fine gold. Regardless of whether you are a huge fan of lego, I would strongly recommend investing in bullion close to spot over this brick! :-)
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 20,308
    edited January 2013
    So what is an old master worth? Some canvas, and some old dried oil with pigment in that is very difficult to salvage and re-use. Maybe a quid or two.

    Investment is more than just scrap value. If people are going to want these in the future and are going to be willing to pay top dollar for them, it could be a good investment. No doubt it was a good investment for the seller, as I'm sure he would have paid more than scrap value for it.

    What is a UCS MF worth once acetone is poured over it to recover the ABS?

  • SirKevbagsSirKevbags Fairy Land Member Posts: 4,030
    Out of curiosity how much do we think it costs to get a set like #10179 appraised by these toy graders and imprisoned into clear plastic?
  • richoricho Member Posts: 3,830
    edited January 2013
    ^^ I was just trying to explain that the gold market tends to be quite ruthless in often reverting to spot to value things.

    As an example, ebay or whatever marketplace or market you pick will be full of items all costing more than their base material value, even more so in certain areas like antiques. Choose anything made of gold, and it's very hard to find items that sell for more than the current spot price of gold.
  • jockosjunglejockosjungle Member Posts: 701
    To be fair, whoever bought it probably didn't do so to send it to Cash4gold.com

    The value is the rarity, rather than the scrap value of gold
    MathBuilder
  • mrtonytjmrtonytj Guest Posts: 214

    To be fair, whoever bought it probably didn't do so to send it to Cash4gold.com

    The value is the rarity, rather than the scrap value of gold

    Indeed, that's the exact reason why i still want a gold c3po! I have one that i got made but it is not the same and i would be willing to pay 20 times what i paid to get one made!
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 10,479
    edited January 2013
    Thanks @Rocao for the link to the article
    I think the guy implies that it would be hard to work at a company for 25 years.
    Personally I do not think it would be hard for most of us to work at LEGO for 25 years, and not just for a gold brick :-)
  • samiam391samiam391 A log cabin in PA, United StatesMember Posts: 4,418
    kevbags said:

    Out of curiosity how much do we think it costs to get a set like #10179 appraised by these toy graders and imprisoned into clear plastic?

    A pretty decent penny. I contacted AFA grading about getting some of my items graded and it was going to cost me roughly $50+ for 2 minifigures in a UV protective case.

    I don't really care for the case, it's more about the authentication. I know they are real, but if I choose to sell it in the future, the buyer probably would like some solid proof too that they are real.

    Collectors who are willing to dish out $3,000 for a set, such as 10179, want to make sure that they are getting the best of the best. Lets face it, if you dish out $3,000, you want mint condition. That's where John has capitalized on this type of buyer. AFA grading goes on a 10 point scale and looks over the entire item and makes sure that it is mint (or not mint). They look for any little flaw to take it down from a "10". When a buyer purchases one of John's items, they are assured that the item they are purchasing is a 10, or 8, or 9.5, etc..

    I imagine that these sets are more for people who planning on purchasing it for a MISB collection, as opposed to one they are going to open.

    I can't say I agree with it, as once you encase it (unless you get a custom case), it's almost impossible to take it out.. however, if it garners John a profit, than all the best to him!
  • samiam391samiam391 A log cabin in PA, United StatesMember Posts: 4,418
    edited January 2013
    .
  • cheshirecatcheshirecat Member Posts: 5,332
    ^ Just to point out, in the case of 10179 its only the box thats graded - is it not? The box may be a 10, or a 9 or an 8. But the contents could be a few bags of MB, parts could be missing, damaged or the instructions could be bent. Nobody knows.
  • SirKevbagsSirKevbags Fairy Land Member Posts: 4,030
    I was just curious about the margin. Purchase of the set + grading + plastic box say $5000 tops? Pretty healthy IF it sells.
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 10,479
    ^-- well, this discussion is in another thread somewhere, but according to the group that does this they inspect the stickers with a scope to determine if the seals are lifted.. even then I am highly dubious of how to authenticate the contents (short of Xraying it)
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409

    wonder what it went for

    $12,500
    You were the one that bought it, weren't you? ;-)
    Nope, I just happen to know what it sold for...
  • cheshirecatcheshirecat Member Posts: 5,332
    edited January 2013
    ^^^ IF you can find someone stupid enough to buy it then the margins are amazing. Of course if you can find someone stupid enough you could sell them the moon. However, take this as an example...

    Shirtless Darth Maul , your's for the bargainous price of $499.99. Although I would like to think you can get your money back for false advertising. It very much wasn't a toy fair EXCLUSIVE.

    http://www.brickenvy.com/Shop/p-781-Darth-Maul---Shirtless-Promo-Minifigure---AFA-10.0.html
  • richoricho Member Posts: 3,830
    rare?, yes, but easily replicated, yes as well, which is another risk.
  • HardradaHardrada Member Posts: 439
    I think the Minecraft set at $ 350 is also quite funny. I'd rather order 10 of the set for RRP. I'm sure at least one would arrive to me in a pristine box.
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    Hardrada said:

    I think the Minecraft set at $ 350 is also quite funny. I'd rather order 10 of the set for RRP. I'm sure at least one would arrive to me in a pristine box.

    Of course, but you're not the target audience, and it isn't as much about a mint box, as it is about a graded mint box.

    The number of people who care about this is small, and almost none of them are here.

    But they do exist. :)
  • SirKevbagsSirKevbags Fairy Land Member Posts: 4,030
    I'm with you on this one Martyn. I would be amazed if either the Falcon or Maul sold at those prices. At least we have an idea of grading cost and prison cell for a figure.

    @samiam391 you mention about wanting to authenticate some figures? Have any of us encountered fake figures? I'm not talking about finding MB in a mixed lot or key chain figures passed off as the real deal. Are there fakes out there?
  • cheshirecatcheshirecat Member Posts: 5,332
    edited January 2013
    ^^ And TLG have recently released a set that would be the perfect place for them to live.

    I actually kind of hope that non of them are here.
  • cheshirecatcheshirecat Member Posts: 5,332
    @richo - indeed and this one doesn't seem to come with any certificate of authenticity nor any authenticated information about its history. Is it a coincidence that it wasn't graded and encased in plastic?
  • mrtonytjmrtonytj Guest Posts: 214
    It came with paperwork.
  • JosephJoseph Member Posts: 651
    edited January 2013
    @madforLEGO I believe this is what you were looking for:
    BrickEnvy said:

    Now as far as what AFA looks for when it comes to grading LEGO goes, the very first thing they do is examine the seals of any given set. If the seals are broken or if they look like they have been tampered with, most of the time AFA will simply not grade the set. This holds true especially if the set contained expensive minifigures, like that Cloud City. AFA uses high powered microscopes to check the seals and overall condition of any box they are grading. To the naked eye, it may look like you have done a great job resealing a set or regluing a box, but when you see it through these microscopes, you can clearly tell what has and has not been tampered with. AFA did not get where they are in the industry today by grading sealed Star Wars vehicle boxes that had been filled up with old broken He-Man figures =) After they determine that the seals are completely intact, they go on the grade the outer box, yes... just the box. There is no way to grade the content of any sealed item like this. Could some of the piece inside be discolored or maybe a torn set of instructions...its possible, but when you are grading sealed set, the contents just do not matter. You can only grade what you can see. This is just how it is when you are grading sealed, windowless boxes and everytime you see an AFA G.I.Joe set from the 80s of any Star Wars vehicle or playset from the 70s & 80s, this is how it is done.

  • ReliantReliant Member Posts: 68
    Dang I can't believe the comments on this piece. Expensive? Sure.

    I think it's one of the coolest Lego collectables around.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 20,308
    Hardrada said:

    I think the Minecraft set at $ 350 is also quite funny. I'd rather order 10 of the set for RRP. I'm sure at least one would arrive to me in a pristine box.

    It's only a 9. I wonder what happened to it on it's journey to lose the 10.

  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 10,479
    ^-- it was probably shipped from a warehouse, I mean a '10' is MINT, and many times even the factory does not put out 'mint' boxes...
  • samiam391samiam391 A log cabin in PA, United StatesMember Posts: 4,418

    ^ Just to point out, in the case of 10179 its only the box thats graded - is it not? The box may be a 10, or a 9 or an 8. But the contents could be a few bags of MB, parts could be missing, damaged or the instructions could be bent. Nobody knows.

    Yes, obviously if they wanted to grade the actual contents of the set, the MISB label would be destroyed.

    Lets face it too, if you are dishing out $5,000+ for a set that sells for a roughly $2,000 set, you are doing so because you want a mint box (that was AFA graded), not because you plan on building the set.
  • SirKevbagsSirKevbags Fairy Land Member Posts: 4,030
    Without knowing the exact grading cost its tricky I know but if you want a graded set why not just buy the set and send it off to be graded. It can't be so hard to find grade worthy examples can it?
  • samiam391samiam391 A log cabin in PA, United StatesMember Posts: 4,418
    kevbags said:

    Without knowing the exact grading cost its tricky I know but if you want a graded set why not just buy the set and send it off to be graded. It can't be so hard to find grade worthy examples can it?

    Good question, who knows honestly... some people prefer other people to do the work for them, rather than they do it themselves.

    To make that above statement sound better, some people also believe to leave something as "professional" as grading, in the hands of those who have done it several times before.

    There's also risk that if you purchase a set that is described as mint, that you receive it in less than mint condition. This would take its stock from a "10" to an "8", when the buyer didn't want anything less than a "9". It all sounds stupid, throwing numbers about, but you do have to believe that this is what these people who buy the AFA graded sets, think.

    Surely, you would save money, however there is a risk factor coupled with it. A risk that people who can afford a $5,000 set in the first place, would prefer to not have to deal with.
  • richoricho Member Posts: 3,830
    edited January 2013
    A long time ago I was really in to old Kenner and Palitoy Star Wars figs, and I had a few graded with the AFA. Looking back, I wouldn't do it now if I had the decision again. For lego I certainly wouldn't, but as with anything, it's a personal choice, and if you are a collector who knows deep down you will never open the set, then I guess that's one reason, another would be a reseller hoping a high grade commands a premium.
  • samiam391samiam391 A log cabin in PA, United StatesMember Posts: 4,418
    richo said:

    A long time ago I was really in to old Kenner and Palitoy Star Wars figs, and I had a few graded with the AFA. Looking back, I wouldn't do it now if I had the decision again. For lego I certainly wouldn't.

    I would only ever grade my LEGO if I could have a custom case made that let me take the figures in and out. This would probably ruin the grading system... but...

    Seeing those figures imprisoned in a case, would just break my heart.
  • richoricho Member Posts: 3,830
    edited January 2013
    Also, in a new market like lego, you are likely to get a few labelling errors. It's taken me a 5 min search to find this. It's labelled up as Star Wars.

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2007-LEGO-INDIANA-JONES-ORIGINAL-MINIFIGURE-GRADED-AFA-9-5-/221167136265?pt=Building_Toys_US&hash=item337e96ae09

    The completed listings are a real mixed bag. Some figures and sets have done well, with a huge premium, other loose figures have sold only for roughly their current market value, which means the roughly £20 per fig grading cost for loose figs is just a pure cost.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 20,308
    richo said:

    Also, in a new market like lego, you are likely to get a few labelling errors. It's taken me a 5 min search to find this. It's labelled up as Star Wars.

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2007-LEGO-INDIANA-JONES-ORIGINAL-MINIFIGURE-GRADED-AFA-9-5-/221167136265?pt=Building_Toys_US&hash=item337e96ae09

    The completed listings are a real mixed bag. Some figures and sets have done well, with a huge premium, other loose figures have sold only for roughly their current market value, which means the roughly £20 per fig grading cost for loose figs is just a pure cost.

    That just shows what a farce the grading is. If you are going to charge to certify a figure and grade it, you should definitely check what is then printed on the label. If they can mistakenly write Star Wars instead of Indiana Jones, then they can write 9.5 instead of 6.5.
  • Mad_DogMad_Dog SpainMember Posts: 71
    All this has been talked about before, and even escalated into nearly insulting people, and someone rating the rest, so I would like to remember everybody that this issue may become hot & scary.

    About the gold brick, it would be nice to have one in the collection, but the real deal here is being there to "earn it" if you know what I mean, you have to feel proud, I am pretty sure of that, also if I would have received it as a gift I would never sell it, of course my descendants may think different, but that is what testaments are for :-D

    Rgrds

    J.
  • Thanos75Thanos75 Member Posts: 1,120
    edited January 2013
    Grading has its ups and downs. My main hobby is comics...my near second being LEGO. When a comic is graded people are looking for that "10". Its almost impossible so the average "mint" grade is 9.8. The 10 grade being so rare that if you sent in a book to be graded that you would normally find in a dollar boxand it ended up being a 10 then it could go for hundreds of dollars. There are people in the hobby that only collect 10's...doesnt matter what the book is. On the plus side...whenever a high value graded book sells it draws lots of attention and brings people in on the hunt for books to be graded. On the downside...for some....it actually can lower the value on books that dont grade high. I have actually seen lots of cases where graded books that only received a 7-9 grade go for less then an ungraded book. The actually have subscription services that will sell you your weekly books already sealed and graded at 9.8. Can you imagine buying a LEGO set from a retailer already sealed and graded? I know how much extra space my graded comics take up and I know how much space my LEGO collection takes up...I cant imagine how much space a graded LEGO collection would consume.
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