Best for Reselling: Large Sets vs. Small Sets?

Farmer_JohnFarmer_John USA - 4,035 Miles from 62 West Wallaby St., Wigan, Lancashire, UKMember Posts: 2,404
edited February 2012 in Buying & Selling Topics
Is it better to purchase smaller or larger sets from a resale standpoint? I've thought about this for awhile because there are so many factors that can impact the sets I purchase with the intent of reselling:

1) Required storage space - Recently, I've had to invest in additional storage space as many others have had to do as well. Obviously, smaller sets take less room.

2) Ease of packing - I tend to repack my sets in larger cardboard boxes to help protect the set boxes. A set like the IF fills up 2/3 of a lego shipping box and it can be tricky filling in the remaining empty space within the shipping box (to be more efficient space-wise). It is much easier/efficient packing smaller sets in a larger protective cardboard box than it is with larger sets.

3) Cost to sell per set - It seems like a single larger set would have less fees on average than multiple smaller sets of the same overall value. I'm thinking of eBay fees, Amazon fees, etc., shipping and handling fees, and even time processing/packing and taking to the post office.

4) Cost to purchase per set by reseller - It may be easier to afford smaller sets that are on sale prior to the EOLing of that particular set. Unfortunately it may take more work to find multiple smaller sets that equal one larger set.

5) Rarity of sets (assuming there are less larger sets) - I have no idea on this item. Conventional wisdom would say that larger sets would be rarer due to their higher price. But I guess one also has to take into account how long a given set has been out.

6) Demand of smaller sets vs. larger sets in the aftermarket - Is there a difference? I would assume that the larger sets would be more in demand due to their rarity (with respect to smaller sets)?

7) Affordability for buyer in the aftermarket - Are smaller sets more affordable (relatively speaking) than larger sets after EOL? If the price per piece is constant, then they should be; however, affordability may not be a big aspect if someone is purchasing something they consider to be rare or desirable.

8) Profitability - This is the most important item on the list for the reseller (and me). After everything is considered, which is more profitable: smaller sets, larger sets, or unknown.

9) Etc..... - There may be other factors to be considered regarding the size of sets to purchase with the intent to resell.

It seems like everyone is grabbing larger sets (including me, but I may just be going along with the crowd) such as IF, EN, HP DA, etc. I guess I'm wondering what the sweet spot is (or is there one) for the best-sized set to purchase with the intent to resell assuming everything else is equal (which may also be a bad assumption)? Or is it all a wash?
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Comments

  • gmpirategmpirate Member Posts: 1,654
    Large sets. better money, less work
  • parkerwilsonparkerwilson Member Posts: 142
    I personally dont think most smaller sets have the same wow factor that some of the larger sets have, thus making the larger sets a more sought after piece after retirement.
  • cloaked7cloaked7 Member Posts: 1,448
    I got some Hero Factory Von Nebula sets at Target on clearance last year for $15, then sold them a few months later, during Christmas for $55. The nice thing about those sets, as with some smaller sets, is that they are easy to ship. I put them in a USPS Priority Mail box (which are free) which requires no taping, no peanuts, no hassle, and my local USPS person picks them up. Ultra simple to ship. Plus, I get a lot more feedback on eBay. It's great to have 50+ positive feedback entries per a month when people check.

    Not saying that smaller sets are the way to go. Just saying I don't automatically dismiss them. If the set will fit in a USPS Priority Mail box it is a big plus to me.

    Yup, I have sold a MF for $1,000+ and made a huge profit off of it. But, I was so paranoid about it getting to the buyer in primo condition I double boxed it and insured it with signature. The insurance was pricey and the seller didn't like having to sign for it. It was a bit of a headache. Not complaining, just saying that big boxes have their own set of hassles. Just my take on it.

    Personally I sell whatever I think will bring a nice profit. I guess I am one of those that don't put all of my eggs in one basket kinda guys.

    I have sold Indiana Jones, Spongebob, Star Wars, Creator, POC. Big and small.
  • Farmer_JohnFarmer_John USA - 4,035 Miles from 62 West Wallaby St., Wigan, Lancashire, UKMember Posts: 2,404
    edited February 2012
    I have sold Indiana Jones, Spongebob, Star Wars, Creator, POC. Big and small.
    Actually, your post is kind of what I think too. I have everything large and small, but am more concerned about shipping and handling, getting an unethical buyer, and storage of the larger sets. Smaller sets are easier in a lot of ways (e.g., USPS Priority Boxes, reduced risk, etc.). Larger sets require less total work and can bring in more money due to reduced overall fees, perhaps more popular in general due to rarity, etc.

    Overall, are the percentage margins (not the real dollars, euros, etc.) about the same for large and small sets? For example, I noticed that the Power Miner Stone Chopper (8956) that originally went for $6 for MISB is now going for close to $20 including S&H. That's about 3X for a small set that was EOL'd a couple years ago. I remember that TRU was dumping them at $2.50 per set shortly after they were EOL'd and I grabbed about 20. So for me the percent margin would be about 5X after fees have been applied. So, do larger sets typically bring in 5X after they are EOL'd? I realize that I would have to sell more smaller sets to equate to a single larger set, and by doing that I might be "flooding the market" and eroding my own margins.
  • cloaked7cloaked7 Member Posts: 1,448
    Not to go off on a tangent, but it is just the way all products are. The more expensive the product, the fewer are sold. Whether it be LEGOS, guns, cars.

    So, the larger sets are more rare, but the smaller sets are more affordable to the masses (and more plentiful). No secret there. As just stated, getting 5X profit on a $20 item is easier than with a $200 item, and they sell easier. A lot of people put a limit on a gift price. Whether it be $20, $50, $100, or $500. I am sure there are many more $20 limits. Again, probably stating things you already know.
  • YellowcastleYellowcastle Member Posts: 4,401
    The more expensive the product, the fewer are sold. Whether it be LEGOS, guns, cars.
    The backbone products of the US of A. ;o)

  • Farmer_JohnFarmer_John USA - 4,035 Miles from 62 West Wallaby St., Wigan, Lancashire, UKMember Posts: 2,404
    Another reason for me to think "small" when purchasing sets to resell is that I don't stress my wife out as much. During the last BF sale, I had my very own Fedex truck delivering boxes to the door. Kind of freaked the wife...
  • gmpirategmpirate Member Posts: 1,654
    Think it comes down to time. If you have the time, or you want to make the time regardless, the returns good on small sets. But when you can make the same money on "one" large set compared to "two or three" smaller sets the decision is easy at least for me.

    This is coming from the perspective of already owning a separate business. No matter how you rationalize it, this is taking time away from your business, job, family, hobbies, what have you. Bigger sets just make the most sense for these reasons.

    Now, if you are making this your business or your job/career responsibilities are minimal its a different story completely. The more you sell, the more you will sell as you drive more traffic to your store.
  • BuriedinBricksBuriedinBricks USAMember Posts: 1,366
    From the perspective of an AFOL just coming out of his dark ages: The sets I'm looking to pick up now from the 15 years I was not collecting are the big sets. Most of the small stuff is not even on my radar.

    I suppose I could be interested in the smaller stuff if I ever focus on trying to complete an entire theme, but right now I'm mainly looking at sets that had a RRP at $100+.
  • akunthitaakunthita USAMember Posts: 1,028
    Besides the excellent points made above, I would like to add one more. I look for sets that are not just great sets (big or small), but have an excellent part-out value. Because in case I cannot sell the set as it is, I can always part it out, and that is pretty much a garanteed profit, as long as most of the parts sell well. From this perspective the modular buildings and the large sets with rare or semi-rare colors (like the Statue of Liberty or the London Bridge) are excellent! You can pretty much sell everything from those sets for a great price! Smaller sets are also fine as long as the parts sell well. It's just something to think about...(c;
  • canuhandle23canuhandle23 Member Posts: 104
    BIG...Big.... Big....

    I mean every set 200 plus or more always goes up....and worst case scenario you get the retail price. The only small set I would get right now at its rrp is the Dynamic duo since that set will be a 100 dollar set whenever its EOL. Now if you find sets for beyond cheap then thats another thing
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    There are not too many $200+ Lego sets... :)
  • canuhandle23canuhandle23 Member Posts: 104
    I know..thats why i always buy many of them. I always make big profit on all the 199 or higher sets. They never seem to fail....
  • dk1007dk1007 Member Posts: 49
    I like the point of don't put all your egg in one basket, too risky. Set a budget for your purchase is a good idea too.
  • Si_UKNZSi_UKNZ NZMember Posts: 4,179
    edited February 2012


    The case for large sets:
    - Usually better quality/ design, more likely to be iconic/ classics.
    - Higher demand: Many kids wont have been able to afford them so will have missed out
    - More aspirational: people feel more ready to buy into the dream of a 200% price hike on the Taj Mahal then on a creator Log Cabin
    - All other things being equal, with smaller sets you need to sell more to make the same amount of profit, which is more hassle and overall higher postage cost.

    The case against large sets:
    - It's what everyone else does so is likely to become saturated soon, if not already.
    - A pain to store. Personally, I have a lot more problems with the larger sets, as I like to seal them into plastic boxes for full protection, and its harder to get storage boxes large enough - I have to cobble together two joined together.
    - They need larger boxes to ship in which also take more space
    - They're a pain to take to the post office, and usually need to be taken by car rather than walking.
    - Seldom on discount, at least not by as much
    - Less likely to be affordable by kids/ parents after any hikes, so youre relying on the (much smaller) AFOL market much of the time.

    I get a mixture of both, but now I think about it, I should be going for more middle sized sets.
  • AvengerDrAvengerDr Member Posts: 453
    edited February 2012
    Just a heads up about "taking large sets" to the post office. Not only you'll end up paying more but you'll even lose more time. I recently discovered a UK website which is like a quote finder for courier companies. I had the cheapest company come pick up a big parcel (13+kg, 50x50x20cm) at my office with no problem at all for about 7£. I don't have any connections with them.. But it helps me offer competitive shipping prices..

    It really pains me to see ebay auctions of people asking 20£ to ship a parcel that wouldn't take more than 7-8£ using those services.
  • evileddie1313evileddie1313 Member Posts: 126
    edited February 2012
    I did some research on a similar topic and found that the Lego STAR WARS mini building sets are a Lego seller/investor's best friend.

    The smallest sets have the biggest appreciation...

    Lego STAR WARS Mini Building Sets

    They are small, inexpensive, store easily, mail easily, accurate in appearance, simple to build, fun and bring back a big bang for your investment dollar!
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    @evileddie1313 - that may be true...

    You wrote:

    "While the larger STAR WARS sets, such as the Millennium Falcon, set #10179-1, are the 'Belles of the Investment Ball,' the miniature version of the Millennium Falcon, set #4488-1, has more than doubled the 10179's appreciation percentage."

    Yes, but you can't fairly make that comparison...

    10179 was released in 2007, 4488 was released in 2003, so it is from another time.

    In addition, compared to buying and selling a single 10179, to get the same "investment", you would have had to buy 71 of the mini-Falcons, which means you'd have to make 71 separate sales, ship 71 separate packages, etc.

    More money, but lots more work...
  • evileddie1313evileddie1313 Member Posts: 126
    @LegoFanTexas You have some valid points, but basically, I was talking about percentage return on the original investment. It is not a perfect comparison, but every Lego collector under the sun knows the 10179, so I used it because AFOLs could relate. To be honest, take out a couple of those years from the 4488 and you would still probably get the same, if not better appreciation percentage than the 10179.

    Not every Lego collector/investor has the money to invest in the large Lego sets. The article was written to tell people that there is money to be made from the smaller sets, if the larger, pricier sets are not an option.
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409

    - More aspirational: people feel more ready to buy into the dream of a 200% price hike on the Taj Mahal then on a creator Log Cabin
    I wouldn't knock Log Cabin, I own 10 of them, I think it will do very well after market... :) Just the right "size" to jump to $90 or so when retired for a quick triple... And $90 is still very affordable for most of the market. It also isn't another "family house" set, I don't see another Log Cabin in the Creator lineup...

    - A pain to store. Personally, I have a lot more problems with the larger sets, as I like to seal them into plastic boxes for full protection, and its harder to get storage boxes large enough - I have to cobble together two joined together.
    I would submit that if you're really buying more than a handful of sets to resell, you should be just buying the proper sized boxes.

    24x16x4" boxes cover a lot of what Lego makes (Battle of Endor for example)
    24x20x4" boxes cover the larger stuff (Fire Brigade for example)

    These boxes are not that expensive when purchased 25 at at time (less than a dollar each), so if you're serious about buying 5 of this and 10 of that, buy some boxes, you'll find you have less shipping damage, much less hassle when packing, and happier customers.
    - They're a pain to take to the post office, and usually need to be taken by car rather than walking.
    This is a location specific problem... Come to Texas, you have to drive everywhere because if you walked, it would take an hour to go anywhere. :)

    I don't use the post office for Lego anyway, I ship it all FedEx Ground, gets there in much better condition for about the same money, or less, and includes insurance and tracking with every sale.
  • Farmer_JohnFarmer_John USA - 4,035 Miles from 62 West Wallaby St., Wigan, Lancashire, UKMember Posts: 2,404
    edited February 2012
    Out of curiosity, what would be considered a "Large Set" and "Small Set" from the RRP standpoint?

    Small Set < $50
    Large >$50

    Thoughts and comments?
  • evileddie1313evileddie1313 Member Posts: 126
    @Farmer_John I would say that would be a fair price guide for argument's sake.
  • gmpirategmpirate Member Posts: 1,654
    Bigger sets are in the $100 range in my opinion and I gather the same from talking to others.

    @evileddie1313 If I was 16 I would be all over the poly bags. I get sucked into doing smaller sets and minifigs here and there and quickly realize why I prefer not to every time. They are one way of driving more traffic to your store, however.
  • Si_UKNZSi_UKNZ NZMember Posts: 4,179
    edited February 2012
    Bigger sets are in the $100 range in my opinion and I gather the same from talking to others.
    Id agree with that.
    you should be just buying the proper sized boxes.
    I agree but havent seen anywhere that sells them, except some online at £50 each!
  • evileddie1313evileddie1313 Member Posts: 126
    edited February 2012
    @gmpirate I love and collect all types of Lego sets, but I can see with the world economy the way that it is and a weak economic future, that 'smaller' and cost effective Lego sets will be a popular option. The mini sets, especially the STAR WARS theme, are pretty cool IMO, but like you, I would rather have a full size Star Destroyer(10030) instead of a mini one(4492).
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    edited February 2012
    I agree but havent seen anywhere that sells them, except some online at £50 each!
    You are in the UK, so I have no solution for you, but there should be a box company like ULine that does this sort of thing: ULine.com

    Take a quick look, there must be something similar in the UK
  • richoricho Member Posts: 3,821
    edited February 2012
    Am not a reseller, but I would say large sets if I was. The reason for this would be that it's one transaction, so less effort, and perhaps less risk than multiple small transactions, although I guess high value items seem to come with their own specific risk.

    I do however think that somewhere down the line a small/medium set will catch a lot of people out and perform really well on the secondary market due to lack of supply. Having said that, some of you crazy people seem to have 10+ copies of every single set in existence!

    @gmpirate or @LegoFanTexas,

    I would be fascinated to know of any sets you have specifically avoided from the popular lines!
  • gmpirategmpirate Member Posts: 1,654
    As others have attested, there is very little risk "if" you are buying at significant discount. I really never look at "avoiding" any sets, but rather buy what I feel are the "best" bets. Keep mainstream and iconic.

    I finally just sold my last Tie Crawler last week at RRP. I only bought them originally to flip quickly before they became widely available (which I don't do anymore). I would never recommend sets like the current T-6 Shuttle, Gunship Geonosian Starship or Cane Bane's Speeder although I did pick them up at 50% or less. These kinds of sets just don't appreciate -- RRP at best. Sometimes the minifigs make them somewhat viable like Commander Cody in the Geonosian :P You can sell off the minifigs and keep the ship for some great parts on the cheap ;)

    Off topic maybe, but there's a lot of sets to buy where you can just sell off some elements and keep the rest for free or for very little. Thinking the Batcave elements might be great for some Star Wars Base Moc someday I parted out a bunch of sets. Wound up with a bunch of free or close-to-free batcaves. Costs me time, true, but sometimes such ventures amuse me :P
  • richoricho Member Posts: 3,821
    edited February 2012
    @gmpirate,

    The exception to the sets you mention there, for me at least, would be the Cad Bane Speeder. It wasn't that widely available, and the minifigs are great, so I think that might do ok. Agreed on the others. I actually only bought the T-6 Shuttle because it was so heavily discounted recently in the UK (£25), there is something a tad boring about it.

    rich
  • cloaked7cloaked7 Member Posts: 1,448
    edited February 2012
    So, how do you all thing the 7965 MF will do? Also, when do you think it will EOL?
  • gmpirategmpirate Member Posts: 1,654
    No clue on EOL, but it should do well. Its a repeat, but its still the most iconic and not cheap. 7676 is a good example. It was a repeat but iconic/popular anyway. They were were $120 RRP and I've been selling them at $300 a pop.
  • thecleatorthecleator Member Posts: 70
    I believe Cad Banes Speeder is a good future buy especially if the show develops young fans who later becomes collectors. The T-6 is probably going to go up based on how Shak Tii goes up she is a very desirable minifig.
  • FatMattFatMatt USMember Posts: 502
    edited February 2012
    @LegoFanTexas- Do you have some suggestions where to buy 24x16x4 & 24x20x4 sturdy boxes in bulk for low cost in the US? I am in IL. I know I've seen it in another thread on here, but can't find it at the moment.

    Or anyone else for that matter?
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    Uline.com
  • FatMattFatMatt USMember Posts: 502
    ^Thank you
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    :)
  • Farmer_JohnFarmer_John USA - 4,035 Miles from 62 West Wallaby St., Wigan, Lancashire, UKMember Posts: 2,404
    So, how do you all thing the 7965 MF will do? Also, we do you think it will EOL?
    I think the new MF will do well in the after market, but I don't think that will be for another year at the earliest. It is iconic, priced well, and very playable. Actually, I've been waiting to pick a few of these up on the cheap (I already got one from TRU during a sale last year). If I do find a reasonable price, I may get an extra one to build for me. ;-)

    If anyone hears about any sales on 7965, please post....
  • misatomisato Banned Posts: 12
    edited February 2012

    So, how do you all thing the 7965 MF will do? Also, we do you think it will EOL?
    Well, it definately won't do as good as the 10179 Ultimate Collector Series Millenium Falcon. The UCS series generally command a higher price than the standard Lego sets, and the 10179 M Falcon is like the most valuable Ultimate Collector Series set. People are already asking $1,500.oo, $2,000.00 and even $2,500.00 for it. It came out in 2007 and you don't have to hold on to those UCS sets too long before they start skyrocketing in price.

    I have always said that the smart investors don't invest in wall street, stock market, mutual funds, 401k, or any of that crap that can also loose you money. The smart invester buy Lego sets, hold onto them for a few years, then sell them at like 500% profit. A MUCH better return on your investment that you will never see in any stocks or bonds. =D

    Removed Signature Block:YC 2/13/12
  • tk79tk79 Member Posts: 329
    edited February 2012
    ^ awful advice full of so many errors...

    stocks can and do see 500% increases in relatively short periods of time.

    401k usually allows "free money" in that you often get some % company match...it would be silly not to take advantage of that.

    Using the UCS MF as an example on why to invest in Lego is like using AAPL as an example to put ALL your money in tech stocks...speaking of which If you put $400 in AAPL 5 yrs ago it would be worth apprx $2000 today, same as the UCS except without the giant box in your closet and no worries about selling to a shady buyer and losing a large % of your profit for 5 years "work".

    If you want to invest in Lego, just use some "fun" money, not your life savings or retirement funds. Lastly, this should be common sense nowadays, but diversify your investments.
  • cloaked7cloaked7 Member Posts: 1,448
    I agree @tk79. I took use the UCS MF as an example, and we probably shouldn't. It's the holy grail of LEGOS. No one should expect any future set to do as well at it has. Which begs the question, what is the average return on a 'good' LEGO set? Not all sets appreciate. I will say, that few depreciate, which is good, but you don't by any means get 400% on any set you put away and leave unopened.

    So, one consideration is - out difficult is it to pick a winner? Is it easier to pick a winning small set or large set? Because, that is a very important aspect.

    I will say this, although I buy and sell both large and small. I think it is easier to pick a winner from the larger sets. They tend to be more iconic and/or unique. And, since minifigs are a draw now days they tend to have more minis. What do you all think?
  • Farmer_JohnFarmer_John USA - 4,035 Miles from 62 West Wallaby St., Wigan, Lancashire, UKMember Posts: 2,404
    edited February 2012
    In a way, collecting sets to sell is like the stock market. Everybody is looking for the next UCS MF (Google, Apple, etc.). But in my experience, selecting a good stock would probably be easier because I can look at things like NAV, PE ratios, technologies, and even management. I can also easily fit all my stock certificates in a safe deposit box for storage. Stocks represent ownership in a company; collecting sets are ownership of a company's product (that could be reproduced at any time if that company chooses).

    Selecting a good set (large or small) to provide a nice return is more risky for a lot of reasons. The appreciation of sets is based more on emotion than logic (i.e., somebody can't live without that set), and it is more difficult to gauge the future emotions regarding a specific set. I realize that some stock are driven up based on emotions too, but I think those who pay over RRP for a set always have some degree of their emotions involved. I mean...we're talking about molded pieces of plastic...it's a toy.

    While lego sets can be a great investment, one should always try to keep one's perspective. From a sellers point of view, it is important that a prospective buyer be as emotional as possible. At the same time, it is important that the seller be as unemotional as possible.

    JMO
  • turtle1173turtle1173 Member Posts: 230
    I would submit that if you're really buying more than a handful of sets to resell, you should be just buying the proper sized boxes.

    24x16x4" boxes cover a lot of what Lego makes (Battle of Endor for example)
    24x20x4" boxes cover the larger stuff (Fire Brigade for example)

    These boxes are not that expensive when purchased 25 at at time (less than a dollar each), so if you're serious about buying 5 of this and 10 of that, buy some boxes, you'll find you have less shipping damage, much less hassle when packing, and happier customers.
    I would like to buy some of these boxes. Can these really be bought for less than $1 each? I was looking at uline and they seem to be around $1.25 each, then shipping on top of that. Am I looking at the wrong product?
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    They were under a dollar before Christmas, they do an annual sale on boxes the last few weeks of the year, plus they just had a price increase.

    I paid 97 cents each for 24x20x4 and a bit less for 24x16x4 boxes two weeks before Christmas, and that included shipping, but I have an older account that gets free shipping over $300 orders, they don't do that for new accounts anymore.
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,096

    I wouldn't knock Log Cabin, I own 10 of them, I think it will do very well after market... :) Just the right "size" to jump to $90 or so when retired for a quick triple... And $90 is still very affordable for most of the market. It also isn't another "family house" set, I don't see another Log Cabin in the Creator lineup...
    I really like the log cabin... at $30. No way at $90. Despite having some cool alternate builds, It's still just a log cabin at 355 pieces. The light house from '11 will probably appreciate a little better (I rarely see them on store shelves and Amazon runs out of stock on them vs. the Log Cabin). I could be wrong, but I'm also not currently buying Legos as investment but rather to "play" with them. FWIW, I'm a 37 year old male who just came out of a 25 year "dark age".

  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,096
    edited February 2012

    I have always said that the smart investors don't invest in wall street, stock market, mutual funds, 401k, or any of that crap that can also loose you money. The smart invester buy Lego sets, hold onto them for a few years, then sell them at like 500% profit. A MUCH better return on your investment that you will never see in any stocks or bonds. =D

    Removed Signature Block:YC 2/13/12
    As far as toys go, Legos are a pretty good investment (both monetarily and durability) but comparing them to 401k's and stocks?! You're kidding, right? It's still just a toy. I mean you could possibly start a small business buying and re-selling on the side but are you actually thinking that you can get rich re-selling Lego blocks? You're probably one of those sellers on ebay who has current, in circulation sets selling for double what you can buy them on Amazon for.
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    I really like the log cabin... at $30. No way at $90. Despite having some cool alternate builds, It's still just a log cabin at 355 pieces.
    My wife really liked building Log Cabin...

    Her likes and dislikes are a clue to me as to what may jump...

    She also likes the Lighthouse, that one is also on my invest list...
  • gmpirategmpirate Member Posts: 1,654
    Uline has will call in certain areas ;)
  • canuhandle23canuhandle23 Member Posts: 104
    I mean the log cabin should never touch 90. Since their are better creator sets. now the dynamic duo is a cheap set that will touch 100 plus.

    the large sets where the money is these will skyrocket
    tower bridge
    unimog
    diagon alley
    GE since its a corner and will always be important

    then the camper will do well just like the beetle. Even though I like the more expensive sets to hold.
  • JP3804JP3804 Member Posts: 332
    ^ I don't think I would bet on that. I have sold 6 beach houses on amazon @ $100.00 per. I bought them for $ 28.00. You never know. :-)
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