Shopping at LEGO or Amazon?
Please use our links: LEGO.comAmazon
As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.

New Frank Lloyd Wright models by LEGO Architecture founder Adam Reed Tucker

Long-time fans of the LEGO Architecture series are probably familiar with Adam Reed Tucker, since he founded the LEGO Architecture series in 2007 in partnership with The LEGO Group.  Adam designed 16 sets in the LEGO Architecture series, and helped write the book LEGO Architecture: The Visual Guide

I recently noticed (on the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation's website) that Adam designed three nice looking models based on iconic Frank Lloyd Wright buildings which have not been included in the LEGO Architecture series yet...



Martin House (1904, Buffalo, NY), 1961 pieces.



Taliesin West (1937, Scottsdale, AZ), 1763 pieces.



Unity Temple (1908, Oak Park, IL), 912 pieces.


All three models are designed using common LEGO Elements, so you can try to re-create them from the photos if you like.  I personally really like the model of Taliesin West, with it's angular roof-line of alternating white and dark red stripes. 

In full disclosure: All three models are available for sale through his new company The Atom Brick, but the kits do not include LEGO Bricks.  Instead, they come with parts supplied by LOZ, which are 3/4 the size of LEGO bricks, but have the same shapes and proportions.

Because I love seeing beautiful Architecture models, I reached out to Adam to learn a lot more about the models, his passion for Architecture, and his decision to create a new company in order to create these sets.  I interviewed Adam and wrote an article about these models on my website—It's an interesting read for anyone who loves the LEGO Architecture series like I do!

Sincerely,
—Tom Alphin


LINK TO ARTICLE: brickarchitect.com/2020/adam-reed-tucker-the-atom-brick/



P.S.  I definitely have mixed feelings that these nice looking models aren't available with LEGO Bricks.  What do you think of the models?

stluxLegoDad42Jackad7thenosKungFuKennyklintonMynattthedingman5M1J0Eew027

Comments

  • Gooker1Gooker1 Member Posts: 598
    They're really well done, but if it's not Lego, I don't think I can jump on it.
    KungFuKennyM1J0E
  • datsunrobbiedatsunrobbie West Haven , CTMember Posts: 1,555
    I decided to check out the LOZ website, lozshop.com, and was not disappointed. The attempt at translation to English reminds me of Datsun repair manuals from the 1960s, quite hilarious. A few sets that look like they are rip-offs of LEGO designs, but a lot of sets don't. There were a few Disney items, makes me wonder if they are getting licenses or just waiting for The Mouse to come after them...
    Bumblepants
  • henrysunsethenrysunset Member Posts: 242
    Gooker1 said:
    They're really well done, but if it's not Lego, I don't think I can jump on it.
    I agree that the models look good, and should have a chance to build one of them soon.

    I suspect some folks will end up building the models using LEGO parts from their own collections.  I'm not sure if that will be possible for all three models, though... They might require parts that don't come in a particular color.
  • M1J0EM1J0E Calgary, ABMember Posts: 637
    Wow are these ever great looking models!  But I’ll be the next one to say because they’re not Lego, I may not get to them.  What I actually honestly hope is their licensing with FLW doesn’t preclude more actual Lego FLW sets in the future.  Robie house, Fallingwater, the architecture houses (even the non FLW ones) are some of the best the theme has.
    henrysunset
  • henrysunsethenrysunset Member Posts: 242
    M1J0E said:
    What I actually honestly hope is their licensing with FLW doesn’t preclude more actual Lego FLW sets in the future. 

    I do not know if their licensing agreement with the FLW Foundation is an exclusive agreement.  I also do not know if the FLW Foundation has exclusive right to the likeness of these buildings—it's entirely possible that you do not need a license to build a model based on those buildings.
  • vanvonfullvanvonfull washingtonMember Posts: 67
    I love my FLW sets and these look great but I’m disappointed to see that the relationship between Lego & the foundation has ended. I’m still kicking myself for not buying fallingwater from his office in Oak Park when I had the chance a few years ago. 

    If these get turned into buyable instructions, I’ll pursue. 

     Thanks for the news. 

    henrysunset
  • AstrobricksAstrobricks Minnesota, USMember Posts: 2,877
    M1J0E said:
    What I actually honestly hope is their licensing with FLW doesn’t preclude more actual Lego FLW sets in the future. 

    I do not know if their licensing agreement with the FLW Foundation is an exclusive agreement.  I also do not know if the FLW Foundation has exclusive right to the likeness of these buildings—it's entirely possible that you do not need a license to build a model based on those buildings.
    You don’t need a license to build a model based on his (or anyone’s) buildings. To sell a model based on them, you likely do. To sell instructions? Not sure.
  • autolycusautolycus US-SEMember Posts: 299
    In the US, building designs could not be copyrighted until 1990. FLW’s buildings themselves are not protected. However, use of his name, and almost certainly the names of his designs, is protected under other IP law (notably trademark and protection of his “likeness”). So anybody could sell a house (or model of a house) that looked exactly like Fallingwater, as long as they don’t call it “Fallingwater” or use Frank Lloyd Wright’s name anywhere.
    henrysunsetstlux
  • henrysunsethenrysunset Member Posts: 242

    I just posted a review of the Unity Temple set at brickarchitect.com which talks about both the set design, and the tiny LOZ bricks.  Here are some highlights...

    Set Design:

    In general, the model is well designed, and comparable to sets in the Architecture series.  The closest comparison is the Imperial Hotel, which employs similar building techniques even tough the building is from a later transitional period in his "prairie style" of architecture.

    I did notice some illegal building techniques, and some steps of the instruction booklet which could have been made clearer.  I also disliked the building technique used for the trees (which was made worse by some tolerance issues on the tiny LOZ bricks.)


    LOZ Bricks:

    My first impression of the LOZ bricks was twofold: They are better quality than I expected, and they are really tiny (see calculations above...)

    Once I started building, I did discover a few mounds which were of inconsistent quality, and about three parts which had one sharper edge than I would have liked to see.

    I do think that the bricks are too small for the intricate building techniques which are common in the Architecture series.  Stacking 1x1 elements and ensuring that they are aligned correctly was time consuming and miserable at times.  (It's already difficult enough with larger LEGO-sized pieces!)  The smaller size is an interesting novelty at first, but in practice the small size is more frustrating than the minor quality issues I encountered.


    ʀᴇᴠɪᴇᴡ: Unity Temple (The Atom Brick)


    Sincerely,
    —Tom Alphin


    P.S. What do you think of the set design—Is it something you are interested in adding to your collection?   Do you have any further questions about the set or the LOZ bricks?

    P.S.S. Review of Taliesin West coming soon!

    thedingman5tomahawker
Sign In or Register to comment.

Shopping at LEGO.com or Amazon?

Please use our links: LEGO.com Amazon

Recent discussions Categories Privacy Policy

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Brickset.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, the Amazon.com.ca, Inc. Associates Program and the Amazon EU Associates Programme, which are affiliate advertising programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.

As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.