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Lightailing or Briksmax difference?

lee1980lee1980 Bristol, UKMember Posts: 39
edited January 6 in Buying & Selling Topics
After some lights for Stranger things set and maybe other sets.  Lightailing site seems to have Briksmax to but can not see a difference only Briksmax is more expensive, all seem to be on amazon uk to. 
Or are there better out there?
Seen elegant bricks that sell Light my bricks but they are way more expensive to.

Comments

  • lee1980lee1980 Bristol, UKMember Posts: 39
    Anyone? or is it as most things a case of you get what you pay for, as set for ST set ranges from £50 to £120 or so from above sites and amazon etc.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 18,142
    I don't have any experience of either so cannot comment on the quality. However, I buy a lot of cheap electronics from China and often you do not get what you pay for. The cheap stuff is usually just as good as the expensive. Although they both look expensive for what you get. I guess it depends on whether you are confident to do a bit of soldering yourself or not. If you are, then I'd buy the components and build your own. If not, go for a kit.

  • JAWSJAWS UKMember Posts: 78
    Not 100% sure as I have a couple of each but have found the difference between them that lightailing are pre fitted in to lego bricks and briksmax are not you stick them to the lego build with adhesive pads (although you do get some lego pieces to stick the lights to yourself), you can also add flashing lights with briksmax, lightailing are static lights only.
    bandit778
  • lee1980lee1980 Bristol, UKMember Posts: 39
    Thanks both, so there is a difference, strange how on Lightailing sight I think it was show both theres and Briksmax but no where can I find it says difference. 
    I will have to look further, have soldered but not on this scale or so small, can imagine won't do so well at all. 
  • CyberdragonCyberdragon Maryland, U.S.AMember Posts: 412
    I've tried microsoldering with grain of rice/wheat bulbs before (which you can also use) and yes, tiny wires are fiddly (especially with my fat iron I normally use on old circuit boards and tube stuff), but with either LEDs or bulbs you'll get the hang of it eventually (you may have to redo the joints several times if the light doesn't come on). You won't be able to use those hair thin wires and tiny SMD leds that fit under studs unless you are really good and have a microsoldering pencil and magnifier station/microscope, but with some practice you can make lights for some stuff.

    Here's a selection of stuff I practice microsoldering with.



    My first sucess, giving Hermione a necklace (IDK why, but just thought an easy start was with a minifig).


    LittleLoriAddicted2OxygencatwranglerM1J0E
  • msandersmsanders Member Posts: 928
    I commented some time ago on another thread my experience with Lightailing vs Light my bricks. I had many issues with broken sections of lights with Lightailing. They eventually replaced these lights but it took a month or so to get the replacements. They only responded to my messages once I left a negative review on their website - which was not published by the way! They moderate their reviews.

    Light my bricks is more expensive but the lights are much better quality and much more robust - the connections and wiring are much more solid. They are more expensive but I will only buy from them now. 

    It really depends whether you want the exact lighting set-up as per the kit. You can buy the cheaper versions of lights, but expect that possibly one or 2 light sections may not work, but overall, the model will be lit up nicely (but not entirely as per the pictures). 

    In general though for all of these lights, there is a lot of fiddly work to install the wires under bricks, through walls etc etc. Then sometimes the wires are not particularly well hidden, the bricks do not clutch very well because of wires, plus you have the battery box to put somewhere in your model. Also, I found the instructions difficult to follow with sometimes not very good photos.

    Once done, they look great on display but you won`t really be able to play with the models afterwards - I only mention that because I got the Disney Castle kit and it looks lovely but my kids used to enjoy playing with the model, but there are so many wires about and battery boxes this is almost impossible. Combine that will the fact that the connections are very fragile, I would be worried that the kids break the lights. 
    LittleLoriAddicted2Oxygencatwrangler
  • CyberdragonCyberdragon Maryland, U.S.AMember Posts: 412
    edited January 9
    I used to light up my technic sets with LEDs long before I knew how to solder with just twisted wires. It looked like spaghetti but I would still play with them. But I also used alot thicker telephone wire (24 gauge solid core) and not that fragile wispy stuff you get with kits. Of course, with technic, there are alot of holes and spaces to put LEDs and thicker, more robust wire than in system. Also, AC or USB power adaptors are a good idea for stationary sets to eliminate batteries.
    LittleLori
  • lee1980lee1980 Bristol, UKMember Posts: 39
    Thanks all for replies sort of info I was after.  I think I will best just waiting until get light my bricks from elegant bricks here in UK.  Though imagine it would of been easier to install during build of stranger things to! 
    Would be for display on shelf with all mine no play really, would look to ac power or a decent power bank.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 18,142
    I've tried microsoldering with grain of rice/wheat bulbs before (which you can also use) and yes, tiny wires are fiddly (especially with my fat iron I normally use on old circuit boards and tube stuff), but with either LEDs or bulbs you'll get the hang of it eventually (you may have to redo the joints several times if the light doesn't come on).

    Yeah, once you get the hang of it then it is not too bad. Although you can buy pre-soldered / connected micro LEDs. I bought a load a couple of years ago for about 20p / 25c a piece. Although more expensive than the individual components, they were worth it based on how much time I was spending trying to solder them myself at the time.

    The good thing about the thin wire is that you can hide it between bricks within a wall and you barely notice it. Although as mentioned above, if using a technic model, then often you can run thicker wire though the holes. Sometimes in MOCs I purposely use technic bricks to create and hide channels to pass wires through.
    LittleLori
  • msandersmsanders Member Posts: 928
    lee1980 said:
    Thanks all for replies sort of info I was after.  I think I will best just waiting until get light my bricks from elegant bricks here in UK.  Though imagine it would of been easier to install during build of stranger things to! 
    Would be for display on shelf with all mine no play really, would look to ac power or a decent power bank.
    Someone posted on another thread the lights from Lightailing for a modular. Worth reading that because they like the quality so my comments may just be specific for my experience. 
  • lee1980lee1980 Bristol, UKMember Posts: 39
    Will do a search, though i must not spend to much more on lego yet lol, she will sure to notice lights to!
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