Target now selling imitation Lego

shikadishikadi TRU AlumniMember Posts: 79
edited March 25 in Everything else LEGO
Found in the dollar section. Made in China.

Wouldn't TLG have a problem with this when they pay for a whole lot of space in Target stores for their products? How is this allowed to happen?



LEGOFan2The_Stud

Comments

  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,779
    shikadi said:

    Wouldn't TLG have a problem with this when they pay for a whole lot of space in Target stores for their products? How is this allowed to happen?

    Becuase Target think some of their customers would be after buying cheap bricks. It is not illegal, and they sell other brands such as Mega Bloks / Construx, so I don't see the problem with these. LEGO have clearly not got a deal with them where they sell LEGO exclusively.
    AstrobricksLEGOFan2gmonkey76Baby_YodamadforLEGOThe_StuddatsunrobbieRecce
  • Baby_YodaBaby_Yoda The world's backsideMember Posts: 1,225
    They're not designed to mislead, like Lepin, for example. It's not fake Lego, it's just another brand of building blocks.
    madforLEGOstluxThe_Studshikadidatsunrobbiegmonkey76
  • oldtodd33oldtodd33 Denver 4800 miles to BillundMember Posts: 2,416
    Kind of makes you wonder about the manufacturer though. Fifty pieces for a dollar, Target can't be paying more than 50 cents per package. 
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,779
    Although made in China (like some LEGO also is), the company Blok Tech is Canadian. These are also sold in many UK supermarkets.

    For example:

    1000 pieces for £10.

    I imagine they meet all safety laws to be sold in such major stores.
  • daewoodaewoo TexasMember Posts: 321
    One of the most frequent complaints I hear about Lego is the price.  I know many people who would love to get their kids into Lego but are not willing to pay what Lego wants.  Target (and other retailers) know this and carry similar products to Lego that are not as expensive.  It's a win/win.
  • truck730truck730 Member Posts: 214
    Bias to lego but other toy brick makers don't stick together -either loose or hard to put together and finish isn't any better with gaps  or colour mismatch ,again bias to lego but it's a better product
    560HeliportSumoLego
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,907
    People bought Go-Bots.  They got exactly what they paid for.  They did not get a Transformer, that's for sure.
    gmonkey76SprinkleOtter
  • bookmumbookmum londonMember Posts: 1,196
    Those bricks look like the ones sold under the block tech name in the UK - which is the same stuff that sold in some UK retailers under an 'own brand' name. In the retailer Wilkos it is called Blox. As an alternative (and cheaper) brand it is perfectly fine and without these alternatives some children would never get the chance to play with 'Lego'. I don't see a problem with it. In many UK retailers these alternatives are sold alongside Lego and it causes no problems at all. 
    datsunrobbie
  • klintonklinton CanadaMember Posts: 550
    SumoLego said:
    People bought Go-Bots.  They got exactly what they paid for.  They did not get a Transformer, that's for sure.
    Except that Transformers were actually the 'clone brand' in this case, being cobbled together by Hasbro from existing Japanese products a year after GoBots hit store shelves. 

    ...maybe Lepin is actually the superior product? :p
    pharmjodBaby_YodaPyrobugSteveG
  • dehnehsudehnehsu Bay Area, Calif.Member Posts: 169
    edited March 29
    Looks like the same stuff they sell at Dollar Tree.
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,907
    klinton said:
    Except that Transformers were actually the 'clone brand' in this case, being cobbled together by Hasbro from existing Japanese products a year after GoBots hit store shelves.
    Technicalities aside - just because Go-Bots made it to market first doesn't make Transformers a 'clone'.  

    Nobody wants Go-Bots or likes them.  They were not the premium product, which was my point.
    SprinkleOtter
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,731
    edited March 29
    SumoLego said:
    klinton said:
    Except that Transformers were actually the 'clone brand' in this case, being cobbled together by Hasbro from existing Japanese products a year after GoBots hit store shelves.
    Technicalities aside - just because Go-Bots made it to market first doesn't make Transformers a 'clone'.  

    Nobody wants Go-Bots or likes them.  They were not the premium product, which was my point.
    I don't think I'm allowed to post it, but there was a great Robot Chicken bit on this...

    Edit: There's actually a few. I was referencing the Zybots one.
    SumoLegoklintongmonkey76SteveG
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,779
    The clone brands are also a great source for large baseplates in colours that LEGO have never done, or haven't done for a long time.
    LittleLori
  • CyberdragonCyberdragon Maryland, U.S.AMember Posts: 378
    I saw a bin of fake (preassembled) minifigs at my Target. Isn't that illegal due to patent/copyright?
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,907
    edited March 29
    I saw a bin of fake (preassembled) minifigs at my Target. Isn't that illegal due to patent/copyright?
    Strictly speaking, no. 

    Unless LEGO can demonstrate that there is an infringement and that LEGO has suffered a monetizable amount of damages.  My guess is that the competing product you see at Target is sufficiently different so as to be discernable by a reasonable consumer.  Although, admittedly, I'm not up on my copyright law post-2004.
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