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Buying LEGO on eBay

245

Comments

  • RennyRenny USAMember Posts: 1,143
    Depends on the return policy stated on the auction. Most Sellers that accept returns indicate the buyer pays the return shipping. I believe the same applies if you go through with the buyer protection route.
  • UKtsumiUKtsumi Member Posts: 622
    The buyer doesnt accept returns. But, if the item is not as described??? If I have to pay to return it I probably will, as I dont want this "box of rubbish" anywhere near my lovely Lego.
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    ^ It comes down to how hard you want to push it.

    If the seller sent me junk, I'd expect him/her to pay return shipping.

    If they don't, I'd go the buyer protection route, plus negative feedback, dings their account twice that way.

    I always give a seller the chance to make it right, everyone makes mistakes, but if a seller tells me to piss off, then all bets are off.
  • UKtsumiUKtsumi Member Posts: 622
    I sent them a polite email, saying that I was unhappy with the "lego", I do understand that some people don't know the difference between brands and it could have been an honest mistake, but the seller was really narky with me calling ME a liar! They have 100% feedback so far and maybe they dont quite realize how negative feedback stands out !
    Oh well,,,, I really should stop buying 2nd hand lego!!!
  • RennyRenny USAMember Posts: 1,143
    edited August 2012
    Hope it works out for you. I've had 2 terrible experiences purchasing used sets (1 was missing a bunch of pieces, had a lot of substitutions and was missing stickers. The other looked like it had been baking in the sun for a good while and also home to a couple of spiders...seriously...webs, leaves and dead bugs everywhere). Images provided in the auctions were of the box only and the deals were too good to pass up...well now I know that I should have passed them up.

    I will gladly pay a higher cost and buy new to avoid that mess again.
  • UKtsumiUKtsumi Member Posts: 622
    thanks , will try and avoid used lego in future, lesson learnt!
  • AFFOL_Shellz_BellzAFFOL_Shellz_Bellz Member Posts: 1,263
    No need to avoid used Lego, just make sure there are pictures of the actual Lego, and always ask questions. If the item isn't satisfactory be sure to tell the seller exactly what your issue is. Both ebay and paypal have buyer protection and you should feel free to use it. Never ship the item back to the seller if you are disputing it because you'll have lost your evidence.
  • UKtsumiUKtsumi Member Posts: 622
    I am trying to be reasonable with the seller .... this is a part of their response
    .."..All my lego Was original lego this 1/2 not is a lie i my self a collector only bought lego what's the point of other versions as the don't connect together correctly and i spent alot of money on it".....
    ....,,,,,,,sighs,,,,,,
    --- why cant some people just admit their mistakes!!!
  • UKtsumiUKtsumi Member Posts: 622
    'Ive been had, now she says this -------

    "Im far from daft i no exactly what my item contained and i won't accept it back tampared altered or swapped it was 100% genuine when it left here."

    so even if I send it back , Im not going to get my refund.... :(



  • TyoSoloTyoSolo Member Posts: 539
    ^ Or use English in their e-mails.

    I buy a lot of used stuff. One of the things I have come to expect is that when a set is advertised as 100% complete, expect parts to be missing or substituted, and bid accordingly. If someone advertises something as "mint", expect it to have been in played with condition.

    The kind of people that sell the "bargain" sets on eBay are usually parents, or not fans. They don't have the same idea as us when it comes to condition and completeness.

    One of my close friends (who suffers from collector OCD also, but for other things) has started advertising his sets he has been offloading as 110% complete, and adding a couple of extras to emphasise the fact that they are actually complete sets.
  • UKtsumiUKtsumi Member Posts: 622
    I knew not to expect it 100% , but at just over 50% lego , and the 3 baseboards all cracked, and taped together, I feel justified in complaining.
    It cost me £10 post, and will cost me £10 post to send it back to get my refund, meaning I'm £20 out of pocket!(and no guarantees i will get the rest back) not a fortune but I just feel cheated!

    They are insisting i recieved a "bargain", and am convinced that I am trying to con them?????

    No prizes for this sellers customer services. !!
  • LegofanscottLegofanscott Member Posts: 622
    edited August 2012
    UKtsumi said:

    'Ive been had, now she says this -------

    "Im far from daft i no exactly what my item contained and i won't accept it back tampared altered or swapped it was 100% genuine when it left here."

    so even if I send it back , Im not going to get my refund.... :(



    UKtsumi said:

    I am trying to be reasonable with the seller .... this is a part of their response
    .."..All my lego Was original lego this 1/2 not is a lie i my self a collector only bought lego what's the point of other versions as the don't connect together correctly and i spent alot of money on it".....
    ....,,,,,,,sighs,,,,,,
    --- why cant some people just admit their mistakes!!!

    She's not daft yet she can't seem to even put a coherent sentence together LOL
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    Open a eBay Buyer Protection Claim and let them sort it out.

    If you ship a package back to the seller, eBay will refund your money.
  • LegofanscottLegofanscott Member Posts: 622

    Open a eBay Buyer Protection Claim and let them sort it out.

    If you ship a package back to the seller, eBay will refund your money.

    What LFT said :)

    Fortunately ebay tends to favour the buyer most of the time
  • UKtsumiUKtsumi Member Posts: 622
    thank you for that, will call ebay in the morning.
  • lulwutlulwut Member Posts: 416
    edited August 2012
    Buyer pays shipping back, they don't get credit for it. I don't ever recall paypal ever providing prepaid postage unless the seller created one.

  • y2joshy2josh Member Posts: 2,002
    ^If you open an 'Item Not As Described' case and win, eBay will either refund you outright and sort things out with the seller, or have the seller pay the return shipping. This just seems like good business, though. If I sell something and someone wants to return it due to buyer's remorse, I'm happy to take it back as long as it's in the original condition and they pay return shipping. If it's due to my error (or the carrier's, in some cases), I'll cover the return shipping myself.
  • UKtsumiUKtsumi Member Posts: 622
    looks like i have to pay return shipping.. and will be refunded on the return - just wondering will I get refunded for the original shipping, it all seems unfair to me as the seller is acting like I "changed my mind", rather than them selling me a box of half megablocks and broken pieces.
  • drdavewatforddrdavewatford Hertfordshire, UKAdministrator Posts: 6,258
    I'd just open a dispute with eBay and leave some appropriate feedback for the seller....
  • monkeyhangermonkeyhanger Member Posts: 2,837
    You shouldn't have to be out of pocket for shipping on a "not as described" transaction - chase through ebay.
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    ^ Actually, as insane as it sounds, with eBay's buyer protection, you generally have to pay for return shipping yourself, even for "not as described" items.

    Nuts, isn't it?
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,806
    If the seller insists it was 100% Lego when sent, and what you got is not, then I'd ask the seller where your package is. As the one you received is not 100% genuine Lego, it cannot be the one the seller sent. So they still owe you a parcel.
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409
    CCC said:

    If the seller insists it was 100% Lego when sent, and what you got is not, then I'd ask the seller where your package is. As the one you received is not 100% genuine Lego, it cannot be the one the seller sent. So they still owe you a parcel.

    :) While I agree with that thought, it won't help much since the seller has tracking showing it was delivered.

    But yes, it sucks when such things happen.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,806
    I missed the tracking part. So all you can do is make a paypal complaint, return at your expense (with tracking) and leave them negative feedback.
  • RedbullgivesuwindRedbullgivesuwind Brickset's Secret HeadquatersMember Posts: 1,767
    The UK law really needs updating on this as currently the only real recourse if you have been burned is ebays buyer protection. Other than that as long as its described you dont have much protection. So she is technically within her rights to ask for you to pay for returns. The only way is if its a store or someone whose main income is from ebay then they are bound by statutory laws. Its a ludicrous position with the size of ebay now.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,806
    ^ Surely it is not down to the size of eBay, but the size of the seller though. If the seller is selling second hand, you get no recourse, apart from PayPal protection. Do you think the law should make small second hand sellers accept returns for any reason, like businesses?
  • FatMattFatMatt USMember Posts: 502
    I buy a lot of lots of used Lego off Ebay. On occasion, I have had lots that were far from as described, and the seller refuses to refund. I open a case stating I want a full refund and return shipping paid for. Even if the seller won't cover return shipping, Ebay has always given me a prepaid label for shipping. Some deals are too good to pass up on, but the safest bet is a sellers track record. Check their completed listings and feedback to see if they sell a lot of used Lego, 100% complete sets, etc. Feedback doesn't lie. Occasionally I make a mistake when selling something, but in the event it is my fault, I always accept the return and pay for the return shipping as I except from any seller though it doesn't always work that way.
  • RedbullgivesuwindRedbullgivesuwind Brickset's Secret HeadquatersMember Posts: 1,767
    edited November 2012
    I was casting around on ebay for some parts for the sail barge and cane across one that at the moment seemed quiet low with no one meeting the reserve; and has about 5 or 6 days to run. But the seller has not listed the reserve price.

    So I cant be bothered to try an play a guessing game as to what is the reserve. Therefore I shoot him off an email asking what it is and get this reply:

    'Hi I am aware that this is a collectors item. So I had decided to keep the reserve secret. Happy bidding!'

    Am I right to think if you really want to sell it you would list it. And that some how the reserve is going to be ludicrisly high. Is it just me or is this a daft response.
  • OldfanOldfan Chicagoland, IL, USAMember Posts: 621
    My strategy for reserve auctions, is to bid the price that I'm willing to pay. If it meets the reserve, fine. If not, and no one outbids me, then the auction ends and the seller has some information on what others are willing to pay for their particular item...

    If I really really really want that item, I might try to communicate with the seller and push a little, but in my experience the same item will come around again for auction eventually...
  • cheshirecatcheshirecat Member Posts: 5,332
    How does ebay work with this, if youre the only bidder and bid over the reserve will it just take your bid up to it?

    I dont see it as a particularly silly response, assuming the above you could just bid up towards what you think is sensible in small increments until the reserve is met or it goes above what you want to pay, whichever is less.
  • Pacific493Pacific493 Member Posts: 379
    IMHO it's just shortsighted. I don't bother bidding on auctions with a reserve unless the seller will disclose what the reserve price is.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,806
    I place a bid. If it is above the reserve, you get it. If not, I move on.
    OldfanCapnRex101
  • cheshirecatcheshirecat Member Posts: 5,332
    edited November 2012
    As far as i can tell most real auctions, other than real estate, dont use published reserves. Dont see whats shortsighted or silly about it.
  • mressinmressin Lego City... erm LondonMember Posts: 843
    I don't quite understand the concept of "reserve" at all. If the seller has a minimum price under which he won't sell the item, why not make that the starting bid? Why does eBay allow people to place a starting bid below the minimum price under which the seller won't sell the item?
  • luckyrussluckyruss UKMember Posts: 872
    ^ again this seems quite common in other auctions, for automobiles etc. They start with a low bid in the room, I presume to get people interested and competing with each other to get the price moving. From what I have seen the reserve isn't always disclosed in this environment - even at the end if the final bid price is below it. Obviously if it's met then it's somewhat academic.

    I have however seen the auctioneer signalling to the high bidder if they are just a bit below the reserve price to come and have a conversation (where I presume some element of negotiation can take place).

    This point about generating interest still seems to hold on ebay. If it has an expensive start price it just gets ignored. If it starts at 99p then you might be interested; there are always those auctions, and bidders, where when you get involved there is the risk that you end up paying more than you thought you would.

    You do see quite a few ebay items (including Lego) that go unsold at a given (high) price, then relisted at a lower price and bid up above the level at which they previously didn't sell.
  • luckyrussluckyruss UKMember Posts: 872
    @cheshirecat, my understanding on ebay is that if the reserve is £50 and you bid £40, then it says £40 but reserve not met, if you bid £60 then your bid will be live at £50 and the reserve issue falls away.
  • AmberylAmberyl Member Posts: 193
    For the seller, it's a form of gamesmanship. Many buyers sort auctions by 'Price+Shipping:Lowest First', so if you set a very low minimum bid, you'll make your auction look more attractive -- but the reserve price will ensure you're not selling your item for less than you want for it.

    Personally, I hate reserve-price auctions; I would much rather see a minimum bid.
  • cheshirecatcheshirecat Member Posts: 5,332
    ^ thats what i assumed, so theres no real issue here. just bid what you are willing to pay, in small installments if you want.
  • thorniethornie Member Posts: 245
    Don't worry about reserve prices. Bid what you are willing to pay, and if you are lucky you might get a second chance offer if the auction ended and the reserve was not met.
    Oldfan
  • LegoFanTexasLegoFanTexas TexasMember Posts: 8,409

    As far as i can tell most real auctions, other than real estate, dont use published reserves. Dont see whats shortsighted or silly about it.

    Yes, but they are also over in a few minutes, and you're there to bid on multiple similar lots in a short period of time, and each auction ends before the next one starts.

    On eBay, auctions often last for a week, many are running at the same time, and you don't know if you'll win this one or that one so it makes it hard to pick the one to bid on.

    Different situation completely. I have long since stopped bidding on auctions in general on eBay. If I want something, I find one on buy-it-now.

    When I sell, I have tried a few auctions, but in general I prefer selling with buy-it-now as well.
    Redbullgivesuwindsipmart242Pitfall69GothamConstructionCo
  • RedbullgivesuwindRedbullgivesuwind Brickset's Secret HeadquatersMember Posts: 1,767
    @Cheshirecat I did think about doing that but as id have to do this on my phone, and it would be the same on a pc, im not sure if I can be bothered to sit there doing small increases. If its say 200 then ill be there for ages.

    If he has an idea of what he wants to sell it for just list it as that or say. It would be a lot quicker and better for buyers.
  • dragonhawkdragonhawk USMember Posts: 633
    edited November 2012
    The seller paid extra for having a reserved price. It is at their discretion to disclose it or not. So no, it is not the silliest eBay response.

    I personally do not bid on items with reserve as I see it as another hurdle for my bid. As a buyer, I see it as the seller bidding against me. I am not willing to play guess the minimum bid game (what reserve price is) and then have the possibility of being outbid by other buyers. I would rather have the seller tell me how much the minimum they are willing to take for the item (ie initial price point). I also tend to just buy the item when they have reasonable buy it now prices.

    Bidding what you are willing to pay is the best advice. Put the maximum of what you are willing to pay and let eBay takes care of the increments. Optional: come back 5 minutes before the auction ends and make small adjustment if necessary.
    OldfanRedbullgivesuwind
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 9,351
    I have tried listing auctions with reserves in the past.
    for a bit it was OK, then I realized you just do not get the bidders you want. Many bidders do not want to waste their time bidding or 'fighting' for something if the reserve is not met and I received far more bids without reserve. True to risk not selling it for what you want, but that is like any other auction.
    I think the other thing is that they think it may be cheaper to set an auction to start a .01 and reserve it than setting it at 50 dollars for example, but I think after the reserve fees you are not really saving much. To each their own I guess.
    Like others have said, what a set dollar amount for it? Put it on Buy it now, or set the starting bid at what you want, otherwise roll the dice.
  • gmpirategmpirate Member Posts: 1,654
    There's nothing wrong with him doing a reserve, but I do think his response was "silly". Just say you do not wish to disclose the reserve.

    The reserve is there to protect himself while still allowing the possibility of a bidding war taking it higher. To each their own, but I much prefer "Buy-it-now"'s for both buying and selling.
  • tedwardtedward CanadaMember Posts: 163
    The whole concept of "reserve" price is absurd whether on eBay or at a live auction. Sure it is a regular feature and has been for a long time and sure they can offer it however they like but frankly they are wasting my time and that of anyone else but not simply starting at their minimum acceptable price.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,806
    luckyruss said:

    @cheshirecat, my understanding on ebay is that if the reserve is £50 and you bid £40, then it says £40 but reserve not met, if you bid £60 then your bid will be live at £50 and the reserve issue falls away.

    Is that right? It used to be that if you bid £40, then it would show either the starting price if you are the only bidder, or the second highest bid plus one increment.

    Thus if you bid £49.99 and no-one else bid, then the seller would not know how close you were, just that you were under his reserve price. But then reserve auctions are so infrequent these days, I don't think I have bid on one for a number of years.
  • dragonhawkdragonhawk USMember Posts: 633
    ^ CCC is correct and those are the other disadvantages of using reserve price.
    As buyer, if no one else bid, then you are forever stuck in the initial/lowest price without the ability to reach the reserved price.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,806
    ^ Yeah, the seller doesn't know how close you were to his valuation, and so may not bother listing again. It does seem silly that they have not come up with some "discussion" to get the item sold, like often happens at real auctions if close to the reserve. Of course, if a seller wants to he can just disclose the reserve.

    I guess the fact that ebay have not done anything to help out get a sale (and thus the fees) is that not many auctions end like that and it is not worth them bothering with implementing it or confusing the bidding process even more.
  • RedbullgivesuwindRedbullgivesuwind Brickset's Secret HeadquatersMember Posts: 1,767
    ^agreed it maybe to much hassel or people do it outside of ebay. As a seller you can see who is bidding so you can contact them.

    What the seller was hoping for was to force people to bid high for it. I think. Its just annoying if he had told me I would have put a bid in. Rather than force me to play a guessing game.
  • drdavewatforddrdavewatford Hertfordshire, UKAdministrator Posts: 6,258
    Like other respondents on here I don't bother bidding on items with a reserve - it's an irritating waste of my time to 'win' an auction only to find that the winning bid was below the reserve and nobody wins.

    If you want to guard against a winning bid that's too low then set a minimum price - at least that way everybody knows where they stand.

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