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The Case of the Yellowing White Bricks

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Comments

  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,374
    I've used UV light and that didn't do anything near what just placing the parts outside in sunlight. It may be the combination of electromagnetic radiation, infrared and UV that does the trick than just using UV alone. 

    as @CCC said; when HP heats up, it degrades the solution and releases oxygen. I know when it's time to take my parts out from the sun based on all the oxygen bubbles that have formed all over my parts.
  • GomjabaGomjaba UKMember Posts: 20
    Problem is - we barely know how to spell sun in the UK ... we still got 12 degrees here and had like 5 minutes sunshine .. might just park the project until that kicks up or just be more ... patient :) 
    SprinkleOtter
  • dmcc0dmcc0 Nae far fae AberdeenMember Posts: 737
    We've got plenty of sun at the moment, it's just not very warm :(  Given that I had to defrost my car yesterday morning, probably not optimal conditions for putting HP out in the sun, more likely to freeze over rather than warm up.
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