Please refrain from posting animated GIFs, memes, joke videos and so on in discussions other than those in the off topic area.

Dismiss this message to confirm your acceptance of this additional forum term of use.

General Overwatch Discussion

245

Comments

  • Baby_YodaBaby_Yoda The world's backsideMember Posts: 1,078
    edited August 2018
    At least the price points further support the notion that it's a line of playsets, although I think it's practically a guarantee at this point that we'll get Brickheadz from it at some point.
  • NicksBricksNicksBricks United StatesMember Posts: 197
    edited August 2018
    Didn't see this posted on the forum yet. The official Overwatch Twitter account showed this off at Gamescom. I'm assuming this confirms a few of the characters that will be coming. I can make out Mercy, Genji, Soldier 76 and McCree.


    Baby_Yoda
  • Penkid11Penkid11 Member Posts: 775
    edited August 2018
    Didn't see this posted on the forum yet. The official Overwatch Twitter account showed this off at Gamescom. I'm assuming this confirms a few of the characters that will be coming. I can make out Mercy, Genji, Soldier 76 and McCree.
    The other two are Widowmaker and Reinhardt.
  • Baby_YodaBaby_Yoda The world's backsideMember Posts: 1,078
    ^^ It was mentioned a while ago on the main site. It's safe to say, then, that at this point we'll be getting Tracer, Genji, Widowmaker, Reinhardt, Mercy, Soldier 76 and McCree. The backgrounds in the video could also be potential playsets. Still nothing confirmed, though...
  • Pumpkin_3CK5Pumpkin_3CK5 CaliforniaMember Posts: 761
    ^I hope not that's just another rocket ship! Lol I'd rather get the giant truck used in Temple of Anubis. Would be cool to also get the Temple itself.
  • Baby_YodaBaby_Yoda The world's backsideMember Posts: 1,078
    ^ Remember when they rejected every Lego Ideas project and cited "similarity to upcoming sets" as one of their reasons? They weren't talking about Cloud City. They meant the Saturn V Launch Tower. ;)
    Although a rocket launch tower done as a playset would be pretty fun and make an enticing display, it'd be highly unlikely, so I think you're safe for now.
  • Baby_YodaBaby_Yoda The world's backsideMember Posts: 1,078
    Another update on Lego Overwatch: the sub-site now curiously displays an image of Lego bananas. I can't think of any correlation between Overwatch and bananas, except for that one time someone used bananas to play instead of a controller. To the regulars, is there something I'm missing?
    https://www.lego.com/en-us/themes/overwatch
  • HanzoHanzo VAMember Posts: 607
    I don't play it but isn't there a gorilla character?
  • Pumpkin_3CK5Pumpkin_3CK5 CaliforniaMember Posts: 761
    edited October 2018
    Courtesy of Polygon:https://www.polygon.com/2018/10/2/17928380/overwatch-lego-line-tracer-heroes

    @Baby_Yoda Winston likes peanut butter and bananas lol
  • Baby_YodaBaby_Yoda The world's backsideMember Posts: 1,078
    Ah, cool, that's seven confirmed characters and one revealed minifigure then. I'd bet on set reveals sometime in the next month.
  • LegolisLegolis Leeds, UKMember Posts: 219
    edited October 2018
    My husband and 5 year old daughter were very excited by this last night. Tracer looks pretty much as you'd expect. I think these sets will end up being a big hit in our house. 

    Also the bananas update is alluding to the character Winston, he's a talking Gorilla. That's a jar of peanut butter (his favourite food)... Sometimes I wonder how clever I could have been if I didn't store this much useless information in my head. :D


    FowlerBricksMaffyDBaby_Yoda
  • FauchFauch FranceMember Posts: 2,230
    so 5 years old girls play FPS now?
  • Toc13Toc13 Member Posts: 1,014
    ^ & probably kick your arse at it :-P
    Ayliffepharmjodgmonkey76Baby_YodaHanzosid3windr
  • LegolisLegolis Leeds, UKMember Posts: 219
    Haha, no not really, her Dad lets her run around in training mode. She likes switching between characters, jumping between platforms and seeing what the characters abilities are. But she knew well enough to shout "yay that's Tracer" when I was watching the video.
  • FauchFauch FranceMember Posts: 2,230
    but I'm old and rusty
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,475
    I'm happy they were able to dust off a few Exo-Force molds.
    Baby_Yoda
  • LyichirLyichir United StatesMember Posts: 656
    SumoLego said:
    I'm happy they were able to dust off a few Exo-Force molds.
    That's not the Exo-Force hair. Looks to be brand new.
    Aanchir
  • Baby_YodaBaby_Yoda The world's backsideMember Posts: 1,078
    ^ Yay, another design to add to the crazy anime hairstyle collection.
  • HanzoHanzo VAMember Posts: 607
    I have zero interest in the theme, but does this theme mean LEGO is easing their stance on no modern guns?  Have they done any first person shooter games before?  I get that Star Wars has blasters, but some of these weapons in the game are more grounded in reality.
  • Baby_YodaBaby_Yoda The world's backsideMember Posts: 1,078
    I suppose Portal could be classed as a first person shooter. Adventure Time also has a lot of easter eggs related to modern warfare - in fact, if memory serves, there's a nuke in the Dimensions level pack. This is probably the closest they've ever gotten to the likes of Call of Duty, though.
  • leetshoeleetshoe USAMember Posts: 252
    Portal is a puzzle game, dude. Just a first person puzzle game
    Baby_Yoda
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,747
    Hanzo said:
    I have zero interest in the theme, but does this theme mean LEGO is easing their stance on no modern guns?  Have they done any first person shooter games before?  I get that Star Wars has blasters, but some of these weapons in the game are more grounded in reality.
    Generally the guns in Overwatch are highly exaggerated sci-fi designs even less realistic than a lot of the ones in themes like Star Wars or Super Heroes. The game also has a highly futuristic setting and tends towards over-the-top superhero/supervillain style characters and vehicles rather than more overtly military-inspired ones — hardly anything that would violate the Conflict and Weapons policy.

    The idea of making sets based on a first person shooter is definitely something LEGO has previously expressed resistance to, particularly in the LEGO Ideas guidelines. But compared to many other first-person shooters like Call of Duty or PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds, the violence in Overwatch doesn't tend to be realistic, graphic, or militaristic.

    It's probably because of this that unlike, say, Halo or COD, which tend to be rated M in the United States and PEGI 16 in Europe, Overwatch has a T rating in the United States and a PEGI 12 rating in Europe. This is pretty much analogous to the movies rated PG-13 in the US or 12A in the UK, which LEGO has shown they're willing to license. Even the Nintendo DS version of Bionicle Heroes had a T rating.
    Baby_Yoda
  • HanzoHanzo VAMember Posts: 607
    Aanchir said:
    Hanzo said:
    I have zero interest in the theme, but does this theme mean LEGO is easing their stance on no modern guns?  Have they done any first person shooter games before?  I get that Star Wars has blasters, but some of these weapons in the game are more grounded in reality.
    Generally the guns in Overwatch are highly exaggerated sci-fi designs even less realistic than a lot of the ones in themes like Star Wars or Super Heroes. The game also has a highly futuristic setting and tends towards over-the-top superhero/supervillain style characters and vehicles rather than more overtly military-inspired ones — hardly anything that would violate the Conflict and Weapons policy.

    The idea of making sets based on a first person shooter is definitely something LEGO has previously expressed resistance to, particularly in the LEGO Ideas guidelines. But compared to many other first-person shooters like Call of Duty or PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds, the violence in Overwatch doesn't tend to be realistic, graphic, or militaristic.

    It's probably because of this that unlike, say, Halo or COD, which tend to be rated M in the United States and PEGI 16 in Europe, Overwatch has a T rating in the United States and a PEGI 12 rating in Europe. This is pretty much analogous to the movies rated PG-13 in the US or 12A in the UK, which LEGO has shown they're willing to license. Even the Nintendo DS version of Bionicle Heroes had a T rating.
    Halo 5 is rated T for teen same as Overwatch.  And while I don't play, I see a lot of weapons like McCree's revolver that sure looks like a normal revolver and Bastion's minigun that fires like a real minigun, along with spent shells flying out the side.  What's more hypocritical is in Halo you're shooting fictional alien characters, while in Overwatch you're still shooting fictional characters, only they are mostly fellow humanoids.  The "futuristic" label could be applied to Halo weaponry as well.*

    *just playing devil's advocate here, not trying to argue with you ;-)
  • AleyditaAleydita BelgiumMember Posts: 758
    Never played it but I hope Overwatch isn't Lego's only collaboration with Blizzard. There must be a few hundred thousand Warcraft fans out there like me who would love to see some of the WoW characters in Lego format.
    SumoLegoBaby_Yoda
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,475
    Aleydita said:
    There must be a few hundred thousand Warcraft fans out there like me who would love to see some of the WoW characters in Lego format.
    Considering how popular WoW is certain markets (China, in particular), that surprises me as well.  There is a significant marketing opportunity there.

    I feel the same way about Pokemon/Mario - and am hoping that the Mega Construx deal expires so we can get some proper figures!
    ShibBaby_Yoda
  • ShibShib UKMember Posts: 5,045
    SumoLego said:

    I feel the same way about Pokemon/Mario - and am hoping that the Mega Construx deal expires so we can get some proper figures!
    I just want the Overwatch line to do well so that LEGO have more incentive to consider other video game IPs like Nintendo! 
    Baby_Yoda
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,296
    edited October 2018
    Hanzo said:
    I have zero interest in the theme, but does this theme mean LEGO is easing their stance on no modern guns? 
    Modern warfare ...
    Ayliffegmonkey76Baby_YodaFowlerBricksdavetheoxygenmanbobabricks
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,747
    edited October 2018
    Hanzo said:
    Aanchir said:
    Hanzo said:
    I have zero interest in the theme, but does this theme mean LEGO is easing their stance on no modern guns?  Have they done any first person shooter games before?  I get that Star Wars has blasters, but some of these weapons in the game are more grounded in reality.
    Generally the guns in Overwatch are highly exaggerated sci-fi designs even less realistic than a lot of the ones in themes like Star Wars or Super Heroes. The game also has a highly futuristic setting and tends towards over-the-top superhero/supervillain style characters and vehicles rather than more overtly military-inspired ones — hardly anything that would violate the Conflict and Weapons policy.

    The idea of making sets based on a first person shooter is definitely something LEGO has previously expressed resistance to, particularly in the LEGO Ideas guidelines. But compared to many other first-person shooters like Call of Duty or PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds, the violence in Overwatch doesn't tend to be realistic, graphic, or militaristic.

    It's probably because of this that unlike, say, Halo or COD, which tend to be rated M in the United States and PEGI 16 in Europe, Overwatch has a T rating in the United States and a PEGI 12 rating in Europe. This is pretty much analogous to the movies rated PG-13 in the US or 12A in the UK, which LEGO has shown they're willing to license. Even the Nintendo DS version of Bionicle Heroes had a T rating.
    Halo 5 is rated T for teen same as Overwatch.  And while I don't play, I see a lot of weapons like McCree's revolver that sure looks like a normal revolver and Bastion's minigun that fires like a real minigun, along with spent shells flying out the side. What's more hypocritical is in Halo you're shooting fictional alien characters, while in Overwatch you're still shooting fictional characters, only they are mostly fellow humanoids. The "futuristic" label could be applied to Halo weaponry as well.

    *just playing devil's advocate here, not trying to argue with you ;-)
    McCree's revolver looks like a real revolver, sure, but revolvers aren't really thought of as modern military weapons — and considering that McCree is basically a cowboy-themed superhero, I can't imagine LEGO expressing any more resistance to him carrying revolvers than actual cowboys depicted in Old West-inspired minifigs, sets, and licenses.

    I suspect the LEGO Group's objection to Halo has more to do with the higher age rating of most of the games than the weapons being too realistic or the military themes being too strong, considering that the same criticisms could be leveled at Star Wars (which has had plenty of soldier characters in military-inspired vehicles and uniforms). And, of course, the long-time resistance to video game themes in general on account of parents and the media often perceiving them as more faddish, violent, and habit-forming than movies or TV shows with similar content.

    Of course, it could also be a matter of target audience. While certainly there are plenty of kids/teens who like Halo, a lot of them also tend to be people who are self-conscious about liking childish things — including LEGO. Overwatch's more colorful and cartoony aesthetic and over-the-top cast of characters (including kids, cute robots, and cute/silly animals — the sort of stuff that "ruins" Star Wars for so many insecure edgelords) are often more "toyetic" and appealing to kids and teens who aren't so ashamed of their own childishness than the burly, faceless armored super-soldiers and brutish aliens of Halo.
    560HeliportBaby_Yoda
  • leetshoeleetshoe USAMember Posts: 252
    The T&A and all the stereotyping in Overwatch is more problematic than the guns. Not very woke of TLG to license such a problematic brand. 
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,475
    Unless there are Overwatch protesters, I think it'll be ignored as a glaring departure from LEGO's typical licensee.

    I'm a bit surprised someone hasn't attempted to criticize LEGO (for clicks) by previously producing a Deadpool minifigure.  That movie is very naughty!  And violent.
    Baby_Yoda
  • Baby_YodaBaby_Yoda The world's backsideMember Posts: 1,078
    ^ Because everyone secretly loves Deadpool.
    leetshoe said:
    Portal is a puzzle game, dude. Just a first person puzzle game
    Yeah, but it's in first person, and you're shooting things with a gun... right? :)
    leetshoe said:
    The T&A and all the stereotyping in Overwatch is more problematic than the guns. Not very woke of TLG to license such a problematic brand. 
    Overwatch does have a bit of that, but I wouldn't call it problematic. It isn't exactly causing riots in the streets. I do agree it's unusual for Lego to step this far out of their comfort zone, but they've been doing that a fair bit lately (see: The Big Bang Theory).
    SumoLego
  • LyichirLyichir United StatesMember Posts: 656
    Hanzo said:
    Aanchir said:
    Hanzo said:
    I have zero interest in the theme, but does this theme mean LEGO is easing their stance on no modern guns?  Have they done any first person shooter games before?  I get that Star Wars has blasters, but some of these weapons in the game are more grounded in reality.
    Generally the guns in Overwatch are highly exaggerated sci-fi designs even less realistic than a lot of the ones in themes like Star Wars or Super Heroes. The game also has a highly futuristic setting and tends towards over-the-top superhero/supervillain style characters and vehicles rather than more overtly military-inspired ones — hardly anything that would violate the Conflict and Weapons policy.

    The idea of making sets based on a first person shooter is definitely something LEGO has previously expressed resistance to, particularly in the LEGO Ideas guidelines. But compared to many other first-person shooters like Call of Duty or PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds, the violence in Overwatch doesn't tend to be realistic, graphic, or militaristic.

    It's probably because of this that unlike, say, Halo or COD, which tend to be rated M in the United States and PEGI 16 in Europe, Overwatch has a T rating in the United States and a PEGI 12 rating in Europe. This is pretty much analogous to the movies rated PG-13 in the US or 12A in the UK, which LEGO has shown they're willing to license. Even the Nintendo DS version of Bionicle Heroes had a T rating.
    Halo 5 is rated T for teen same as Overwatch.  And while I don't play, I see a lot of weapons like McCree's revolver that sure looks like a normal revolver and Bastion's minigun that fires like a real minigun, along with spent shells flying out the side.  What's more hypocritical is in Halo you're shooting fictional alien characters, while in Overwatch you're still shooting fictional characters, only they are mostly fellow humanoids.  The "futuristic" label could be applied to Halo weaponry as well.*

    *just playing devil's advocate here, not trying to argue with you ;-)
    The bit about Halo 5 might be a bit "too little, too late" considering Lego rejected offers to license the brand long before later installments brought the age rating down.
    leetshoe said:
    The T&A and all the stereotyping in Overwatch is more problematic than the guns. Not very woke of TLG to license such a problematic brand. 
    I generally don't see what Overwatch does as stereotyping, considering that their representations of characters from different countries tend to be both positive and more complex than just stereotypical representations of their country of origin.

    As for "T&A", it's fairly mild in most official Overwatch media—probably less so than a vast percentage of superhero comics, which have objectivised women for far longer and to a far greater extent. And there's really no accounting for explicit fanart, which has a tendency to arise for any franchise with appealing female characters regardless of the age grade of their original franchises.
    AanchirBaby_YodaBumblepants
  • Baby_YodaBaby_Yoda The world's backsideMember Posts: 1,078
    edited October 2018
    Or... any franchise... regardless of the gender of the characters or their sexual appeal... *ahem* sonic *ahem* Have you ever heard of the 34th Rule of the Internet?
    SumoLegoAanchirsid3windr
  • SparkyHamSparkyHam Bristol, UKMember Posts: 124
    SumoLego said:
    I'm a bit surprised someone hasn't attempted to criticize LEGO (for clicks) by previously producing a Deadpool minifigure.  That movie is very naughty!  And violent.
    If I recall, I think the X-Men set with Deadpool in, came out way before the Deadpool movie that you're referring to? Similar to how we had a venom minifig way before the recently released Venom movie.
    SumoLegogmonkey76Aanchir
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,475
    Protesters and critics (particularly parents' groups) tend not to put things in their correct context. 

    I think the math would be this:

    Deadpool = Violent and naughty
    LEGO = Made Deadpool figure in 2012
    Therefore:
    LEGO = Violent and naughty

    If you recall, LEGO severed their joint marketing with Shell.  (Despite LEGO literally being a petroleum product.)

    And as an aside, I don't know how kids playing with a Shell-branded, Dinoco-branded or Octan-branded toy is going to compel that child to ignore the negative environmental consequences of petroleum drilling.
    Baby_Yoda
  • HanzoHanzo VAMember Posts: 607
    Lyichir said:
    Hanzo said:
    Aanchir said:
    Hanzo said:
    I have zero interest in the theme, but does this theme mean LEGO is easing their stance on no modern guns?  Have they done any first person shooter games before?  I get that Star Wars has blasters, but some of these weapons in the game are more grounded in reality.
    Generally the guns in Overwatch are highly exaggerated sci-fi designs even less realistic than a lot of the ones in themes like Star Wars or Super Heroes. The game also has a highly futuristic setting and tends towards over-the-top superhero/supervillain style characters and vehicles rather than more overtly military-inspired ones — hardly anything that would violate the Conflict and Weapons policy.

    The idea of making sets based on a first person shooter is definitely something LEGO has previously expressed resistance to, particularly in the LEGO Ideas guidelines. But compared to many other first-person shooters like Call of Duty or PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds, the violence in Overwatch doesn't tend to be realistic, graphic, or militaristic.

    It's probably because of this that unlike, say, Halo or COD, which tend to be rated M in the United States and PEGI 16 in Europe, Overwatch has a T rating in the United States and a PEGI 12 rating in Europe. This is pretty much analogous to the movies rated PG-13 in the US or 12A in the UK, which LEGO has shown they're willing to license. Even the Nintendo DS version of Bionicle Heroes had a T rating.
    Halo 5 is rated T for teen same as Overwatch.  And while I don't play, I see a lot of weapons like McCree's revolver that sure looks like a normal revolver and Bastion's minigun that fires like a real minigun, along with spent shells flying out the side.  What's more hypocritical is in Halo you're shooting fictional alien characters, while in Overwatch you're still shooting fictional characters, only they are mostly fellow humanoids.  The "futuristic" label could be applied to Halo weaponry as well.*

    *just playing devil's advocate here, not trying to argue with you ;-)
    The bit about Halo 5 might be a bit "too little, too late" considering Lego rejected offers to license the brand long before later installments brought the age rating down.
    leetshoe said:
    The T&A and all the stereotyping in Overwatch is more problematic than the guns. Not very woke of TLG to license such a problematic brand. 
    I generally don't see what Overwatch does as stereotyping, considering that their representations of characters from different countries tend to be both positive and more complex than just stereotypical representations of their country of origin.

    As for "T&A", it's fairly mild in most official Overwatch media—probably less so than a vast percentage of superhero comics, which have objectivised women for far longer and to a far greater extent. And there's really no accounting for explicit fanart, which has a tendency to arise for any franchise with appealing female characters regardless of the age grade of their original franchises.
    My main issue is consistency, Overwatch is a T rated game where you shoot other people with guns, albeit semi-futuristic guns and somewhat cartoonish, that's the game.  Destiny is another example of something they'd likely never pursue, yet it doesn't do anything worse than Overwatch does.
    SumoLegoBaby_Yoda
  • LyichirLyichir United StatesMember Posts: 656
    Hanzo said:
    Lyichir said:
    Hanzo said:
    Aanchir said:
    Hanzo said:
    I have zero interest in the theme, but does this theme mean LEGO is easing their stance on no modern guns?  Have they done any first person shooter games before?  I get that Star Wars has blasters, but some of these weapons in the game are more grounded in reality.
    Generally the guns in Overwatch are highly exaggerated sci-fi designs even less realistic than a lot of the ones in themes like Star Wars or Super Heroes. The game also has a highly futuristic setting and tends towards over-the-top superhero/supervillain style characters and vehicles rather than more overtly military-inspired ones — hardly anything that would violate the Conflict and Weapons policy.

    The idea of making sets based on a first person shooter is definitely something LEGO has previously expressed resistance to, particularly in the LEGO Ideas guidelines. But compared to many other first-person shooters like Call of Duty or PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds, the violence in Overwatch doesn't tend to be realistic, graphic, or militaristic.

    It's probably because of this that unlike, say, Halo or COD, which tend to be rated M in the United States and PEGI 16 in Europe, Overwatch has a T rating in the United States and a PEGI 12 rating in Europe. This is pretty much analogous to the movies rated PG-13 in the US or 12A in the UK, which LEGO has shown they're willing to license. Even the Nintendo DS version of Bionicle Heroes had a T rating.
    Halo 5 is rated T for teen same as Overwatch.  And while I don't play, I see a lot of weapons like McCree's revolver that sure looks like a normal revolver and Bastion's minigun that fires like a real minigun, along with spent shells flying out the side.  What's more hypocritical is in Halo you're shooting fictional alien characters, while in Overwatch you're still shooting fictional characters, only they are mostly fellow humanoids.  The "futuristic" label could be applied to Halo weaponry as well.*

    *just playing devil's advocate here, not trying to argue with you ;-)
    The bit about Halo 5 might be a bit "too little, too late" considering Lego rejected offers to license the brand long before later installments brought the age rating down.
    leetshoe said:
    The T&A and all the stereotyping in Overwatch is more problematic than the guns. Not very woke of TLG to license such a problematic brand. 
    I generally don't see what Overwatch does as stereotyping, considering that their representations of characters from different countries tend to be both positive and more complex than just stereotypical representations of their country of origin.

    As for "T&A", it's fairly mild in most official Overwatch media—probably less so than a vast percentage of superhero comics, which have objectivised women for far longer and to a far greater extent. And there's really no accounting for explicit fanart, which has a tendency to arise for any franchise with appealing female characters regardless of the age grade of their original franchises.
    My main issue is consistency, Overwatch is a T rated game where you shoot other people with guns, albeit semi-futuristic guns and somewhat cartoonish, that's the game.  Destiny is another example of something they'd likely never pursue, yet it doesn't do anything worse than Overwatch does.
    Just because Lego wouldn't necessarily pursue something doesn't mean that's because it's because it's inappropriate for them. Brand fit extends beyond factors like the level of violence or sexuality—it's also a matter of the tone and audience of a franchise. Overwatch is colorful, cartoony, and optimistic, with distinctive, unique characters, all factors that enhance its kid appeal. The plot and aesthetic of Destiny and Halo are much more grim and serious by comparison.

    Another factor is what kind of niche a franchise fills in Lego's portfolio. Destiny and Halo have a lot more overlap with Star Wars in terms of their aesthetic and subject matter, for better or for worse.
    SumoLegoBaby_YodaAanchir
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,475
    edited October 2018
    @Lyichir said:
    The plot and aesthetic of Destiny and Halo are much more grim and serious by comparison.
    The last SW Saga movie was pretty grim.  Dark Knight Rises was pretty grim.  The Angry Birds suicidally propel themselves at the Pigs.

    (And nevermind that Indiana Jones sets have Nazis.)

    Their choices for franchises and themes will always be in the gray area where profits, marketing and public relations intersect.
    HanzoBaby_Yodamaaaaaaa
  • HanzoHanzo VAMember Posts: 607
    Looks like this new halloween skin for Widowmaker was just confirmed.  Wonder what it will look like in minifig form?


  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,475
    Malifcent?
    sid3windr
  • LyichirLyichir United StatesMember Posts: 656
    I imagine the theme'll probably have to last a little while before we start seeing many non-default skins appear in sets (much like in Minecraft). There are so many heroes to cover already that they'll probably have their work cut out for them to get them all into sets by the end of the theme's first year.
    Baby_Yodasid3windr
  • HanzoHanzo VAMember Posts: 607
    Geez, I try to point out a lady holding a gun with bewbs hanging out and how LEGO is ok with, so as to combat the earlier defenders in the thread and all I am getting is thoughtful analysis.  Thanks a lot :-P
    AleyditaSumoLegoBaby_Yoda560Heliport
  • BumblepantsBumblepants Sofia BG/Dallas TXMember Posts: 5,544
    Lego islander minifigure wore less than that in '94 and that was an in-house property. 
    gmonkey76SumoLegoBaby_Yodapharmjod
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,475
    And Patrick.  He has three nipples.
    Baby_Yoda
  • Baby_YodaBaby_Yoda The world's backsideMember Posts: 1,078
    ^ Which is strange. Surely it should be five?
    SumoLego said:
    Protesters and critics (particularly parents' groups) tend not to put things in their correct context.
    Yeah... If I recall, wasn't there a petition for Lego to stop making dwarf figures because someone thought it was offensive to those with growth disorders?
    BrickByBrickSumoLegosid3windr
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,747
    SumoLego said:
    Protesters and critics (particularly parents' groups) tend not to put things in their correct context. 

    I think the math would be this:

    Deadpool = Violent and naughty
    LEGO = Made Deadpool figure in 2012
    Therefore:
    LEGO = Violent and naughty

    If you recall, LEGO severed their joint marketing with Shell.  (Despite LEGO literally being a petroleum product.)

    And as an aside, I don't know how kids playing with a Shell-branded, Dinoco-branded or Octan-branded toy is going to compel that child to ignore the negative environmental consequences of petroleum drilling.
    I think the Shell controversy was fueled (no pun intended) in large part by Shell’s political lobbying to expand Arctic oil drilling. A fictional oil company like Octan doesn’t have nearly that same degree of baggage, at least, as long as there’s no “Octan Arctic Oil Rig” or “Octan Lobbying Firm” sets.

    Baby_Yoda said:
    ^ Which is strange. Surely it should be five?
    SumoLego said:
    Protesters and critics (particularly parents' groups) tend not to put things in their correct context.
    Yeah... If I recall, wasn't there a petition for Lego to stop making dwarf figures because someone thought it was offensive to those with growth disorders?
    It was more around the unfortunate coincidence of the first wave of Sainsbury LEGO trading cards having an “Evil Dwarf” card and no other dwarf representation, which I have to admit is kind of a bad look. Hard to blame parent groups for responding that way to actual merchandise that took away the context that helped justify that figure in the first place (i.e. the existence of lots of other LEGO dwarf characters which had been framed in a much more positive light).
    SumoLegoBaby_Yoda
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,475
    edited October 2018
    I like that we live in a world where fantasy caricatures - dwarves, elves and trolls - require some sort of balanced treatment.  The PR person for Orcs needs to get on the stick.  They're slackin'!

    If we just had more positive portrayals of fictitious beings.  I'm starting a petition to change the public perceptions of dragons.  Always negative!  Where is there mention of Fu-Schnickens the Wise and his time spent helping the homeless?  It's only dragons that try to eat Thor, have the power of chi, hatch from eggs where Winter is coming, or sound like KAAAAAAHN get publicity.

    (I'd but an Octan Lobbyist Office Modular.  We are lacking in a good set of brick-built cubicle.)
    Baby_Yoda
  • FauchFauch FranceMember Posts: 2,230
    hardly any evil dragon in ninjago, the overlord, the nindroid dragon, I'm not even sure about morro's dragon. and they seem to be good in elves, but I didn't watch the show.
  • LyichirLyichir United StatesMember Posts: 656
    Fauch said:
    hardly any evil dragon in ninjago, the overlord, the nindroid dragon, I'm not even sure about morro's dragon. and they seem to be good in elves, but I didn't watch the show.
    Ashwing, the Goblin King's dragon is not necessarily inherently evil but is vicious almost to the point of madness thanks to the Goblin King's mind control.
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,747
    SumoLego said:
    I like that we live in a world where fantasy caricatures - dwarves, elves and trolls - require some sort of balanced treatment.  The PR person for Orcs needs to get on the stick.  They're slackin'!

    If we just had more positive portrayals of fictitious beings.  I'm starting a petition to change the public perceptions of dragons.  Always negative!  Where is there mention of Fu-Schnickens the Wise and his time spent helping the homeless?  It's only dragons that try to eat Thor, have the power of chi, hatch from eggs where Winter is coming, or sound like KAAAAAAHN get publicity.

    (I'd but an Octan Lobbyist Office Modular.  We are lacking in a good set of brick-built cubicle.)
    Jokes aside, terms like goblin, troll, and orc generally don't have the issue of being extremely common parlance for actual human beings who are differently sized or shaped than average (and whose representation in media has traditionally been limited to villains, comic relief, or a combination of both).
    Baby_Yodastlux
Sign In or Register to comment.
Recent discussions Categories Privacy Policy