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Discovered a problem: my carousel has yellowed!

Muftak1Muftak1 Somewhere cold, probably raining (aka Ireland)Member Posts: 515
edited February 2018 in Everything else LEGO
I'm currently finally getting around to sorting out the "Lego Room" at my house and in the process had discovered that my other half had "tidied away" the carousel from the Winter Village Market set - unfortunately, the tidying away was actually putting it on a window ledge in our daughters room, hanging a blackout blind for our daughter and then forgetting the carousel was there.

Needless to say the white bricks aren't so white anymore and the material pieces that make up the top of the carousel don't look the best either.

I did do a search on the site but there seemed to be multiple threads and multiple cleaning methods; so colour me confused!

What are the recommendations for cleaning yellowed (but modern) bricks and what would the best method be of cleaning the roof pieces for the carousel?

Any help much appreciated!

Comments

  • FowlerBricksFowlerBricks USAMember Posts: 1,680
    I heard that putting them back out in the sun helped. I can't vouch for that, but it seems worth a try.
  • SirBrickalotOfLegoSirBrickalotOfLego WalesMember Posts: 507
    ^Putting them back in the sun? How would that help?
    BumblepantsMr_Cross
  • FowlerBricksFowlerBricks USAMember Posts: 1,680
    ^Putting them back in the sun? How would that help?
    I have no idea. That's just what I heard. Like I said, I can't vouch for it at all. I'm planning on testing it out though.
  • BrickByBrickBrickByBrick Massachusetts, USAMember Posts: 692
    I think you're talking about hydrogen peroxide. I don't know much about it, but I'm pretty sure if you put bricks in a hydrogen peroxide solution then put them back out in the sun or something like that. Again never done it but remember reading something like that on here. There are definitely some threads about it and this was in one of them as a possible solution.
    Muftak1Mr_Cross
  • Muftak1Muftak1 Somewhere cold, probably raining (aka Ireland)Member Posts: 515
    I believe H2O2 was mentioned alright - The thing is theres not much sunshine in Ireland so would that be an issue?
  • BrickByBrickBrickByBrick Massachusetts, USAMember Posts: 692
    Again, I'm no expert so take my words with a grain of salt, but I think I remember reading that the sunlight in the H2O2 process only speeds up the process, I would guess that with less sunlight it would just take longer?
    Muftak1
  • M_BossM_Boss Houston, TexasMember Posts: 249
    edited February 2018
    Hydrogen Peroxide works great for bricks. Jang has a video on it: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HGagdufGvGM
    gmonkey76Muftak1AstrobricksMr_Cross
  • drdavewatforddrdavewatford Hertfordshire, UKAdministrator Posts: 6,529
    AstrobricksMr_CrossPitfall69TyresOFlahertyMuftak1
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,090
    Putting them in the sun doesn't help. If it did, parts would yellow then white, then yellow then white, ... leaving them in the sun will just degrade them faster.

    In the H2O2 solution, you should also turn on a UV lamp to help accelerate it. This is a good idea, since it reduces the time required. Especially for coloured but yellowed parts.

    They will obviously discolour again though once done.
    AstrobricksSirBrickalotOfLegosid3windr
  • mustang69mustang69 North CarolinaMember Posts: 492
    I've done the H2O2 trick and can confirm it does work. My biggest tip though would be to make sure the container you soak them in has enough room so you can spread out the pieces so each one can get plenty of sunlight to help the process.
    Astrobricks
  • Sethro3Sethro3 United StatesMember Posts: 819
    Hydrogen peroxide and UV does work. It worked on older LEGO. Everyone claimed older LEGO had the bromide fire retardant so that is what caused the yellowing, but it sounds like modern bricks (that have never been discussed having that bromide mixture) also yellow. So I don't know. But it doesn't hurt much to try the H2O2 method. If not, just buy new bricks. Which by the sounds of it, everyone will have to buy new whites eventually since  they are the easiest to discolor.
  • AndyPolAndyPol UKMember Posts: 377
    Muftak1 said:
     my other half had "tidied away" the carousel from the Winter Village Market set - unfortunately, the tidying away was actually putting it on a window ledge in our daughters room,
    Welcome to my world, but all they need is educating. I'm working on my other half and although it takes time (about 15 years so far) it does work! My other half now actually lets me buy modulars as she, by her own admission, can see that they are quite good! She also now consults me about the best way to "tidy up" my collection!

    Seriously though, go for the H2O2 option, it does work.
    Muftak1
  • LegoboyLegoboy 100km furtherMember Posts: 8,785
    I would say for the few bricks required to build the mini carousel, replace them.
    Muftak1
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,090
    Same with the cloth parts. I think you can get them for 50p each or so on BL.

    Although those will be able to be bleached white, then dyed or coloured in with an alcohol based marker pen and look reasonable (my handy method for making different coloured capes). Although the cost of the dye will be similar to buying new ones but you'll have lots of it.

    Muftak1
  • Muftak1Muftak1 Somewhere cold, probably raining (aka Ireland)Member Posts: 515
    I'll try the H2O2 method now I just need to find somewhere in Ireland that sells it...


  • snowhitiesnowhitie BelgiumMember Posts: 3,001
    Chemist would be my guess. It might not be the best time of year to try it though, not that much sunlight over here at the moment, when I've looked it up , it always said to do it in summer. Unless you've got UV lamps.
    Muftak1
  • Muftak1Muftak1 Somewhere cold, probably raining (aka Ireland)Member Posts: 515
    edited February 2018
    No UV lamps in my house! :)

    Also, define "summer" - Ireland doesn't have a climate - it has weather - which changes on the hour! ;-)
  • snowhitiesnowhitie BelgiumMember Posts: 3,001
    ;) summer = longer days and sun stronger than now, I'd wait till May at least. Although if it's not much could always give it a try. Unless you can climb a high mountain and put it at the top!

    You only need it at Christmas right?
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,090
    Muftak1 said:
    No UV lamps in my house! :)

    Also, define "summer" - Ireland doesn't have a climate - it has weather - which changes on the hour! ;-)
    Have you got a fluorescent lamp? They give off a little UV.

    You can also get a UV torch for about £5-6 here, they can be used for looking for dog wee. CSI pets.

    Muftak1
  • Muftak1Muftak1 Somewhere cold, probably raining (aka Ireland)Member Posts: 515
    Don't think I've ever searched out dog wee. I thought cat wee fluoresced?

     snowhitie said:
    You only need it at Christmas right?
    My Winter Village is out all year!
    snowhitie
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 19,090
    Muftak1 said:
    Don't think I've ever searched out dog wee. I thought cat wee fluoresced?

    Yes, that's why you need a UV lamp. The UV lamp works about about 350nm so you cannot see it, then the fluorescence in the cat's piss re-emits at a higher wavelength in the purple/blue range. Same for gin and tonic (well, tonic).
  • iso3200iso3200 97 miles from Brickset TowersMember Posts: 2,049
    Muftak1 said:
    I'll try the H2O2 method now I just need to find somewhere in Ireland that sells it...


    Pharmacy sells a 3% or 9% solution over the counter, but normally a maximum of two bottles at a time.

    I can confirm it works well. I put them in a glass pyrex tray on our patio table on a sunny day. Give them a stir every now and then to make sure all sides get exposed.

    However, for the cost of a bottle or two of that, the hassle of doing it (and doing it well) versus picking up the pieces from your collection or buying from Bricklink as @Legoboy suggests could well be a better option.
    Muftak1
  • BumblepantsBumblepants DFWMember Posts: 6,543
    I had good success with the hydrogen peroxide method but then a couple years later it had all reverted back to damaged state. After that experience I will just replace future UV damaged parts.
    Fizyx
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