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How many "systems" are there within the LEGO brand, and how many ways can you connect two pieces?

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Comments

  • SueButcherSueButcher Member Posts: 23
    Gotcha. But if "pony ears" was used back in the day by Lego, I'll do it. The old bricks can stand it, good quality ABS has a certain amount of rubberiness and I'm not building 'em to fly!
  • dmcc0dmcc0 Member Posts: 778
    Lyichir said:
    Is the right-angle connection of plate edges between studs "illegal"? I mean, did Lego publish designs with this type of connection?   
    Technically this IS an illegal connection by modern standards! Despite being used in older sets, the height of a plate is slightly larger than the distance between two studs, stressing the elements. This was one of the techniques described as "formerly legal, now illegal" in the widely circulated presentation where the concept of illegal connections was first made public.

    It's worth noting that this applies to plates, not tiles. Tiles are actually ever so slightly less tall than a full plate, so do not stress the studs as much.
    Indeed, #20319 Saturn V uses a tile connected at a right angle to a plate (Printed flag piece)
  • SueButcherSueButcher Member Posts: 23
    What about plugging bricks into the mesh of the old fence pieces? It looks like Lego thought of designing the fences to take studs, but the fit is very tight and takes a knife to separate if you plug a whole 4x2 brick in. A neat way to build at right angle, though.
    Astrobricks
  • M1J0EM1J0E Member Posts: 644
    What about plugging bricks into the mesh of the old fence pieces? It looks like Lego thought of designing the fences to take studs, but the fit is very tight and takes a knife to separate if you plug a whole 4x2 brick in. A neat way to build at right angle, though.
    I’m assuming that was intended to be a real thing?  ‘I thought I was so smart when I discovered that as a kid
    NeilCrosby
  • M1J0EM1J0E Member Posts: 644
    Thanks Todd, that prove it was a thing definitely!  
  • SueButcherSueButcher Member Posts: 23
    That's what I meant, Todd. So it was "legal" for a while. It's probably not a legal technique now; it feels like there's much more stress on the bricks than with "pony ears", and the fence pieces might break when the model's pulled apart.
  • AanchirAanchir Member Posts: 2,990
    That's what I meant, Todd. So it was "legal" for a while. It's probably not a legal technique now; it feels like there's much more stress on the bricks than with "pony ears", and the fence pieces might break when the model's pulled apart.
    Individual studs in in the lattice of the 1x4x1 fence pieces certainly still seem to be an approved technique, as that's used to attach the stair railings in #10260 Downtown Diner. But I don't think I've seen any sets in recent history that used studs in the lattice of the 1x4x2 fence piece.
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