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LEGO Basic Sets and their anomalies...

IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
edited October 2017 in Collecting
While finishing one of my newer volumes of my LEGO Encyclopedia Guide, I came across some odd things about LEGO basic sets in the 1998-2000 era.  Both the writing on the box, and the set naming numbers.

For example....  all North American/South American basic sets of this box type had "classic" on the box top....




And all the ROW (rest of world) had "basic" on the box top for the same set numbers...





Not sure why that is... since 'basic' is pretty universally understood.  But we never fully understand why TLG does something a bit different.

But anyway... any of these sets sold worldwide came in 2 versions.  Those sold only in the Americas or only in ROW came only in either 'classic' or 'basic' box type.  DItto for bucket, tub and polybag sets.  Makes sense.

And then I saw that many of these sets had a 2nd set number... which is unusual.

Here is a LEGO 1999 UK full line catalog page... and it shows sets with a secondary set number and set type....





But these secondary numbers don't appear elsewhere... and unfortunately there are no 'full line' catalogs for that era from North America to see if those secondary set numbers were used in North America.  But in Britain they show Starter Set 100, Super Set 100, Brick Pack 100, Challenger Set 100.... and on into the 200, 300 and maybe 350 and 400 range (for Challenger sets).

But when you look at continental European 1999 catalogs (here's a Dutch one)... it doesn't show the 2nd set numbers (usually 100, 200, 300, 400)...




I noticed that all the online set databases all use the UK set name, which doesn't match elsewhere (which is not unusual)... 

Here is a list of most of these basic/classic sets (from my guide), and it shows all the names....




For the folks in the UK these set names match what is in the catalog, but for folks elsewhere, there is no mention of these as... Starter Set 100, Super Set 200, Challenger Set 300, 350 or 400 anywhere in their local catalogs.  And of course, in North America... basic (classic) sets are generally ignored in their larger catalogs.

I sometimes think that at TLG.... the left hand doesn't always know what the right hand is doing.... 

They always like to add a little Mayhem into their set logic!  ;-)




snowhitiesid3windrmadforLEGO
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Comments

  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    edited October 2017
    .... just been thinking out loud...

    There's just as much 'quirkiness" to new LEGO as there is to the earlier years... which I call the "Classic Mayhem Era"....  ;-)

    One of these basic sets even came with or without a camera in Europe!




    And the same set in North America (classic)... didn't have that camera option...




  • VictorLovesToysVictorLovesToys California Member Posts: 13
    LEGO encyclopedia guide volumes? What are you referring to?
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    @stlux thanks for the link!  I didn't want to make this sound like a Marketplace promotion.   I have not been told by the publishers to stop selling the online guide... which is much cheaper, and will contain the same info (with future upgrades).   So I'm still selling some online versions... ;-)
    MAGNINOMINISUMBRAmadforLEGO
  • MAGNINOMINISUMBRAMAGNINOMINISUMBRA Member Posts: 986
    just spitballing here - Maybe the US markets move from Basic to Classic was a memo within the Marketing Department?  Basic CAN be seen as a derogatory term.  I vividly remember having to chastise my eldest around a decade ago for using it. EVERYTHING that her and her friends didn't like or understand was Basic. 


  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    Interestingly enough USA LEGO catalogs didn't seem to be produced in the "FULL" range of sets back in the 1980s and 1990s.  They seemed to only contain the other LEGO systems besides Basic.  The LEGO catalogs starting in 1994 included all of North America (it was in English, French and Spanish).  The sets here started to have writing in 4 languages (English, French, Spanish and Portugues)... so the same "classic" sets were sold in USA, Canada and much of Latin America.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,800
    ^^ I agree. Basic makes something sound simple and just about adequate whereas classic sounds more retro and cool.
  • mithridatemithridate HawaiiMember Posts: 51
    Not to hijack, but every time I hear/read basic, I think of my trusty BASIC cartridge for the Atari 800 — back in the day, when copy-and-paste coding meant transcribing the code from the manual.
    sid3windrdavetheoxygenmanricecakeLegoAddict
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    edited October 2017
    Basic sets were the very first sets introduced when LEGO started making the Automatic Binding Bricks in 1949.  It wasn't until 1956 that any other building sets were introduced.  700/1 (large), 700/2 (medium and 700/3 (small) were the first basic sets (back in the 1949-55 era every set with bricks used the 700/x number).  Wish I had this one... the large 1949 box top version of 700/1 Automatic Binding Bricks set....  in mint... this one would probably (at auction) get bid up to 10,000 Euro's!



    New image for my LEGO Encyclopedia/ and online Collectors guide.
  • jgadgetjgadget Member Posts: 181
    Hi Gary,

    I have been trying to get in touch with you for some time now, both via email and via PM here, but have had no response from you.
    Please would you get in touch with me?
    Thanks,
    Jonathon
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    Just sent you a PM Jonathan.  I switched Email systems.


  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    From the late 1960s to the early 1970s, the same 011 thru 088 basic sets of Britain, Ireland and Australia (under licensee British LEGO Ltd., Wrexham Wales) used slightly different boxes for the same sets as those of continental Europe and Asia.  You can always tell a UK box version if it had "Basic Set" on the side.  Those of continental Europa and Asia didn't have it, which makes sense due to the many countries they were sold in.  The smallest (011 didn't have room on the side of the box, so they put it on the front... and the biggest set 088 Super set was just considered "super".... ;-)



    These sets were never sold in the USA or Canada... which were still in their Samsonite years... and selling different Samsonite LEGO sets altogether... with the set number = part counts (120, 215, 285, 375, 450, 615).
  • CyberdragonCyberdragon Maryland, U.S.AMember Posts: 378
    edited October 2017
    Did these sets come with any sort of simple "building ideas" guide or something or were they just pieces only? I know you could get building instructions elsewhere though like those "blueprints".
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    edited October 2017
    Here is an image of random different parts of the above boxes put together into a collage of sorts....  (I use this image as a chapter cover page in one of my upcoming LEGO Volumes)...



    And the box covers were basically all that you got for instructions.

    But there was one build in the 055 set that must have given TLG complaints by parents of young LEGO builders.  Because the 055 set did come with one set of instructions for one of the box models.... the truck on the far right.

    This is the only model that had instructions that I am aware of....








    There may be some other models in one or more of the above sets that were produced.... but I am not aware of them....

    Images from my Collectors Guide.
    catwranglerstluxsid3windrmadforLEGOsnowhitie
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    Working on another one of my LEGO volumes for the LEGO Encyclopedia series...while doing some research I came across this interesting series... the Time Cruisers (1996-97) the 6593 Flying Time Vessel Set... I have found 3 variations to this set....

    1) North American box type... with parts count, and writing in English/French/Spanish:




    2) Germany version of 6493, which comes with a cassette tape....




    3) and then there is this version of 6493 which appears to have been a TRU Exclusive for the UK.





    Oy.... so many variations.....
    TkattSumoLegosid3windrmadforLEGOBumblepantsstluxcatwranglersnowhitie
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,926
    edited February 2018
    'Muricans don't buy anything 'Basic'.  We need unecessarily complicated and sophistomicated sets to substantiate our continued superiority in all things except the nonsensical Winter Olympic Sports, manufacturing McDonalds toys, soccer and TV gameshows --

    ...Said the mid-to-late-'80's marketing guy at LEGO North American HQ to the box design people.

    It's also important to me to buy eye drops endorsed by Jennifer Aniston because she's pretty and smiles a lot, and drive a Lincoln because Matthew McConaughey rambles nonsense in an expensive suit.

    And... Time Cruisers remain very underappreciated.  What is on the cassette?  Some Europe B-sides?  I'm smelling something exclusive!
    catwrangler
  • The_RancorThe_Rancor Dorset, UKMember Posts: 760
    The corner's very blurry but I think that German box says the cassette is an 'SOS from the past' - how very enigmatic. Probably the professor spouting off about some such ghouls or crazily eclectic parts usage in German. Someone I know got hold of the yellow Technic Power Puller the other day and it still had a totally sealed VHS in it with footage of the real power puller team in action. Didn't open it of course but another classic old format.
    SumoLegoFizyxcatwrangler
  • TkattTkatt MNMember Posts: 328
    You can listen to the full Time Cruisers Audio Drama on Youtube. But if you just want to listen to "SOS aus der Vergangenheit" it's on there too. Or you can read the transcripts on Eurobricks.
    Bumblepantsstluxsid3windrcatwranglersnowhitieSumoLego
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    The corner's very blurry but I think that German box says the cassette is an 'SOS from the past' - how very enigmatic. Probably the professor spouting off about some such ghouls or crazily eclectic parts usage in German. Someone I know got hold of the yellow Technic Power Puller the other day and it still had a totally sealed VHS in it with footage of the real power puller team in action. Didn't open it of course but another classic old format.
    HA!!   Yeah blame it on the box... and not our "we're not 7 anymore" failing eyesight.... Sigh.... all the boxes look blurry to me now.... :-(
    catwrangler
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    One other thing... only on the German version of the previous 6493 set... in the upper right corner it has "FLYBO" underneath the set number.  Anyone have any idea what that means?  


  • TazakkTazakk Member Posts: 8
    Istokg said:
    One other thing... only on the German version of the previous 6493 set... in the upper right corner it has "FLYBO" underneath the set number.  Anyone have any idea what that means?  


    Flybo was the name of that model outside the Americas!
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    @Tazakk ; Thanks so much!!  I thought it might be something like that.  I did a lot of searches with Google... and could find nothing about that.   ... and now I know!  ;-)
  • FauchFauch FranceMember Posts: 2,294
    edited February 2018
    there was a magazine called lego klick and the timecruisers were the heroes. Tim Timebuster and professor Foklou I think, their ship was the flybo. their other vehicles were the scooty and navigator
    Istokg
  • SumoLegoSumoLego New YorkMember Posts: 11,926
    It's hard not to laugh at 'Foklou'.  Clever adults!
    IstokgBumblepants77ncaachamps
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    edited February 2018
    Fauch said:
    there was a magazine called lego klick and the timecruisers were the heroes. Tim Timebuster and professor Foklou I think, their ship was the flybo. their other vehicles were the scooty and navigator

    Thanks for the info!  I read about the KLICK magazines, just never got around to reading the ones I saw.  It took me a while to understand the Time Busters, Time Cruisers and Time Twisters.  And some character names were changed between the time the magazine came out 2 years before the sets, and the actual 1996-97 sets.

    Also I noticed that there was a Time Cruisers board game by RoseArt.
  • AstrobricksAstrobricks Minnesota, USMember Posts: 2,469
    Istokg said:
    One other thing... only on the German version of the previous 6493 set... in the upper right corner it has "FLYBO" underneath the set number.  Anyone have any idea what that means?  


    It’s on the UK TRU box too.
  • Legobuilder178Legobuilder178 UKMember Posts: 54
    Any ideas what the first lego technic bike was.
    Cheers Legobuilder178
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    Any ideas what the first lego technic bike was.
    Cheers Legobuilder178
    https://brickset.com/sets/857-1/Motorbike-with-Sidecar
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    Istokg said:
    One other thing... only on the German version of the previous 6493 set... in the upper right corner it has "FLYBO" underneath the set number.  Anyone have any idea what that means?  


    It’s on the UK TRU box too.
    Yeah.... that's the downside of Brickset... you only get 6 minutes to correct your own spotted errors once you hit the send button on your thread.  ;-)
    FizyxAstrobricks
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    Kabaya branded LEGO sets were produced in the late 1990s and early 2000s.  There are over 100 of them.

    But a problem arises with these sets.  They were all polybag sets that were sold with Kabaya sweets packaged together in a Kabaya box.  But once removed from the box... they become regular LEGO sets.

    It appears that most of the Kabaya numbered sets were sold as regular LEGO sets with a different set number.  However a large number of these Kabaya numbered sets were also sold as regular LEGO sets under that same number.

    For example... the 3016, 3017, 3018 and 3019 sets were sold as a 4 box Kabaya pack... with the individual polybag numbered sets inside....

    This is the polybag as found in a Kabaya Sweets packaged box (outside of the box)... and also as sold in Europe/Australia and Asia as polybags...



    And here it is as a North/South America polybag only packaged set....




    So technically it is only a Kabaya set when it is still box packaged with the sweets.  Otherwise it becomes a regular set, since the box to identify it as Kabaya, is gone.

    However... some of the 100+ sets that were sold as Kabaya... were only sold boxed in Japan.  The problem becomes trying to identifying the Kabaya only sets... especially if some of the known examples no longer have the outer box.  Oy!
  • LusiferSamLusiferSam MontanaMember Posts: 480
    Very few things put more fear in my heart as a collector than hearing Kabaya does.  A number of these sets are repackaged versions of other sets (and sometimes the reverse).  There's a number of these set that are exclusives to Japan.  Personally I found these ungodly hard to find and unreasonably expensive.  

    There's a also a large number of Kabaya packing variations that are poorly documented (at least in the English speaking Lego communities).  The problems arise when people don't know about these variations or understand the value difference.  For example the four packs that come in their own cardboard tray are more desirable than same four pack that is shrink wrapped as a block.  Or as individual boxes, three of the sets may have had a release elsewhere but the fourth is a Kabaya exclusive and demands at high premium.

    I've picked up enough of these to know I don't want any more.  I cringe every time I think these sets.
  • blade_guyblade_guy Member Posts: 193
    I love that the Americans had to be a year older than everyone else to be able to play with that set...
    Bumblepantsdmcc077ncaachamps
  • The_RancorThe_Rancor Dorset, UKMember Posts: 760
    edited March 2018
    It draws from memory the Town sets that were sold inside cookie tins in the UK, however unlike Kabaya the numbering was not anomalous - I believe you could get most of them as polybags in potentially easier ways around the world - but we had to settle for ones covered in cookie dust and smeared chocolate. At least that's what happened in my cookie tins!

    Here's a pic of the tin (taken straight from my iPad so apologies if not optimised for web):


  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    Very few things put more fear in my heart as a collector than hearing Kabaya does.  A number of these sets are repackaged versions of other sets (and sometimes the reverse).  There's a number of these set that are exclusives to Japan.  Personally I found these ungodly hard to find and unreasonably expensive.  

    There's a also a large number of Kabaya packing variations that are poorly documented (at least in the English speaking Lego communities).  The problems arise when people don't know about these variations or understand the value difference.  For example the four packs that come in their own cardboard tray are more desirable than same four pack that is shrink wrapped as a block.  Or as individual boxes, three of the sets may have had a release elsewhere but the fourth is a Kabaya exclusive and demands at high premium.

    I've picked up enough of these to know I don't want any more.  I cringe every time I think these sets.
    @LusiferSam

    Thanks for your comments... this helps explain the difficulty I have had at figuring out which sets were truly Kabaya exclusives, and which ones were sold elsewhere under the same number.

    And you make a good point about the Kabaya boxed 4 packs.....




    .... as opposed to the Kabaya "bundled" 4 packs...



    stlux77ncaachamps
  • FauchFauch FranceMember Posts: 2,294
    does the shape of the packaging really matters that much? some people are crazy
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    To new set collectors boxes or packaging may not seem important.  But to vintage LEGO collectors, a boxed set is like gold.  Especially when they make variaitions to them.

    Some Kabaya sets were even packaged like Ramen Noodles... and command premium prices!  



    FizyxBumblepantsstluxsid3windr77ncaachamps
  • LusiferSamLusiferSam MontanaMember Posts: 480
    Kabaya is Modern Lego Mayhem.  Despite being post internet, the documentation around these sets is lacking.  For example I knew that 3017 was sold in Australia, but had heard about the a North American release.  I believe 3023 and 1286 were Kabaya exclusives because the premium they demanded.  However new information could have come out about these and a non Kabaya release found.  Or I maybe mixing these up with another pair from their series. 

    The Knight's Kingdom and Dino Island sets are two that I know came both the tray style and cellophane block style packaging (not shrink wrapped as I said earlier). 


    I forgot about the Ramen style packaging.  I wonder if they have additional instructions printed on the inside like the Kabaya boxes do.
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    @LusiferSam

    Finding which sets are uniquely Kabaya, and  which ones were also sold elsewhere certainly is a challenge.

    But I find that Brickset has statistics, that although not foolproof, really help in determinating which sets were Kabaya exclusives.

    If you look at the list of all the Kabaya sets in Brickset, for each set it gives you the 10 leading countries that have ownership of the sets.

    https://brickset.com/sets/tag-Kabaya

    Some sets have very low populations (of owners), and Japan is near the top in ownership, that tells me that this set is likely a Kabaya exclusive.

    But if there are 500+ sets that are not Japanese owned... then I believe the set was sold (in a polybag only) elsewhere.

    Also, having a North America (English/French/Spanish) packaging (with part count) is a good indication that this was also sold in North America (often at Shop-At-Home).

    I have found those 2 items have helped in determining the distribution of Kabaya numbered sets.

    Sam... I love your comparison... LEGO Mayhem is not the exclusive domain of early LEGO sets... it also relates to sets in the modern intro of the internet era.  And it amazes me at how poorly documented even the more recent LEGO sets have been at times. 

  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    One other thing I wanted to mention when it comes to LEGO sets (such as these Kabaya+ sets)... when I look at the (Brickset set listing) "what top 10 countries have the most owners of these sets" list.... I am puzzled by the the different mix of nations that are included in each of the top 10 countries.

    For example... these are all listed as Kabaya Ninja sets 3016-3019.  But while this really doesn't tell us much about which sets were Japan Kabaya exclusives... it does tell us that some of these sets appear to only have been sold in specific countries besides Japan....

    3016 (Master & Heavy Gun Ninja polybag):




    3017 (Ninpo Water Spider Ninja polybag):




    3018 (LEGO Shogun Go Ninja polybag):





    3019 (Ninpo Big Bat Ninja polybag):




    So many of these appear to have been sold in North America, and eastern Europe... as well as western Europe... although it seems as though some of these were not sold in the Netherlands... which is unusual.

    And only one of these sets mentions Japan in the Brickset database of collectors sets.

    I makes it difficult to determine what was sold where!


    Onebricktoomany
  • LusiferSamLusiferSam MontanaMember Posts: 480
    I'm not remotely convinced that this is a good method for determining where sets where sold.  There are too many aftermarket exchanges that cross borders. Plus you need to account for the fact that a majorly of Brickset users are in the US, UK and Canada and very few are Japanese. 

    One way to start with this might be to look at percentage of owners in a given country vs total users from that country.  Let's look at the case of 3017 vs 3018 as an example.  100 out of 282 owners are US users for 3017, which is 35%.  35% of Brickset users are American, so it seems reasonable to concluded 3017 was sold likely in the US.  For 3018, there 38 US owners out of 183 total, which is 21%.  This is a under-representation, so the set was likely not sold in the US.  Looking a little deeper, Poland and Australia are over-represented as is Japan.  Germany is dead on at 5%. 

    I just don't think this will tell you much.  Without a bigger date set (ie more owners and more users from the target country) I worries there is just too much noise to really see a clear pattern.  Japan represents such a small users base that a single Japanese owner for sets with less than 5000 owners creates an over-representation.

    This is also fails to take into account popularity.  Ninja, KK I, Adventurers, and Star Wars are very popular themes and collectors are driving a higher demand for these sets.  Where as Town, basic and Technic are less popular. 

    Anyway, just my two cents.


    FizyxBumblepants
  • FizyxFizyx ColoradoMember Posts: 781
    I'm not remotely convinced that this is a good method for determining where sets where sold.  There are too many aftermarket exchanges that cross borders. Plus you need to account for the fact that a majorly of Brickset users are in the US, UK and Canada and very few are Japanese. 

    One way to start with this might be to look at percentage of owners in a given country vs total users from that country.  Let's look at the case of 3017 vs 3018 as an example.  100 out of 282 owners are US users for 3017, which is 35%.  35% of Brickset users are American, so it seems reasonable to concluded 3017 was sold likely in the US.  For 3018, there 38 US owners out of 183 total, which is 21%.  This is a under-representation, so the set was likely not sold in the US.  Looking a little deeper, Poland and Australia are over-represented as is Japan.  Germany is dead on at 5%. 

    I just don't think this will tell you much.  Without a bigger date set (ie more owners and more users from the target country) I worries there is just too much noise to really see a clear pattern.  Japan represents such a small users base that a single Japanese owner for sets with less than 5000 owners creates an over-representation.

    This is also fails to take into account popularity.  Ninja, KK I, Adventurers, and Star Wars are very popular themes and collectors are driving a higher demand for these sets.  Where as Town, basic and Technic are less popular. 

    Anyway, just my two cents.



    I think you hit the nail on the head.  For sets with a large number of owners and low resale numbers, those lists are likely to be pretty indicative, especially if used in conjunction with the percentage representation that you pointed out.  But as soon as either the number of owners goes down or the number of resales goes up, that view is going to be immediately muddied.  And that's ignoring the fact that, with the low cost and ease of international shipping being what it is today (comparatively, of course), even tracking first sales would not necessarily be a good indicator of where things are being sold.  I'm not sure there is any solid way to reliably find this out without either word from the source or a connection with firsthand knowledge from the countries in question.  (And even then, for the second it's likely that would only be able to provide a limited view into if something was sold in that one country or not, with similar confirmation necessary in every other country as well.)
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    edited March 2018
    Oh I understand the limitations of using those Brickset stats very well.  You never know how many of those sets have been resold (more than one count for the same set), or people who list a set they built from spare bricklink parts, or any other number of reasons.

    Some of the things that I find interesting is that some countries will usually be at the top of the list, such as USA, Britain, Netherlands, Germany, Canada and Australia.  It's when I find (for example) the Netherlands missing from the top 10 list... that I wonder if the set was sold at all in the Netherland?

    And then we have sets that are near the top of the list for countries such as Poland, Russian Federation, Hungary and Croatia.  I would view those as limited release sets that were produced in small numbers as promotional sets in say Japan.... and then also sold in some of those Eastern European countries as well (or other countries that are usually not on the top 10 list).

    Back in the 1960s one of the 1:87 vehicles (VW Van) was sold in an extremely rare color (all white)... and although they were produced as a Danish all white promotioanl van (KOLEVAGN labeled), those withouth the labels seem to all originate from Croatia.  So over the years TLG sold excess promotional items in other countries (probably limited quantities) as well as the promotional country intended.  More Mayhem!
    Fizyx
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    Just found another interesting pair of sets that changed boxes.

    The MODEL TEAM 5580 Highway Rig Set was sold from 1986-92.

    It appears that from 1986 until 1989 it was sold in this box design...




    Then from 1990 until 1992 the 5580 was sold with this box design, before being discontinued.




    It appears that Model Team sets (1986 intro) 5510 and 5540 also come in two variations that both changed in 1990 (where the "M" Model Team logo appeared on the boxes, as well as the words "MODEL TEAM" changed from an earlier cartouche style heading to a later metallic heading.  This new box top style was continued in all new Model Team sets until 1999, when (for 1 year) a new box top design was once again introduced.  1999 was the last year for Model Team sets (with the exception of a Legends reissue).

    But the 5510, 5540 and 5580 were the only Model Team sets to come in 2 box top designs.
    Bumblepantssid3windr
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    2 box variations is common... in early LEGO sets, the number of box variations is almost mind numbing.

    The 700/3A basic set was introduced in 1953, and sold until 1965.  When it was introduced there already was a 700/3 and 700/4 set... so they labeled a midsized basic set between those numbers as 700/3A.

    It comes it at least 15 box variations.... :-O

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/istokg/albums/72157645472562780

    Images from my collectors guide.
  • LusiferSamLusiferSam MontanaMember Posts: 480
    Does the change in the Model Team boxes not concur with the US release?  I've not see this mentioned anywhere, but US catalogs list 5510, 5540 or 5580 as new for 1989. I don't remember them being available in any boxes other than the second style (not to say that they weren't).  It was quite the surprise the first time I saw all the online databases list the release year as 1986.  At first I thought it was a mistake. 



  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    @LusiferSam I was wondering that too.... until I saw this earlier 5580 box with writing in English (and a barely visible piece count).  So I think this was the first USA (1 year only) box type used in the USA until the new designs came out in 1990.


  • KaitchKaitch N. IrelandMember Posts: 372
    What you were saying about Kabaya sets earlier...
    I believe some Star Wars sets were sold with Kabaya? Anyone know much about that?
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    Yes, among the 106 or so promotional Japanese Kabaya sets, there were 3 Star Wars polybag sets that were also found as Kabaya sets packaged in a box with Kabaya sweets.  They were polybags 6963, 6964 and 6965....












    Their 2004 Kabaya packaging in Japan.  The polybags were inside the box.....




    These sets were sold as just polybags elsewhere.


    stluxsid3windr
  • KaitchKaitch N. IrelandMember Posts: 372
    So of all the Kabaya Lego topics, I picked the most boring?
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 2,099
    Of the 106 or so LEGO Kabaya sets (most promotional LEGO sets of any company) the only ones I find interesting are the 3 Ramen Noodle packaging.  No wait... there are a few with the LEGO polybags inside the candy box packed in clear unmarked cellophane, without any LEGO artwork.

    Other than that, the most interesting thing (to me) about the Kabaya sets is that whenever they are offered for sale... the sellers tend to say "don't eat the candy"... which has long ago passed its' "sell by" date... ;-)
    Fizyxshikadi
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