Shopping at LEGO or Amazon?
Please use our links: LEGO.comAmazon
As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.

Do you keep the extras from each set?

ethanjwallethanjwall United StatesMember Posts: 118
Totally. They end up just getting thrown in my Lego bins at some point, but I always always ALWAYS keep them.

Comments

  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 20,310
    Why would anyone not keep them?

    BumblepantsMattsWhat
  • JudgeChuckJudgeChuck UKMember Posts: 1,549
    ^Indeed... Why would you ever throw spare parts?

    In some cases, the extras can be used on the model to add a little something, otherwise, they're always useful as, err, spares!
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 20,310
    If you want some ideas about what people do with them, try this thread from last week http://bricksetforum.com/discussion/comment/430365#Comment_430365

    or an older one ...
    http://bricksetforum.com/discussion/16787/what-does-everyone-do-with-the-spare-bricks-that-come-in-every-lego-set

    or a slightly more general one about spare parts ...
    http://bricksetforum.com/discussion/3921/extra-pieces/p1


    AllBrick
  • Sethro3Sethro3 United StatesMember Posts: 937
    The title is misleading. It wouldn't make much sense to throw away the extra pieces. You could separate them from each set and give them away to someone I suppose, but why wouldn't you keep them?
  • mr_bennmr_benn United KingdomMember Posts: 908
    Naturally extras are kept as everyone else has said.  But when there's an opportunity to stick them on the set - extra landscaping pieces or flowers for dotting over any sort of set with surrounding ground - they'll go right on the set, TAKE THAT INSTRUCTIONS!
    flordcatwranglerethanjwall
  • PicopiratePicopirate Member Posts: 323
    Extras from my sets go in zip lock baggies, I then write the name of the set on the baggie and place it and the instructions back in the box.  If I get rid of the box, I place the baggie and the instructions in a plastic "file storage" box.

    Extras from lego dimensions sets are all combined into a single baggie and all the instructions sheets are placed in a second baggie.

    Extras from my sons sets get thrown in his parts bin (the rest of the set ends up there anyway) and the instructions go in my plastic "file storage" box.
  • Jackad7Jackad7 Wisconsin Member Posts: 555
    What is the point of the extras? Are they just parts that are commonly lost by user/malformed by production so they include spares?
  • Lego_StarLego_Star ... in a galaxy far, far away.Member Posts: 2,147
    Weight difference. Cheaper to include spares on parts where an unnoticed minor weight difference on the overall set due to a missing part might mean a phonecall to CS. This is why common spares are things like a 1x1 tile, stud, a 1x1 cheese slope for example. They don't weigh much and a missing one with no spare would mean you cannot complete your build. This is not the building experience LEGO want to provide so they include spares of small, lightweight parts.
    AllBrickBumblepantscatwranglerJackad7Aanchir
  • ryjayryjay Member Posts: 1,001
    lol, I used to do a funny thing with the extra pieces....see how many of them I could connect together before running out of options, then I'd toss the built sequence into the kids lego trays.  It always seemed like a better option then trying to pick up each little piece one by one as the kids knock them to the floor.
    AllBrickMaffyDcatwranglerJackad7
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    Lego_Star said:
    Weight difference. Cheaper to include spares on parts where an unnoticed minor weight difference on the overall set due to a missing part might mean a phonecall to CS.
    That's not how TLG weigh sets.

    The smallest components come together in small bags. If one tiny piece is missed, then it's a more significant part of that whole bag - and it's that which is weighed. That bag is then included in a larger bag - which is of course weighed to ensure that the first bag, and other larger pieces, are not missed. And the set as a whole is weighed to make sure that all the bags, not the individual parts, are included

    There's a quirky statistic that says that an average set is weighed a dozen times. It's why mistakes are rare.

    I imagine a bit of care is taken to ensure that bags don't have very similar weights.

    Certain parts will always have at least one spare - if there's a single 1x1 round plate in a particular colour, there'll be a spare. Whilst they're covering themselves over a packing error, it's more likely they're also covering the pieces that get left in the corners of bags or that disappear under the sofa as a bag is opened. If you compare a set's contents with a BrickLink inventory, you'll usually find it agrees on the part counts including the spares.
    catwrangler
  • PicopiratePicopirate Member Posts: 323
    I started setting aside each unique 1x1 (tile, plate, cheese, etc.) and similarly size pieces (ie claws, antennas, etc.) as I encounter them.  Ever since I started, I have counted exactly one spare for each group of numbered bags. An overall set may contain more spares but each group of bags contains exactly one spare.  Also, items like flowers that must be broken off a mold may contain more spares since the come in groups of 4.  

    I actually feel cheated if my count comes up short, but so far i have always found the missing spare hiding under another piece.  LEGO is so precise with their spare count that I think the primary reason for including them is because they are easily misplaced, as @TigerMoth mentioned.  Protection against packing error is probably just a side benefit, and not really a concern to LEGO since their packing process is so precise.
    catwrangler
  • PeteMPeteM Gallifrey (near Bristol)Member Posts: 442
    My cats like to fuss around me when I'm building and often try to steal various pieces. The larger ones I can get back, but the small ones occasionally disappear completely - I think they're secretly building a UCS Falcon from all my spare pieces somewhere...
    catwrangler
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 20,310
    Picopirate said:
    I started setting aside each unique 1x1 (tile, plate, cheese, etc.) and similarly size pieces (ie claws, antennas, etc.) as I encounter them.  Ever since I started, I have counted exactly one spare for each group of numbered bags. An overall set may contain more spares but each group of bags contains exactly one spare.  Also, items like flowers that must be broken off a mold may contain more spares since the come in groups of 4.
    Not if you have a set with a Bona Fett helmet in, then you get spares of the range finder and the visor in one bag.
  • LyichirLyichir United StatesMember Posts: 968
    CCC said:
    Picopirate said:
    I started setting aside each unique 1x1 (tile, plate, cheese, etc.) and similarly size pieces (ie claws, antennas, etc.) as I encounter them.  Ever since I started, I have counted exactly one spare for each group of numbered bags. An overall set may contain more spares but each group of bags contains exactly one spare.  Also, items like flowers that must be broken off a mold may contain more spares since the come in groups of 4.
    Not if you have a set with a Bona Fett helmet in, then you get spares of the range finder and the visor in one bag.
    Pre-packed bags like that are a special case because the parts all come off the same mold and are immediately packaged together, which means that a set that only uses one or two elements from one of those pre-packs will necessarily have to include all the others as extras, whether or not there's an actual place where they go in the build. In the case of that pre-pack, it was originated for Clone Wars sets that would make much more use of many of those parts (often for multiple figs in a single set), but is nowadays mostly used for Mandalorian characters in which the only part that's used is the antenna.

    Other similar pre-packed bags include the current Lego City tool assortment (which comes in a bag rather than on a sprue like older tools), Lego Friends hair accessories (including things like bows, combs, hair dryers, and sunglasses), Lego Friends pet accessories (including things like spray bottles and ribbons), Lego Friends floral accessories (including multiple varieties of flowers along with things like ladybugs and butterflies), and Lego Friends kitchen accessories (including things like plates, flatware, and kitchen appliances like mixers)
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    Lyichir said:

    Other similar pre-packed bags include
    ...

    One of earliest examples is probably the locomotive wheel set used on Emerald Night. A "set" (with one part number) consists of two wheels with flanges and one without, although the bag contains double that.

    What's particularly remarkable is that, in Bright Red, the blind wheels have never actually been used in any set, but are included in #7597 simply because of the way they are moulded and packaged.
    MattDawson
  • BrainsluggedBrainslugged England (the grim North)Member Posts: 2,058

    I've always assumed the spares are parts most likely to have a defect. Having purchased over $30,000 of sets over the past 5 years (I just inventoried everything in Bricklink!) the ONLY part I've ever has missing was a single sticker. I never believe anyone when they say they have missing pieces, because when it happens to me, I'm either sitting on it, thrown it away in the bag it came in or have made a mistake in following the instructions. Often its a good way to ensure you haven't made a mistake because if you have more than one 1x1 of a certain color left at the end, you've messed up. Sometimes I actually like to remove the spares before I start just for fun (and to further quench my OCD so I can finish a build with zero parts left over).

    Two reasons I think the spares are pieces most likely to mess up. One is because you always get a spare aerial piece, which is relatively large, but delicate. They've also started doing that with the dragon wings - 3 to a box rather than 2. The other is that the only other error I've ever had in a set was a malformed 1x1 stud. At first I thought it was new type of piece, but then realized that it just hadn't been made with enough plastic to fill out the stud portion of the part.

  • MattDawsonMattDawson Solihull, UKMember Posts: 1,374
    I keep the spares from a set in one of the bags the parts come in. Depending on the set, it gets taken out of the box, built, then returned to the box in semi broken down form, along with the instructions and a bag of the spares.
  • MaffyDMaffyD West YorkshireMember Posts: 3,239
    I keep the spares from a set in one of the bags the parts come in. Depending on the set, it gets taken out of the box, built, then returned to the box in semi broken down form, along with the instructions and a bag of the spares.

    I do almost exactly the same, except I put the instructions in a filing cabinet.
    OldfanMattDawson
Sign In or Register to comment.

Shopping at LEGO.com or Amazon?

Please use our links: LEGO.com Amazon

Recent discussions Categories Privacy Policy Brickset.com

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. Sign in or register to get started.

Brickset.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, the Amazon.com.ca, Inc. Associates Program and the Amazon EU Associates Programme, which are affiliate advertising programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.

As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.