Lego by Samsonite colors

Legoist61Legoist61 NetherlandsMember Posts: 18
Recently I have bought 5 kilograms of Lego. The lot contained several sets and quite a few red/blue/white and yellow bricks.
The yellow and blue bricks are strangely coloured, some bricks are bright yellow, which looks pretty normal others are a pale yellow. It looks like they are discoloured, but throwing them on a heap they sound different than new lego. The lego logo is on the studs but very difficult to read.
Could this be a false kind of lego or is it old(samsonite) lego??

Another thing is that the 1 x 4 bricks have several different pins on the bottom side, I have never noticed all this variations. Is this also some old type of lego?

I hope the colour difference is clear in the pictures.

[IMG]http://i63.tinypic.com/2aguwdw.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i67.tinypic.com/abqfza.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i63.tinypic.com/2mnrfbq.jpg[/IMG]



Comments

  • oldtodd33oldtodd33 Denver 4800 miles to BillundMember Posts: 2,416
    Depending on where the Lego bricks came from I doubt they are Samsonite as that was only for the US and Canada. You have several decades of Lego bricks in your pictures though. The one in the last picture on the right is the oldest without bottom tubes is from the 60's, the bricks on the left with bottom tubes and no supports are 80's or so the ones top right with bottom tubes and supports are 70's or so and the bottom right with hollow tubes are 90's to even present day. 
  • LusiferSamLusiferSam MontanaMember Posts: 480
    Red and yellow use to have cadmium in them for the coloring.  Cadmium red and cadmium yellow are bright, brilliant colors but are no longer used in toys due to cadmium's toxicity.  Older bricks will be a little of a color and discolor differently as they age then modern bricks.

    If you looking for info on logos, try the here.  It's a little hard to see but the Samsonite logo has an 'open O'.  Samsonite used their molds much longer then Lego would have and they quality control was pretty poor, so weak or missing logos are uncommon on their bricks.
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    Once you get back to the 60s, which you are, you might be looking at cellulose acetate rather than ABS. Cellulose acetate pieces tend not to be as bright as ABS, may sound different, and, particularly telling, may warp a little.
  • Legoist61Legoist61 NetherlandsMember Posts: 18

    I already have a lot of bricks from the 50's and 60's and they produce a 'normal' lego sound. They still look ok (mainly red and white), are not warped or really discoloured. 

    The lot I recently bought is the first one with these strange coloured pieces.

    The faint yellow ones are indeed warped. Were the  cellulose acetate ones produced by Lego in Denmark?

  • rolyateelrolyateel Member Posts: 40
    edited January 2016
  • LusiferSamLusiferSam MontanaMember Posts: 480
    Legoist61 said:

    I already have a lot of bricks from the 50's and 60's and they produce a 'normal' lego sound. They still look ok (mainly red and white), are not warped or really discoloured. 

    The lot I recently bought is the first one with these strange coloured pieces.

    The faint yellow ones are indeed warped. Were the  cellulose acetate ones produced by Lego in Denmark?


    If they sound "normal" then they are not from the 50's.  Only CA bricks made in the 50's, not ABS.  CA bricks have dull, thumping sound when you drop them or rattle them together.  ABS have a brighter, higher sound.

    Most CA bricks were produced in Denmark.  After the change to ABS Lego seems to have moved to eliminate they stock of CA elements faster than Samsonite (possibly by selling them to Samsonite).  Samsonite used as mix of ABS and CA elements well in the early 70's.  Samsonite likely didn't make any new CA bricks after the change, they ust had big stockpile.
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