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How to get started selling on Bricklink

13

Comments

  • bibble69bibble69 UKMember Posts: 4
    If forgot to add, don't worry too much about store policies, most buyers don't read them.
    RirinetteandheKingAlanI
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,751
    I have a question for other store owners. Someone in Taiwan wants to buy three minifigs from my store, for a total of $29. The package won't weigh more than a few ounces.

    First class shipping is only about $14, but if I want insurance, it would need to be $50+

    Is there any reason I shouldn't sell to Taiwan? And if I don't have insurance, can they try to scam me or something?

    Thanks,
  • All_That_RocksAll_That_Rocks UKMember Posts: 646
    Speaking as someone outside of the US, does your $14 cover you for any level of insurance at all? i.e. even the cheapest UK postal rates cover you for £20 and I think international is usually upto £50. 

    Personally I would probably take the risk at $14. In all my years of trading and selling various items internationally I have never been ripped off. 


  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,751
    Speaking as someone outside of the US, does your $14 cover you for any level of insurance at all? i.e. even the cheapest UK postal rates cover you for £20 and I think international is usually upto £50. 

    Personally I would probably take the risk at $14. In all my years of trading and selling various items internationally I have never been ripped off. 


    I don't think it covers me at all. And for some reason, I can't add insurance.

    Unfortunately, people have tried to rip me off before. Thankfully they were the world's worst scammers, but still.

    Scammers including, but not limited to:
    "I sent you the game two months ago and made sure it worked before I sent it. You are not getting a refund now."

    "The tracking info shows the package was delivered to your door. Would you like a pen and paper so you can keep your story of why you don't have the package straight?"


    Thanks for the advise. :)
  • ColoradoBricksColoradoBricks Denver, CO, USAMember Posts: 1,673
    @SprinkleOtter , I use insurepost.com for all my insured packages. You can insure a first class package for $1.60 (up to $100 in value).
    Check the list of countries as they don't insure for every countries but they cover the main ones.

    @All_That_Rocks , first class does not cover anything at all, if you want coverage through USPS, they direct you to the more expensive Priority Mail.

    goshe7
  • All_That_RocksAll_That_Rocks UKMember Posts: 646
    Wow! I would have thought you'd have some level of coverage. Sounds like you've had a lot worse luck than me too. 

    This is probably why I haven't bought from the US much todate. Shipping, + Insurance + customs inspection charge + duty = Too expensive.

    :(
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,751
    @ColoradoBricks Thanks a ton! It is a flat $1.60 for international, too, right? I don't seem to be able to figure out what it will cost without filling in tracking numbers and stuff.
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,751
    Wow! I would have thought you'd have some level of coverage. Sounds like you've had a lot worse luck than me too. 

    This is probably why I haven't bought from the US much todate. Shipping, + Insurance + customs inspection charge + duty = Too expensive.

    :(
    Yeah... But if you are looking for a bigger set (or a bunch of sets), then it is usually cheaper to buy from the US. Some of my biggest orders have been from Europe.
  • MattsWhatMattsWhat Studley, UKMember Posts: 1,643
    edited June 2016
    @SprinkleOtter also, you're not the one who has to take the risk, it is the buyer.  You tell them the options ($14 or $50 insured).  If they want the protection they go for the insured, if they are happy with the risk then you have in writing they are happy, you collect proof that the item was posted and you're done.  eBay would probably still side with them, but anyway.
    Some stores say if the value is over $x then you have to pay insurance - I kind of understand this, but again, surely if the buyer wants to risk their stuff it is up to them, isn't it?
    And yeah, in the UK any old stamp insures you to £20 if you have proof of postage.
    SprinkleOtterLobotkiki180703andhe
  • ColoradoBricksColoradoBricks Denver, CO, USAMember Posts: 1,673
    @SprinkleOtter yes, it is $1.60 for every $100 for every international shipment ($1.05 in the US). You will need a tracking number but you always have one (worst case scenario if you ship from the post office, use the custom form number).

    I had once a first class package to Netherlands where tracking shows it never left custom clearance, I got full refund within 3 days ($82 order).
    SprinkleOtterkiki180703
  • CupIsHalfEmptyCupIsHalfEmpty CanadaMember Posts: 547
    Insurance is always on the seller. As on online seller you have an obligation to get the item to the purchaser in the same state as advertised. If the seller can't afford the risk of shipping without insurance, or can't afford the insurance, that seller should refuse the sale. Both Ebay and Paypal buyer protection function this way.

    In my bricklink store, I assume the risk for any parcel under $50 knowing that someday one will get lost/damaged/scammed so I put a couple bucks aside on each sale for my personal insurance fund. Anything over $50 and I only ship using a method that's insured. If that method is to expensive for the buyer then they go somewhere else and I lose out on the sale. Which is less risky for me than shipping without insurance. 


    rd1899BumblepantscatwranglerKevin_Hyatt
  • MattsWhatMattsWhat Studley, UKMember Posts: 1,643
    edited June 2016
    ^indeed this is correct.  Beyond eBay and Paypal (which are very buyer centric as that is how they make their money) the consumer rights act says this:
    "the retailer is responsible for the condition of the goods until the goods are received by you, or by someone else you have nominated to receive them on your behalf such as a neighbour.

    This means that the retailer is liable for the services provided by the couriers it employs - the delivery firm is not liable."

    So, you can make the buyer pay for the insurance, but if they turn it down then it would still be you who was liable.  I was wrong before, don't listen to me.  This seems totally unfair if the buyer opted for no insurance, but it does seem the law would be on their side in terms of getting a refund.  I always just thought this was part of eBay's buyer protection, but now extends to all online sales of physical goods apparently.  I can't find the wording for before October 2015.


    CupIsHalfEmpty
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,751
    Okay, I'm at my wit's end here. How do I set up onsite payment with Bricklink (so that I do not have to send an invoice for every order) and a micro-transaction account with paypal? I can't find a way to do either, and both have pathetic websites for finding out how to do such (actually, paypal doesn't even have one...).
  • ColoradoBricksColoradoBricks Denver, CO, USAMember Posts: 1,673
    edited June 2016
    @SprinkleOtter  on site payment still requires you to send an invoice, it is just that a link will show up in the order for the buyer to pay.

    To configure it: http://www.bricklink.com/v2/mystore/payment_method.page
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,751
    @ColoradoBricks Ah, thanks. Guess it's not as effective as I thought it was.
  • kizkizkizkiz londonMember Posts: 95
    On the insurance side it does make me chuckle when I read terms stating that no refund will be given unless insurance is purchased, knowing full well that PayPal will refund me if seller can't prove delivery...ie. tracked. 
    I'm no scammer, but bricklink is ripe for a lot of sellers to lose a lot of money through ignorance of PayPal t+c
    CupIsHalfEmptykiki180703rd1899Kevin_Hyatt
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,751
    kizkiz said:
    On the insurance side it does make me chuckle when I read terms stating that no refund will be given unless insurance is purchased, knowing full well that PayPal will refund me if seller can't prove delivery...ie. tracked. 
    I'm no scammer, but bricklink is ripe for a lot of sellers to lose a lot of money through ignorance of PayPal t+c
    Maybe. If they are like me, they keep a standing balance of $0 in their accounts.

    In the past, someone tried to scam me, saying that they never got a Mars Mission Strike Fighter from me. I had tracking proving it, and they couldn't even keep their story straight, but they finally went to Ebay complaining. Having $0 in my accounts and being somewhat new to ebay at the time, if ebay had ruled against me, I planed on just closing my accounts, and not giving a refund (because, obviously, the guy was a scammer). Ebay had a couple sheds of sense, and ruled with me, but still.
  • All_That_RocksAll_That_Rocks UKMember Posts: 646
    @SprinkleOtter I could be wrong but I believe that as paypal have your credit card/bank details on file they will draw on that if you have $0 paypal balance. So, having a $0 balance is no defence.
  • CupIsHalfEmptyCupIsHalfEmpty CanadaMember Posts: 547
    Having $0 would not protect you. If Paypal didn't rule in your favor, they would get the money from you regardless. You are bound by the terms. If you weren't bound then think of the flipside. A scammer scams somebody then withdraws/spends the money so their balance is $0 when they got caught. but because it's $0 they are off the hook?

    The key to your story is you had tracking showing delivery. Transactions under ~$750 are protected by paypal against scams involving item not received if you have proof of delivery. Above $750 a signature is also required. If there isn't proof of delivery then there's no way to prove the quote "scammer" isn't honestly telling the truth and didn't receive the item. 
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,751
    I am unsure why ebay/paypal would have tried locking my funds, then... This was many years ago.
  • kizkizkizkiz londonMember Posts: 95
    Yup, no balance won't help if you ever want to use eBay or PayPal ever again.
    They will take it from any card linked. If they can't do that, they put your account in a negative balance and set the debt collectors on you. Now, you can easily not pay, as they don't do court, but they will ban your accounts, and they're very good at linking you to a banned account and keeping your money.
  • KingAlanIKingAlanI Rochester, NYMember Posts: 2,141
    So it takes a few months, even a couple years, to really build up inventory? I'm torn between building up inventory and waiting to sell more of what I already have.

    I don't offer insurance, it doesn't seem worth it anyway, and this seems like one less thing to handle.

    I've started messaging customers after I pack, saying that the order's ready to go and giving them the tracking number. Sometimes customers ask me for the tracking number anyway, this is quicker and simpler than looking it up. Also, the service should help leave a good impression.

    I had about 10 feedback when opening my store, most of that from purchases years ago. Taking small orders probably helped get me started. All my feedback is great, but not all buyers leave feedback. Is this a problem for other sellers, and what do you do about it? I leave feedback soon after they pay, so it's not like they're waiting for me.
    kbenjes
  • palmers9grbpalmers9grb ukMember Posts: 261
    Has anyone got any advise on how to get orders, with out doing YouTube etc.. I have only just started really and I know it takes time as many people have said. Or like KingAlanl has said do I need better buyer feed back. Thanks
  • ecmo47ecmo47 North CarolinaMember Posts: 2,101
    Have the lowest price on Bricklink. You will get hits! Just be prepared to quote and ship overseas.
    KingAlanI
  • LobotLobot UKMember Posts: 1,004
    Has anyone got any advise on how to get orders, with out doing YouTube etc.. I have only just started really and I know it takes time as many people have said. Or like KingAlanl has said do I need better buyer feed back. Thanks
    • As @ecmo47 said, being competitively priced when you start selling is a smart approach, especially as you're likely to have a relatively modest inventory. 
    • Also I'd recommend that you should buy multiples of sets so you'll end up with a decent quantity of specific parts (it also makes picking a lot easier!). 
    • I'd also spend a bit of time on your 'Splash' page so that it's really clear what any additional charges will be for any prospective buyers.
    • Knowledge and price is key when buying; know your market and do some research on part-out values etc, as well as the popularity/sales volumes of minifigures etc
    • Get everything sorted in advance (it takes a lot of time, but you'll be able to pick orders far quicker, which will be appreciated by your customers!).  You can buy zip-lock bags cheaply in bulk from Ebay etc and they're well worth the outlay!
    I hope that this helps, good luck :-)
    KingAlanIchuckppalmers9grb77ncaachamps
  • All_That_RocksAll_That_Rocks UKMember Posts: 646
    @palmers9grb others advice is very good!! I would add not to limit yourself to bricklink. I think I was/am very like you - new to the Lego scene, new to Bricklink etc. I have setup a Bricklink store and it is going OK but I still get by far the largest part of my sales via eBay. Yes eBay is a lot more expensive on fees but I find that I can also sell most minifigs for more on there than on Bricklink.

    If you intend to part sets out on Bricklink do be prepared to spend an awful lot of time parting out sets and when you get them, picking orders. For instance my largest parts order was for about 100 different lots and it took about two hours to pull and pack the order for the great sum of around £55. 

    I don't mind that too much because I enjoy the whole experience. BUT profits are not huge and you will be sat with a lot of stock in sets and parts which take a LOT of room and you will need to invest pretty heavily in storage containers.

    If you pick the right sets, you will probably find the the minifigs recoup the value of the set and the remainder of the parts will make up any profit if/when they sell.


    KingAlanIpalmers9grb
  • KingAlanIKingAlanI Rochester, NYMember Posts: 2,141
    @ecmo47 @Lobot @All_That_Rocks all have good points.
    My prices aren't the absolute lowest, but are below average. More inventory helps here too.
    Buying multiples is also useful because it's no more work to list them. Listing more of the same set later isn't much more work because of the Consolidate option.
    Sometimes I list a set but don't actually sort the pieces right away, and then have to fill orders from that set. Besides taking longer to pick an order, it isn't as efficient overall as completely sorting the new sets first.
    Dollar stores are good for small amounts of bubblemailers, plastic zipper bags, packing tape, etc. I eventually got bubblemailers in bulk and I'm nearing that point with plastic zipper bags. Besides helping sort inventory, I use some of them to pack each order.
    I avoid having too many additional charges, but the few I have are made clear in multiple places.
    Sharpies are useful for labeling part containers. When filling multiple complex orders, I write the numbers on the bags to avoid confusion, and this seems better than picking the orders one by one.
    palmers9grb
  • koshkakoshka UK/SwedenMember Posts: 193
    A quick update as I contributed to this thread early on. I've had about 20 Bricklink sales over the 5-6 months that my store has been open. These have all been fairly small but high value orders for rarer modular related parts. I've sold a few regular parts but I've struggled to get this side of the store to take off.

    I've recently experimented with free tracked shipping for orders over 500 Swedish krona (about 50 euro). This has had little impact as the only sale was again for rare modular pieces even though they could have added extra pieces without incurring further shipping charges. 

    I've not added any charges but I did have a 50SKr minimum buy until recently. I've tried removing it for a week to see how things go. It's resulted in a 7SKr order from South Korea which is a bit strange as the shipping is double that and the parts aren't rare. I'm wondering whether it's some sort of test buy to see how reliable I am.

    Outside of Bricklink I've been using a Swedish version of ebay. It's more work but I've had a couple of hundred sales and I'm now in profit and have a decent volume of stock that should sell fairly easily over time. My original aim was to make enough profit to Bricklink Cafe Corner, Market Street, Green Grocer and the Taj Mahal. I'm now at the point where I think that I'll be able to achieve that and then I'll see if my motivation runs out.
    CupIsHalfEmptykiki180703PeteMKingAlanI77ncaachampsstluxchuckp
  • KingAlanIKingAlanI Rochester, NYMember Posts: 2,141
    I also get small foreign orders. Usually they don't actually pay, likely S&H sticker shock. Once, the buyer followed up with another small order. Most of my tiny domestic orders are successful one time things.
    Minimum buy is one thing I don't bother with. My handling charge ensures I make something, and the small orders are easy to fill.
    Do you get regular parts as a side effect of getting expensive parts? May as well sell those too.
  • 77ncaachamps77ncaachamps Aspiring Time Traveler Stuck in the West (US)Member Posts: 2,442
    I love reading this thread.

    It has now led me to decide to open a BL store.

    When I retire.
  • koshkakoshka UK/SwedenMember Posts: 193
    KingAlanI said:
    I also get small foreign orders. Usually they don't actually pay, likely S&H sticker shock. Once, the buyer followed up with another small order. Most of my tiny domestic orders are successful one time things.
    Minimum buy is one thing I don't bother with. My handling charge ensures I make something, and the small orders are easy to fill.
    Do you get regular parts as a side effect of getting expensive parts? May as well sell those too.
    They paid!! It was 9 pieces that I had sitting around as a by product of others sets I'd bought. The only real pain is filling out the customs form as it's outside the EU. The shipping from Sweden is pretty cheap for anything less than 50g.
    KingAlanI
  • KingAlanIKingAlanI Rochester, NYMember Posts: 2,141
    koshka said:
    KingAlanI said:
    I also get small foreign orders. Usually they don't actually pay, likely S&H sticker shock. Once, the buyer followed up with another small order. Most of my tiny domestic orders are successful one time things.
    Minimum buy is one thing I don't bother with. My handling charge ensures I make something, and the small orders are easy to fill.
    Do you get regular parts as a side effect of getting expensive parts? May as well sell those too.
    They paid!! It was 9 pieces that I had sitting around as a by product of others sets I'd bought. The only real pain is filling out the customs form as it's outside the EU. The shipping from Sweden is pretty cheap for anything less than 50g.
    Yeah, it's a pain to handwrite customs forms and wait while the postal clerk types it in. I particularly like printing labels for international packages, which I can't do through the PayPal website, but I can go to the USPS website and pay with PayPal.

    -

    Did some time studies
    It took me about 3 hours to pick 2 orders totaling 145 lots and 586 pieces. They were $51.91, $42.37 after fees and shipping expenses.
    It's taking me about 6 hours to sort 8 #41063 I'd parted out (159 lots 3280 pieces). Those cost $265.94 and listed for about double that.

  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,751
    Someone in Slovakia bought two McToran from me, and is surprised that shipping costs more that what he paid for them.

    How is anyone surprised when shipping across the ocean is more than $10?
    brumeyKingAlanIkiki180703stluxkbenjes
  • MattsWhatMattsWhat Studley, UKMember Posts: 1,643
    edited July 2016
    KingAlanI said:
    Did some time studies
    It took me about 3 hours to pick 2 orders totaling 145 lots and 586 pieces. They were $51.91, $42.37 after fees and shipping expenses.
    It's taking me about 6 hours to sort 8 #41063 I'd parted out (159 lots 3280 pieces). Those cost $265.94 and listed for about double that.

    SO, let's assume you sell every piece of those castles however unlikely that is... and that they take you the same amount of time as those order to pick (200 pieces an hour to pick and pack).
    You would have spent 6 hours sorting and around 15-18 hours packing, lets be generous and call that 20 hours all in.  So, if you sell at $265 you will be making $13 an hour for all that work.  And that was generous every step of the way, very generous in fact.

    I hope you enjoy your sorting and packing, else you'd probably be better off selling sets instead of parts! ;)
    SprinkleOtterKingAlanIkiki180703stlux
  • brumeybrumey AustriaMember Posts: 1,002
    edited July 2016
    bricklink down ?

    anybody else having problems getting to "my orders" or "messages"  ?



  • DaraghDaragh IrelandMember Posts: 363
    brumey said:
    bricklink down ?

    anybody else having problems getting to "my orders" or "messages"  ?



    Yes, running extremely slowly or I get 500 internal server error. 
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,751
    brumey said:
    bricklink down ?

    anybody else having problems getting to "my orders" or "messages"  ?



    Yep, but back up now.
  • Brickfan50Brickfan50 Zwolle, NetherlandsMember Posts: 338
    It's down for hours. To the OP: wait until the new BL is stable enough to handle your business. This may take some time. Weeks, months, years? I don't know. I'm just frustrated again...
  • DaraghDaragh IrelandMember Posts: 363
    @SprinkleOtter, not back here. Tried two PCs with different browsers. What is it about LEGO related websites, present company excepted of course. 

  • KingAlanIKingAlanI Rochester, NYMember Posts: 2,141
    MattsWhat said:
    KingAlanI said:
    Did some time studies
    It took me about 3 hours to pick 2 orders totaling 145 lots and 586 pieces. They were $51.91, $42.37 after fees and shipping expenses.
    It's taking me about 6 hours to sort 8 #41063 I'd parted out (159 lots 3280 pieces). Those cost $265.94 and listed for about double that.

    SO, let's assume you sell every piece of those castles however unlikely that is... and that they take you the same amount of time as those order to pick (200 pieces an hour to pick and pack).
    You would have spent 6 hours sorting and around 15-18 hours packing, lets be generous and call that 20 hours all in.  So, if you sell at $265 you will be making $13 an hour for all that work.  And that was generous every step of the way, very generous in fact.

    I hope you enjoy your sorting and packing, else you'd probably be better off selling sets instead of parts! ;)
    It did take more time than I expected.
    However, sealed sets have little margin, and shipping is a problem (especially compared to free shipping from major retailers). The clearance sticker could be a problem, both for box condition and a reminder of how much more the customer is paying.
    41063 is listed for $49, $46.11 after percentage PP and BL fees. Good compared to my cost of $33.24, but it's not actually selling at that price.
    I thought double was a good margin for parting out, maybe I should go higher.
    For the most part, this is work I like taking up goofing around time. Minimum wage is $9 where I am, that's what I'm making at my regular job, and better than what I could get doing other work for myself.

    Just parted out #70333 Ultimate Robin - got it for $7.54, parts listed for about $13. Spent about 15 minutes looking up prices, 41063 has about 4 times as many lots, so let's say an hour. That step is a major example of how it helps to have more pieces per lot, often from larger sets and/or multiple copies.
    Someone in Slovakia bought two McToran from me, and is surprised that shipping costs more that what he paid for them.

    How is anyone surprised when shipping across the ocean is more than $10?
    I put in my terms that postage to countries besides the US and Canada starts at $13-$13.75, but people don't read.

    brumey
  • KingAlanIKingAlanI Rochester, NYMember Posts: 2,141
    Given the same clearance percentage:
    Ninjago seems to have a particularly high part out value, maybe because of a lot of minifigures and unusual parts. Minecraft is a bit low, perhaps due to a lot of common blocks. City is quite low, possibly because the minifigs and regular pieces are both common. I don't have an answer for other themes, either due to a lack of data or inconsistency.
    Constraction figures don't seem worth it even if the raw numbers are good because of the super specialized pieces
  • KingAlanIKingAlanI Rochester, NYMember Posts: 2,141
    Bionicle also has a high part value if you can move the special pieces
    I'm not familiar with the BrickLink DUPLO market in general
    Here's my spreadsheet:
    http://www.mediafire.com/download/0zqhmg45t5nabac/Part+Out+Value+template.xlsx

  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,751
    ^ Old or new?
    KingAlanIkiki180703
  • KingAlanIKingAlanI Rochester, NYMember Posts: 2,141
    ^ Old or new?
    New. I'm talking about buying sealed sets on sale to part out. This is to help calculate what's a good deal for that. However, someone could do similar calculations for used sets.

  • Switchfoot55Switchfoot55 The Northwest, USAMember Posts: 2,305
    Running the risk of reviving an oldthread (not the oldest I could have), I had a few questions I wanted to pile on. 

    I was at a second hand store today and saw a large tub full of train track and monorail pieces (among some other odds and ends). The price was decent for what I thought was in there, so I took it home with me. I did a little searching on Bricklink and see that the contents are worth (looking at average prices) about 9 times what I paid for the box. I can't quite rub the dollar signs out of my eyes. 

    Fast forward a few hours, and reality is setting in. I have never sold on Bricklink and am wondering if the potential profits (even well below the average prices) justify the potential work of opening up a store. I really don't have anything else currently that I would put up for sale in my store, just the 400ish pieces or so that were in this box. Is it worth it? Would I ever get any interest or buyers?

    I'm doing research on actually opening a store to see what goes into that, but wanted to get the perspective of others who have used Bricklink much more than I have. 
    kbenjes
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,751
    Running the risk of reviving an oldthread (not the oldest I could have), I had a few questions I wanted to pile on. 

    I was at a second hand store today and saw a large tub full of train track and monorail pieces (among some other odds and ends). The price was decent for what I thought was in there, so I took it home with me. I did a little searching on Bricklink and see that the contents are worth (looking at average prices) about 9 times what I paid for the box. I can't quite rub the dollar signs out of my eyes. 

    Fast forward a few hours, and reality is setting in. I have never sold on Bricklink and am wondering if the potential profits (even well below the average prices) justify the potential work of opening up a store. I really don't have anything else currently that I would put up for sale in my store, just the 400ish pieces or so that were in this box. Is it worth it? Would I ever get any interest or buyers?

    I'm doing research on actually opening a store to see what goes into that, but wanted to get the perspective of others who have used Bricklink much more than I have. 
    If you payed $5 for the box, and it's worth $45, then no, it's not worth it. However, I suspect the box of parts is worth at least a couple hundred. You should be able to sell them on BL, but you may have to cut your prices, as you are new and have no other stock. There is a fair bit of work that goes into opening a BL store, though.

    Alternatively, you could try selling them here for less than BL...
  • DadsAFOLDadsAFOL USAMember Posts: 617
    The track will sell quickly, regardless of what else was in the bin.  Unless you want to sort, organize and inventory several bucket-fulls, you probably won't have enough variety to attract general buyers.   If you want the quick cash-in, just list the track and don't worry about everything else.
  • Switchfoot55Switchfoot55 The Northwest, USAMember Posts: 2,305
    I sorted through the bin tonight. It's mainly track with a few odds and ends, so not buckets of random pieces. 

    I can post a better list tomorrow, but in a nutshell it's monorail tracks and 4.5v train tracks with a few extra goodies from the associated sets. 

    Looking at the average prices on BL, the bin has about $350 worth of stuff with maybe $200 of that which seems to sell regularly. 

    Decisions decisions
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,751
    Keep in mind, BL is going to take 3% of your selling price (feebay even more), and you're going to have to have a way to ship all of these (and go through the hassle of shipping them)
  • asrfarinhaasrfarinha Galway, IrelandMember Posts: 140
    I'd like to bring up the subject of sales volume and how it's influenced by store size and other factors.

    I'm a fairly new BL seller, having been around about 6 months during which I had 30 orders. Started small but have been adding parts regularly, and am now at around 50k parts and close to 3k lots.
    Judging from previous posts in this thread and other bits of information gleaned here and there, the number 50k has been mentioned as the number of parts at which a sort of tipping point exists, and sales start trickling in. But I'm not seeing any of that. On the contrary, sales seem to have decreased in the last couple of months, while the store size is actually growing. Why would this be?
    Let's look at the factors that might be influencing it:
    • Price competitiveness
      I'm pricing parts at just under average, so I should be okay here?

    • Part variety/rarity
      Not much I can do here besides parting out different sets, which will come with time. Could this be making a big impact?
      Also, I only parted out new sets, so I don't have older parts that might be harder to find.

    • Trustworthiness
      At 32 feedback, 100% positive, this shouldn't be a problem, should it?

    • Seasonal trends
      With holiday festivities on the way are people spending less on BL? Has this been observed in previous years? Or is it because most stores are running deals, making the added difficulty of buying individual parts on BL less desirable?

    • Market saturation
      Have we reached a point where there are so many BL stores that sales are getting spread too thin?
    Any thoughts on this?

    I know there are a lot of factors to take into account, and there's no easy formula to determine the ideal size for a store, but just wanted to revive the conversation. And maybe uncover some market changes that might be occurring.
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