Please refrain from posting animated GIFs, memes, joke videos and so on in discussions other than those in the off topic area.

Dismiss this message to confirm your acceptance of this additional forum term of use.

Monthly Mini Builds No Longer Letting 5 Year Olds Build

koozkooz Connecticut, USAMember Posts: 158
My kids are 3 and 5. The 3 year old has trouble building and needs my help. The 5 year old is as good as any adult, at least in building the relatively easy MMBs. LEGO now won't let you register a 5 year old for MMBs due to "poor building experience." Which is bullsh**. Which will keep me out of the store. Which sours me on LEGO overall. And which is just a stupid move on their part, from a marketing perspective.
«1

Comments

  • koozkooz Connecticut, USAMember Posts: 158
    I did lie; we'll see if they call us on it. I'm aggravated beyond belief. I want to take a picture of all the MMBs my boys have built (about 5 for the little guy; a couple years worth with a few months missed here and there for the 5 year old) and send the picture with their "passports" to LEGO HQ along with a letter noting my VIP number and showing how there's a correlation between the MMB days and the THOUSANDS of stupid dollars I've spent on LEGO products (and yes, I understand it's a drop in the bucket, but it serves as an example--I'm sure I'm not alone).

    It's been a great company, but since they've become the "in" thing over the past year and a half or so, they seem to be focusing less on customer satisfaction and acting more like any old big company does. It sucks.
    SlapNutsdougtsbobabricks
  • akunthitaakunthita USAMember Posts: 1,025
    Yep, this is a new rule, although it is not enforced everywhere with the same strictness. As others have said; just lie. Although what does that teach to your kid? LEGO is putting kids and parents into a really weird predicament with this. Most 5-year-olds should have no problem building any of those MMB sets. And if they do have a problem they would either not be interested in the first place, or have someone help them. That's how you create life-long fans. Not by banning them or teaching them to lie...
    aimlesspursuitsTheBigLegoski
  • koozkooz Connecticut, USAMember Posts: 158
    Right. Also, when my 5 year old turns 6, I still can't take him! How can I do that when the 3 year old (who will then be 4) won't be able to go? Anyone with 2 kids knows it's really tough to let one do something and not the other, especially when they're both interested.

    So LEGO has basically ensured I have no reason to visit their stores for the next 3 years. STUPID.
  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    edited August 2015
    akunthita said:
    Yep, this is a new rule, although it is not enforced everywhere with the same strictness. As others have said; just lie. Although what does that teach to your kid? LEGO is putting kids and parents into a really weird predicament with this. Most 5-year-olds should have no problem building any of those MMB sets. And if they do have a problem they would either not be interested in the first place, or have someone help them. That's how you create life-long fans. Not by banning them or teaching them to lie...
    This is a bit of hyperbole I hope, because I don't think anyone is suggesting that we even engage the 5 year old in the knowledge that this "lie" is happening.  That being written, there's "teaching a kid to lie" and then there's teaching a kid to know when it might make non-harmful sense to "not be accurate," especially in the face of general stupidity.  Those children with a healthy knowledge of truth and consequences, and the wisdom to know when to stretch one or the other will be more equipped for success later in life imho.
  • koozkooz Connecticut, USAMember Posts: 158
    I cancelled my registration--I don't want to lie about the boys' ages, and don't want to visit the LEGO store. I hope this ends up hurting them in terms of registration for the event and potential customers in the door. That's the only way to get it changed.
    BrickDanceraimlesspursuitsMasterBeefy
  • BrickDancerBrickDancer Dunes of TatooineMember Posts: 3,639
    I've boycotted visiting the Lego Store as well for the past 2 years since their archaic 'No Discount' policy was enforced. The only power we have to voice our complaint with is dollars. So I've worked hard not to send any money directly to them since and buying from other vendors like Amazon & Target.
    kooz
  • dragonhawkdragonhawk USMember Posts: 633
    The MMB registration system enforces the age limit, but most likely the stores will not.  I would just enter a random number to get through the registration. I doubt the store employees would ban kids from participating in MMB due to age.
    ReesesPieces
  • ACWWGal2011ACWWGal2011 Member Posts: 534
    Aren't y'all over reacting over a rule?
  • binaryeyebinaryeye USMember Posts: 1,734
    Aren't y'all over reacting over a rule?
    I take it you don't have any kids.
    YodaliciousTheLoneTensoroldtodd33MasterBeefy
  • SlapNutsSlapNuts Triad NC, USAMember Posts: 40


    Sorry couldn't resist the pic ;) (I'll remove if not appropriate here)

    I've been excited to sign up my girlfriends kid until I saw this. He just turned 5 and would be one to need a little help, he has a hard time with some of the small pieces but is getting better the more he does it. Never saw the harm in taking him and helping him through it. 
    TheBigLegoski
  • MrShinyAndNewMrShinyAndNew Member Posts: 240
    My local Lego store doesn't check the ages. We waited until my daughter was old enough to participate before going and when we got there they offered my son a kit too, so both kids got to participate. I was slightly peeved that we'd missed out on previous builds she could have done.

    Since the online registration came up, I just put them both in as whatever the minimum age is. The employees at the store don't care, as long as the kid is at least 3 (I think) and what they're mainly interested in is safety, and that the kids can actually complete the build in a reasonable time. 
    SlapNuts
  • koozkooz Connecticut, USAMember Posts: 158
    This is a new rule--new this month (the enforcement). Before this, I'd register at their actual ages and had no problem. I suspect the stores have been told to enforce this policy.
  • ACWWGal2011ACWWGal2011 Member Posts: 534
    binaryeye said:
    Aren't y'all over reacting over a rule?
    I take it you don't have any kids.
    Correct
  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    edited August 2015
    rhe·tor·i·cal
    rəˈtôrək(ə)l/
    adjective: rhetorical

    • A question or otherwise semi-interrogative declaration posed in order to produce an effect or to make a statement rather than to elicit information.
    kiki180703Yodaliciousdougtsdragonhawkoldtodd33thedingman5Rainstorm26MasterBeefypharmjod
  • CM4SCM4S United StatesMember Posts: 1,274
    "poor building experience"

     :D 
    kiki180703
  • gmonkey76gmonkey76 ChicagoMember Posts: 1,393
    Anyone know if this stops going in the day after and getting one for free if you're an adult? 
  • SirBenSirBen In the Hall of the Mountain KingMember Posts: 548
    In July I just had to agree to terms that I wouldn't hold Lego responsible should my 4yo choke on her MMB pieces (she's had a blast playing with her kangaroo model), but I also experienced the "poor building experience" line when trying to register her for September's build. We'll see how she and the store handle the situation when her siblings are building in a couple weeks.
  • PhoneboothPhonebooth USMember Posts: 1,420
    First world problem. 
    andhe
  • DadsAFOLDadsAFOL USAMember Posts: 612
    gmonkey76 said:
    Anyone know if this stops going in the day after and getting one for free if you're an adult? 
    You've never been able to do that, so this has no impact on it.  The MMMB set is also used for the CLUB meetings on the 3rd & 4th Saturdays, so they aren't giving them free to anyone outside of the scheduled events.
  • gmonkey76gmonkey76 ChicagoMember Posts: 1,393
    ^ I've been able to do it two times (one for the LEGO movie build, and one for the Star Wars build). I was told by a LEGO employee that to come the day after and if they have any left that they give them out for free. When I got the LEGO Movie one they asked me how many I wanted, but I just took one. This was all before the preregister of kids.
  • tamamahmtamamahm Member Posts: 1,937
    Let me give two different perspectives.

    1) As a parent of a kid that has been building Lego sets since he was three, I would have been very frustrated that my 5 year old could not have come in and built.


    2) I had a Lego bday party when my son turned 5. Each child had their own small Lego set to build. The only child that built that kit by him/herself was my son. Every other child at the party had a parent helping out. Talking with parents during the year, the age of 5 was when kids might be just getting their first Lego set. This was changing by the time kids were nearing 6.
    The reality is that at 'group' events, many parents do not bother to check  to see if the child needs help, and the parent just does his/her own thing.  Based on my experience above, at  the age of 5 kids still needed parents their to help, unless we are talking about an experienced builder like your kids, my kids, are probably most younger kids that have parents on this board. I would bet that more time was being spent with 5 year olds where parents were not bothering to lend a hand, so yes, I do understand why they made the limit of 5. 


    Believe me, though, I understand why it is frustrating. I had at least two of my kids at 5 that could have built any kit...my one built the Winter Toy Shop at 5.



  • dragonhawkdragonhawk USMember Posts: 633
    ^ And here I thought MMB was supposed to be a once a month thing for parent(s) and child(ren) to bond over free LEGO.  
    dannyrwwmr.piggles
  • koozkooz Connecticut, USAMember Posts: 158
    Frankly, I thought it was a once a month thing to draw parents into the LEGO store with their kids, where the kids would then beg for various sets, which would be sold to the parents thereby making some money for LEGO.  This defeats that purpose.  Obviously defeats the higher-minded purposes of bonding, etc.
    gmonkey76andhedragonhawk
  • tamamahmtamamahm Member Posts: 1,937
    edited August 2015
    ^ And here I thought MMB was supposed to be a once a month thing for parent(s) and child(ren) to bond over free LEGO.  
    You would think. There are always parents that are going to use that time to bond, other kids that are self-sufficient enough that they want to do it on their own, and some parents that see it as a free toy and free baby-sitting time. There are a range of people out there, and enough incidents of the later with a child that needs to be helped through every step by an employee.... Yah, the age sadly goes up. :-( 


    Yes, I presume Lego original scheduled these to help draw in sales. 
    dragonhawk
  • dannyrwwdannyrww WisconsinMember Posts: 1,315
    So funny...I want to go and bond with my kids but they keep telling me they don't need my help anymore. 
  • koozkooz Connecticut, USAMember Posts: 158
    When my kids get LEGO Junior Magazine, I will expect there to be no references to age-inappropriate sets, since LEGO is so clearly concerned with ensuring my 5 year old doesn't build a set designed for 6 and up.
  • legoginlegogin Member Posts: 7
    Yeah my kids are effectively banned from these builds for several years because when the manager asks them how old they are they actually tell the truth and get denied.  Meanwhile I see small kids still wet behind the ears struggling at the table because their parent taught them the art of deception. LEGO is no longer make play but make lies with these MMB.  When push comes to shove I would rather have children I can respect than enjoying an outing and a free toy (plus the $1000 or so I was dropping every month on new sets in store).
  • PhoneboothPhonebooth USMember Posts: 1,420
    Ok, let's be honest with ourselves here. For those complaining, TLG is offering a FREE program to get Lego into
    the hands of young children while PROMOTING the healthy bonding with their parent(s). 

    @kooz - I'm sorry that your children are too young, but to bash a company for a philanthropic program is simply absurd. 

    Yes, this program has age limits.  And yes, it would be great if some younger children were able to attend.

    But it for those complaining, please stop. Be appreciative that this program exists. If it's so horrible, you can stop buying Lego and go attend all the MMB at the Mega Block store. oh wait... 
    kiki180703VorpalRyu
  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    Or, we could continue to interestingly debate how arbitrary age limits don't always reflect the actual situation of an individual.  The fact that this program is free has nothing to do with it.

    Also, just because the viewpoints don't align with yours, doesn't mean they should "stop."
    koozdougtsMasterBeefyDedgeckooldtodd33tamamahmdragonhawk
  • BACbrixBACbrix AmericaMember Posts: 655
    I say this is a good rule. I mean Lego is designed for adults only. I am tired of little kids taking all of the product and then reselling it for profit and not letting others enjoy it without having to pay crazy AM prices. 
    gmonkey76mr.piggleskiki180703dougtsMasterBeefyDedgeckoToc13
  • PhoneboothPhonebooth USMember Posts: 1,420
    @TheLoneTensor - unfortunately, I disagree. I'm tired of people complaining and do feel they should stop. 

    It's the American way these days to bemoan every little situation where someone feels slighted, wrong, or put-out. Entitlement gone overboard.  Read the comments IN THIS THREAD ALONE.

    Im simply offering an alternative perspective that we ALL should be appreciative that Lego - a company that we all respect, given participation on this site - offers such outreach and developmental programs at no cost to the consumer.

    There is so much negativity around a company that fosters and promotes children's play.  Anyone can complain until the cows come home, but I would challenge all the above to find a positive, alternative solution.
    VorpalRyu
  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    edited August 2015
    I guess you could have said all that without the "But it for those complaining, please stop."  Sharing "complaining" thoughts about perceived unfairness helps people cope, and no, it's not entitlement, and it's not just the American way (really, c'mon, that wasn't necessary).  It's when it gets personal or really dirty, that's when it should really stop, but that hasn't happened here yet, right?

    Really, I'm enjoying learning about the way folks are interacting with their kids (and ages, and Lego), and find it interesting in comparison to how I interact with mine (and ages, and Lego).  If gaining that insight means I have to sift through some chaff, it's worth it imho.
    dougtsMasterBeefyFizyx
  • PhoneboothPhonebooth USMember Posts: 1,420
    edited August 2015
    I guess that we can agree to disagree then.  

    I am glad that you enjoy this presentation of perspective, but the litany of complaints simply makes me sad about the stance and trajectory of our society.
    MasterBeefy
  • koozkooz Connecticut, USAMember Posts: 158
    This is not about entitlement. LEGO has provided the MMB program, not out of any sense of altruism, but as a business decision. It is not designed to promote bonding, it is designed to bring more people into the store and get more money.

    The program is continuing, but an age limit is being instituted because people were not building quickly enough--slower builders means people waiting in line and not shopping.

    So, to move things along quicker, they impose an age restriction. They then claim it's there because new pieces and laws are in place preventing them from offering this to younger kids. There is no chance that's true since last month (when there was preregistration but no age limit). It also isn't true based on LEGO marketing age-inappropriate sets to younger kids. 

    In sum--MMB is designed to increase the bottom line. Slow builders keep MMB from maximizing its potential. Thus the age restriction, which hypothetically keeps slower builders out. 

    Honest discussion about this should not be dismissed as entitlement or complaining.


  • PhoneboothPhonebooth USMember Posts: 1,420
    ^this is not honest discussion. It's two perspectives:

    Yours being - Lego does nothing altruistically and cares so little about the world that they have the audacity of executing a global program targeted toward parents of young children in which they specifically design MMB sets that they provide at no cost for participants. 

    Pretty bleak. 
  • DedgeckoDedgecko Seattle, WAMember Posts: 799
    @Phonebooth ;If you believe this is about bonding and not about getting people in and out of the store in a metered manor you're mistaken.  No longer is there a line wrapping its way throughout the mall, or around the block.  People are there, when they need to be there per their scheduled slot.  Before and after they are free to peruse the latest wares.  That's more time in front of product and less time standing in line listening to your kids say "are we there yet..." over and over again.  TLG has been driving efficiency in all of its products, and the MMB is no different.

    We ourselves have never been, my eldest is 4, but she has no problems soloing a tribe of Mixels.  The last time we were in the store we were given June and July's MMB by one of the Brick Specialist, awesome guy!!, and I was encouraged to sign my daughter up, fudging her birthdate accordingly.  Or if I had any moral concerns, I was told to swing by the day after, or even after the latest reservation time (I think it's wrapped up after 7 or 7:30) and see if there were any extras from no-shows.

    OP - It really depends on the store, you have a crappy one, and I think you should move.  Or stop whining, it's a poly bag, not the end of the world.
    kooz
  • PhoneboothPhonebooth USMember Posts: 1,420
    Ok, I'm just going to say one last thing and then I'm going to be finished with this thread.  It's my job to evaluate the efficiency of marketing programs for businesses.  I statistically evaluate how well marketing programs hit key objectives, whether those objectives are sales, brand equity, product awareness, etc. 

    I work for for one of the biggest marketing analytics companies that services the largest sdvertisers in the world. This is exactly my area of expertise. 

    Every program should have an impact on the business, but not all corporations are so nefarious that their only motive is to drive "footfall" into the store. 

    Most at companies have community programs that are an attempt to "give back".  The NFL has their Play 60 initiatives.  MLB lets kids and parents "run the bases" after games.  Lego has ambassadors that provide services to the community, of which Brickset is one. 

    Yes, the MMB likely generates some in-store sales, but they are likely to 1) be small and 2) probably would have happened anyway.  given the high cost to run the program, amd its limited reach (have to live near a store to participate!), it's far from the core of Lego's marketing plan - and it's likely not even funded from the marketing OPS budget. 

    It saddens me that so much anger and irritation comes from a select few that can't participate, or feel that the rules are so unfair that they hold the company accountable. these individuals would likely be the most vocal if Lego DIDNT have an MMB program.  

    Ill end with these two last points. First, i personally love that Lego drives corporate initiatives that give back to the community.  I think that we are very lucky to be so compassionate about Lego, and for having Lego able and willing to "give back" and drive curiosity and learning in children, while also providing an event to bring children and parents together. 

    Second, as a new parent, I'm really looking forward to particpating in MMB and sharing my love of the brick.  It worries me that some shirk the rules, the age limits, and put the program In jeopardy. But I also know that for every outspoken critic, there are hundreds - if not thousands - of parents that are appreciative of Lego's efforts to give back. 

  • legoginlegogin Member Posts: 7

    It saddens me that so much anger and irritation comes from a select few that can't participate, or feel that the rules are so unfair that they hold the company accountable. these individuals would likely be the most vocal if Lego DIDNT have an MMB program.  

    Ill end with these two last points. First, i personally love that Lego drives corporate initiatives that give back to the community.  I think that we are very lucky to be so compassionate about Lego, and for having Lego able and willing to "give back" and drive curiosity and learning in children, while also providing an event to bring children and parents together. 

    Second, as a new parent, I'm really looking forward to particpating in MMB and sharing my love of the brick.  It worries me that some shirk the rules, the age limits, and put the program In jeopardy. But I also know that for every outspoken critic, there are hundreds - if not thousands - of parents that are appreciative of Lego's efforts to give back. 


    It's funny that you mention that you're a new parent.  Maybe you'll understand when your children are a little older and feel start feeling the world is not fair like it is in a Winnie the Pooh book.

    My job involves caring for others and involves ethics and morality. Others have stated above that they're not particularly upset with the age restriction but rather the way it is arbitrarily done.  I personally don't get emotional over their decision to place an age restriction.  I believe in capitalism and when in their stores you are standing on their private property - they're not obliged to do anything other than not violate you civil rights.

    My issue with this whole age restriction was that if they're going to enforce it, perhaps they should be more organized.  Maybe have parents bring in a birth certificate copy and get a one time stamp in their passport allowing them to go to all future MMB.

    It's difficult to rationalize with a 5 and 4 year old who can oddly can adeptly build technic sets made for 10 year olds.  They see other kids who are smaller than them standing at the table even though we had a reservation and were rejected by the manager because my 5 year old was 2 months shy of 6 years.  Meanwhile there's a kid who can barely see above the table struggling.  Just looking at the kids dentition when he opened his mouth I could tell he was not even 4.

    So either the parent lied, the child lied or the rules are not being consistently enforced.
    I care not for entitlement.  I am an American and believe in the PURSUIT of happiness, not the guarantee of happiness. But the playing field should be level - something that a computer could discern in 2 picoseconds with a birthdate.  I walked away from the store explaining to my kids for the next 2 days about how people lie to get ahead in the world.  I had to reference villains in Disney movies and show how they deceived the hero in the movie.

    I went to a different Lego store the same day looking for a HTF set and they actually invited my kids to open spots for the MMB.  My 5 year old blurted out that she wasn't 6 and the Lego employee said it wasn't a problem.

    So while I appreciated the kind gesture, I still complained to the manager (who I had become friends with) that I thought they needed to become more consistent with their policy.  Now if they said it was per each individual store manager's discretion then that is their choice - but all the managers insist the decision is made by TLG and non negotiable...pfft.

    Laws are great.  Selective enforcement not so much.
    dougts
  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    edited August 2015
    I guess that we can agree to disagree then. 
    ...
    Ok, I'm just going to say one last thing
    So...what happened to "let's agree to disagree," and before that, you asking that we should "stop?"  Usually those kinds of statements aren't followed by a "one last thing..." diatribe.

    For the record again, I actually like the discussion, even back and forth ones, but don't pretend to hold to some conversational code of honor, and then immediately lob another salvo.
    BACbrixkooztamamahmdougtsFizyx
  • koozkooz Connecticut, USAMember Posts: 158
    I emailed TLG about it and said I was disappointed. Here's the first response:

    "Thanks for getting in touch with us. I'm incredibly sorry to hear about how upset you are about our new mini build policy. I completely agree with you that the age requirement should just be a recommendation, but unfortunately it's currently just a safety restriction. Here is exactly how it's stated on our website: 'Due to the small parts and new safety regulations children under 6 years old will not be able to participate in this event. Even with chaperone supervision they will no longer be able to register, as the age grading for these builds are appropriate for ages 6-14.' Although you can bring the sets home with you and build them I do understand it's definitely not the same. I hope sometime in the near future we can work something out where anyone who wants can join the minibuild. I definitely appreciate your comments and will forward them on."

    I responded with this: 

    "Thanks for replying, Ryan. 

    Below is a screen shot indicating that '...children ages 3-5 will no longer be able to participate ... due to poor building experience.'

    I wonder what new parts and new safety regulations have come into being since last month, when this was all okay. I suspect none. I suspect that's a retroactive explanation to make the real decision (based on speeding things up, judging by both the registration requirement and the response in the screenshot) more palatable to people. ('Oh, it isn't LEGO's fault; it's those pesky new regulations!') 

    The practical effect is that not only do we not have an excuse to visit a LEGO store now, but I can't see us visiting for the next 3 years! Even when the oldest can do a MMB (next year), I can't take him, as I can't leave his brother (who isn't old enough) at home, and I certainly can't bring him and NOT let him do what his brother gets to do. (This is a toy company; how did nobody think that part through?) Especially since he's been doing it for months and knows it's been okay. This policy is costing the company money--it's directly affecting the bottom line. We will be in the store less often, we will be spending less money, my boys won't be as into LEGOs so they won't be asking for them at holidays and birthdays. It's a bad, poorly conceived policy."

    The second LEGO response:

    "Thanks for getting in touch with us. We appreciate your feedback on this, and I understand where you are coming from. It sends the wrong message when the wording on the registration page states nothing about safety and only poor building experience. I have forwarded your feedback on to the team in charge of LEGO® stores.
    It was never our intent to disappoint or discourage our fans with the new Monthly Minibuild process. Please know that your voice is being heard."

    A redacted version of the attachment I sent is attached here.



  • cmrt1014cmrt1014 Member Posts: 396
    kooz said:
     Although you can bring the sets home with you and build them I do understand it's definitely not the same.
    Sorry for the drastic cutting, but this jumped out at me.

    Wait, I thought part of the new registration process is that the model HAD to be built in store?

    So what can the set be brought home?

    Disclaimer:  My youngest turns 14 next month, so this is all moot for us.  We don't live near a store either, so anytime we did make it was a treat.
    dragonhawk
  • nexandernexander Glasgow Member Posts: 871
    I'm curious what small parts are not suitable for a 5 year old but fine for a 6 year old. I get the idea of under 3's and small parts (studs and small noses) but a 5 year old? If that's a proper regulation then how are kids going to learn by them being mollycoddled so much? My youngest has been playing with with full Lego for a year (he isn't even 3 1/2 yet) without any 'safety' issues, just the lack of strength and coordination to put studs on and off until he was a bit older. I can see the build experience issue being valid as not all kids have afol parents but more discretion needs to be applied.
  • tamamahmtamamahm Member Posts: 1,937
    What a bunch of BS. 

    I may just send an email to Lego expressing my extreme concern over the safety of Lego, since I have heard of the new safety issues of a Lego mini-build for 5 year old kids, yet there are still selling larger city sets with these dangerous items targeted for 5 year olds. * roll eyes* 

    I get saying that younger kids are negatively impacting the overall build experience so they had to raise the age. 
    Just call it like it is, instead of trumped up excuses.

    Plus, if the issue was safety, they would have never touted the fact that they believe these build are for 6 up.


    As for the entire rathole of 'complaints'. People can express multiple viewpoint on a company and not be happy with one aspect, but pleased with another. There is nothing wrong with the discussion of a topic. 
    kiki180703
  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    edited August 2015
    kooz said (TLG said):

    ...it's currently just a safety restriction.
    This is the funniest thing I read all day.
    kiki180703Dedgecko
  • ReesesPiecesReesesPieces Member Posts: 758
    If the age restriction is a sudden change, something must of happened somewhere.  With the amount of frivolous lawsuits, I wouldn't be surprised something happened that led Lego to this decision.  It is giveaway so it doesn't affect them greatly whose hands these end up in (age wise) so I'm guessing there is a reason. Kind of like McDonald's having to warn people that their hot coffee is actually hot.
  • TigerMothTigerMoth Member Posts: 2,343
    It doesn't need to have happened, just that someone has realised that it could. Or someone could create or fake the situation. One of the last things TLG needs is any sort of media story about safety of LEGO or the stores.
    ReesesPieces
  • TheLoneTensorTheLoneTensor MericaMember Posts: 3,950
    Great, does this mean I can sue Lego for all the foot damage and emotional distress I've received as a result of stepping on their clearly unsafe bricks?
    dannyrwwcloaked7dragonhawkkiki180703Dedgeckojesirose
  • dragonhawkdragonhawk USMember Posts: 633
    dannyrww said:
    So funny...I want to go and bond with my kids but they keep telling me they don't need my help anymore. 
    They only said that until they needed help with the 1x1 cheese slopes or Technic pins :D

    However, the bonding does necessarily mean helping to build.  With older kids it can be about how interesting the build is or the techniques used in the builds. :)

    dannyrwwkiki180703
  • dannyrwwdannyrww WisconsinMember Posts: 1,315
    dannyrww said:
    So funny...I want to go and bond with my kids but they keep telling me they don't need my help anymore. 
    They only said that until they needed help with the 1x1 cheese slopes or Technic pins :D

    However, the bonding does necessarily mean helping to build.  With older kids it can be about how interesting the build is or the techniques used in the builds. :)


    This is true... I just like being there with them. We actually enjoyed waiting in line because it was time to talk and hang out after a busy day at school (My boss actually allowed me to leave early on those days so I could get in line).
    dragonhawkkiki180703
Sign In or Register to comment.
Recent discussions Categories Privacy Policy