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# of sets LEGO produces

Vindic8edVindic8ed Member Posts: 163
edited January 2015 in Collecting
Are there statistics anywhere about how many sets are produced when LEGO releases a new set?

IE, How many Slave 1 did they produce? There are probably multiple things that come into play when they decide how many they will make (supply and demand) but I was just curious if there were any stats on how many of which sets were released.

One thing that comes to mind are the LEGO Idea sets. The Research Lab was very popular, and they released that on two separate occasions and are no longer going to produce it. Any idea how many they actually produced for that set (or what the average is for the LEGO Ideas sets in general)?

Comments

  • Vindic8edVindic8ed Member Posts: 163
    Nothing? Not even a hint as to how many Research Institute sets were made? They had two releases of the set and both sold out extremely fast and now they are now longer producing it.
  • ShibShib UKMember Posts: 5,288
    The only people who could answer this would be people who work at Lego, and even then to get definitive answers you'd be looking at a very small number of people who have access to correct data.

    Some people have hinted at the idea that sets from Ideas (at least those not from a licenced IP) have a set number per run and initially only get one run. Both the Exo Suit and Research institute got an additional run - with the Exo-Suit seeming to get more, and to be honest I've seen nothing official to say that the RI won't get another but you have to keep in mind that TLG's factories have been running full capacity and struggling to keep up with demand.

    The other thing is that while Lego do sometimes follow patterns more often than not from an outside perspective the decisions on things like amounts of sets produced or when sets get EOLed will seem completely random.



    Short answer - no.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 18,314
    I'm not even sure that the idea about two runs for the Research Institute is correct. That is how it looked to consumers. But we don't know if sets were made and sold, and then some time later if more sets were made and then sold. For all we know there was continuous production of the set, with sets being shipped to different parts of the world at different times (as availability dates are different in different parts of the world). So I'm not sure it is correct to say it was released on two separate occasions. That is just how it appears to consumers when they are shopping for something.
  • piratemania7piratemania7 New EnglandMember Posts: 2,098
    Remember. LEGO bricks need to be made. It's not so much the packaging, the warehouse, the assembly of sets into boxes, etc. it's really all about producing the bricks. That takes time and the molds can only do so much. Even running 24/7.

    I think you can find a number of threads that speaks to this and other parameters around what TLG really does. Truth is? No one really knows. It's a privately held family company. No need rhyme or reason to disclose anything to the likes of us!

    Anyway, off my rant, point being, who knows what TLG produces or not and what their numbers are. I'm sure they have some metric somewhere that allows for the fair production of bricks at certain times. I'm sure they go through waves or phases of concentrating on certain bricks and/or sets.
  • Vindic8edVindic8ed Member Posts: 163
    Thanks for the replies! =)
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