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Best way to sort a minifig job lot ?

hardwaxhardwax ScotlandMember Posts: 10
I recently got a job lot of about 100 minifigs and other Lego, very few are assembled as complete figures and I dont trust them to be correct. Its mostly heads, legs and sometimes torso's with no arms. I have an idea what sets many of them came from but Brickset often doesn't show the head type for figures with helmets e.g. the Royal Guard from 6211 SW040. On checking at Bricklink the inventory shows its just a plain black head but thats a pretty longwinded approach. Anyone got any better ideas ?

Comments

  • MojoestMojoest UKMember Posts: 474
    edited November 2014
    Have you got the DK Minifgure book? I have found that a good starting point for distinguishing the theme a figure is from (easiest with torsos) as you can quickly flick through. I then use Brickset to search that theme. Also I have found in the job lots I've had that most of the figures are usually then within a few years of each other, so once you've found one its easier to find others. Like you say BL then comes in last if there is a specific part to ID.

    Still quite a long winded process, but ok to kill some time on the sofa of an evening and I enjoy the sense of achievement once its done, (and hopefully finding that just a couple of the figures are actually worth what I paid for the whole lot :-) ).

    I'm sure others will have better methods
  • TarDomoTarDomo FinlandMember Posts: 515
    edited November 2014
    Brickset => 6211 => Parts
    Click the "in -- sets" and take a look if you have one of those sets. Then compare the heads: if they are looking same, it is the piece you´re looking for.
    Also the number of the headpiece shown at the "Parts" might help to find a better picture of the head from Ebay or some Lego site.
  • TheBrokenPlateTheBrokenPlate Member Posts: 28
    edited November 2014
    Usually I'll use Bricklink, and go through the torsos one at a time, if I don't know what they're from.
    Select catalog-->color-->select the torso color-->select 'minifig, torso assembly'-->select 'thumbnail gallery'...and select the correct torso there.
    Then you can see what figs it was used in and go from there.
    It's time consuming, but it's systematic and may save you time in the long run.
  • BobflipBobflip Member Posts: 610
    I recently had to sort through a bunch of random minifigs for the first time. Took a while, but definitely rewarding! I found a few little ways that helped. Some minifigs end up being easier to identify than others, so don't too long on the first few, get a few easy ones out the way first and work from there.

    You can narrow it down to themes from this page on Bricklink

    http://www.bricklink.com/catalogTree.asp?itemType=M

    When you've identified a figure, you can check the sets it's appeared in for other minifigs you might have in the bundle.

    There's also things like checking a loose part against which minifigs it has been used in. For example, here's all the minifigs with dark red legs:

    http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItemIn.asp?P=970c00&in=M&colorID=59&ov=Y
  • hardwaxhardwax ScotlandMember Posts: 10
    Thanks for the tips.
  • prevereprevere North of Bellville, East of Heartlake, South of Bricksburg, West of Ninjago City Member Posts: 2,922
    I've having a hard time keeping minifig parts, especially heads organized. We're talking a large quantity of heads. I now have them sorted by process of elimination through identification by categories (eyewear / red-blue-orange-green coloring / brown-white-black-gray / black only ... yellow and flesh are separated).

    But with the increase in dual-sided heads, and more and more and more expressions - this is getting tougher and tougher. Looking for any magical (or better) solutions you've found.
  • BobflipBobflip Member Posts: 610
    Maybe someone needs to code a database with a Guess Who style interface!
    Shib
  • The_Mad_VulcanThe_Mad_Vulcan SeattleMember Posts: 162
    ^That could be really useful for the reverse process as well, say if somebody were doing a MOC and wanted a Male head with a mustache and wanted to see all the options that TLG made in order to pick the best fit.
    Shib
  • BobflipBobflip Member Posts: 610
    Yeah, that's a good thought as well!
  • BritcomBritcom Member Posts: 28
    Once you have a sorting system in place it becomes easier, although is still long winded. I bought a lot of 160 figures last week. I normally only search for the torso's on Bricklink. I do this one colour at a time, looking for each torso and then build the figures from there. Changing the arms, hands, legs etc. as necessary. This, I find, is a lot easier than looking for a whole figure or even complete torso's.
  • donutboydonutboy U.K.Member Posts: 762
    Best way to sort a minifig job lot ?

    Get the kids involved ;-)
  • plasmodiumplasmodium UKMember Posts: 1,942
    Torsos is good, but legs is better (if they're printed), because printed legs (until recently) were rare, making it easier to identify where they come from.
  • hardwaxhardwax ScotlandMember Posts: 10
    Here us a photo of what I am starting with. Made up some totem poles with the heads by colour/facial hair/eyewear. The tub 2nd from top left is 'complete' figs but I will check they are legit and no mismatched heads etc. Next tub is torso's with legs already attached, next is torsos only. Will check legs with prints if I get stuck.

    image
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