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How does Lego sort and package its sets?

OhmydentistOhmydentist Member Posts: 6
edited June 2014 in Everything else LEGO
I'm sure this question was asked before. Could anyone point to good sources?

I heard Lego works with 6800 pieces lot, so I imagine Lego factory has 6800 giant containers for each piece and computer tells which containers to spit out pieces into bags?

Comments

  • MatthewMatthew Cheshire, UKAdministrator Posts: 3,734
    edited June 2014
    This documentary aired a few years ago and covers LEGO's design and production process.

    LEGO has a robot controlled parts warehouse, featured in this article and seen here.
    Natebw
  • OhmydentistOhmydentist Member Posts: 6
    interesting watch, thanks for the link
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 18,231
    It's just propaganda, they actually use 6800 trained monkeys. :-)
    Matthewbobabricks
  • fizicystfizicyst Member Posts: 72
    CCC said:

    It's just propaganda, they actually use 6800 trained monkeys. :-)

    Stop making thing up, we all know it is really all done by the world's most advanced artificial intelligence...Master Mold!


    dannyrwwy2joshbobabricks
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,830
    Carefully. :P
  • byucougsbyucougs Member Posts: 38
    That video was cool. Thanks. I was wondering still, why does Lego use different type of bags. For example, some pieces are placed in solid plastic bags while others are put in bags with holes in them, like the pieces need to breathe. Does anyone know why?
  • KiwiLegoMeisterKiwiLegoMeister New ZealandMember Posts: 212
    I think I read somewhere that when packaging each set, there is a highly accurate computer weighing (I reckon - probably to the 1/100th of a gram) about 3-4 times in the packaging process to ensure boxes are not missing any parts.
    If you've got self scanning checkout at supermarkets (we have in New Zealand), this is a similar process - when you scan an item and place it on the bagging side, the computer knows that what you've placed matches what you've scanned.
    This means in the Lego process, the chance of a lost brick is basically zero. You might get a wrong colour, but not a wrong brick.
    This is why, in another thread, I think the chance of "how often have you receive a missing or broken brick in a set" is nil. Such a set would be automatically rejected by this weighing process, and sent back into the great melting pot in the sky.
  • bobabricksbobabricks Vancouver, BC, CanadaMember Posts: 1,839
    I love the drama at the end with the production line, they should make it a reality show XD
  • bobabricksbobabricks Vancouver, BC, CanadaMember Posts: 1,839
    @KiwiLegoMeister that entire process sounds solid and it is but like any factory, something is bound to slip through.
  • VenunderVenunder Nottingham, UK.Member Posts: 2,506
    In the last two years I have found one problem piece.
    It was a half molded connector and lego always include a spare.
    So it was not a problem. :)
  • bobabricksbobabricks Vancouver, BC, CanadaMember Posts: 1,839
    @Venunder That sounds interesting, maybe not enough plastic went into the machine.
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