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21110 Research Institute

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Comments

  • theLEGOmantheLEGOman UKMember Posts: 1,520

    The current freebies also make 21109 and 21110 more desirable. 21109 seems to have achieved normality at £55 on ebay, and selling quite well. Add in the mini-mini for £8-10, and you can almost double your money after fees for a very quick flip. 21110 is now harder to find, making it quite likely that it'll have bigger gains if the interest in it doesn't wane. The low RRPs and therefore (relatively low) reseller prices keep these sets in the realms of impulse buys. You'll sweat over buying a £55 21109 or £35 21110 far less than a £2000 10179 or £500 10212.

    I have a couple of each, maybe I should get them sold.
  • bellybutton290bellybutton290 Member Posts: 453
    got an RI in stratford westfield last night more were on the shelf not loads though maybe a dozen. they were received in yesterdays delivery to store so i was told.
  • LostInTranslationLostInTranslation UKMember Posts: 5,568
    My [email protected] order for a single RI has changed from Backordered to In Process. Hopefully I'll be getting it soon :-)
    SirKevbagsShibPitfall69
  • ShibShib UKMember Posts: 5,331
    I'm hoping the RI might pop back. Into stock around payday long enough to get an order in, the future mother in law saw a news story about it and really liked it so was hoping to get her one for Xmas...no loss if I can't get one though.
    david325lego007
  • TheBrickLaddTheBrickLadd Chippenham, Wilts, UK.Member Posts: 844
    Just managed to order one from [email protected] Gone again now.
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 9,782
    teamladd said:

    Just managed to order one from [email protected] Gone again now.

    Interesting, Which country is this in? If you could keep us informed as to whether the order goes through and is sent, would appreciate it. As it would be useful to know if these are popping up on [email protected] from time to time.
  • TheBrickLaddTheBrickLadd Chippenham, Wilts, UK.Member Posts: 844
    Just after I ordered I came to post it but it went out of stock again as I had refreshed the page.

    Im in the UK. Payment has been taken but currently says back ordered. I thought they take payment on dispatch!
  • BillybrownBillybrown UKMember Posts: 748
    teamladd said:

    Just after I ordered I came to post it but it went out of stock again as I had refreshed the page.

    Im in the UK. Payment has been taken but currently says back ordered. I thought they take payment on dispatch!

    The money comes out of your account as a pending transaction (pre-authorisation) in the same way as Amazon do. When dispatched the money officially goes from pending to being released.

    Its confusing when Lego say that the payment won't come out until dispatch, because in effect it already has done, and the money is put aside until they authorise despatch

  • DadDad UKMember Posts: 815
    ^ This.

    My [email protected] order for a single RI has changed from Backordered to In Process. Hopefully I'll be getting it soon :-)

    Mines been 'in process' since August 1st!!!

  • starwarfan77starwarfan77 Member Posts: 341
    Dad said:

    ^ This.

    My [email protected] order for a single RI has changed from Backordered to In Process. Hopefully I'll be getting it soon :-)

    Mines been 'in process' since August 1st!!!

    you should call them and find out what's going on.

    there is too much shenanigan with the way TLG processes order.

    in short i have called them and logical reasoning and proof i have been able to get the order shipped within next business day.
    i am not saying it happened with RI but with some other set.

    madforLEGO
  • LostInTranslationLostInTranslation UKMember Posts: 5,568
    Dad said:

    ^ This.

    My [email protected] order for a single RI has changed from Backordered to In Process. Hopefully I'll be getting it soon :-)

    Mines been 'in process' since August 1st!!!

    Oh :-(
  • DadDad UKMember Posts: 815
    I picked 2 up at the Manchester store the following week so I suppose the reason I've not called is I'm not too bothered whether they ship them or not. Do need to call and sort it though!!
  • LostInTranslationLostInTranslation UKMember Posts: 5,568
    Order status = Shipped :-))
    cheshirecatSirKevbags
  • BillybrownBillybrown UKMember Posts: 748
    edited August 2014
    If anyone has any spare RI's they are willing to part with, then PM me and let me know how much you want. I'm not getting any dates from Lego. Im told early September for there next delivery but I think that depends on what back orders they have to fill.
  • monkeyhangermonkeyhanger Member Posts: 2,939
    edited August 2014
    Billy: I doubt Lego will ship you more than 5 when (if) they do get stock. You're not so bothered about the Exosuits?
  • BillybrownBillybrown UKMember Posts: 748

    You're not so bothered about the Exosuits?

    I'm sorted with Exosuits. They arrived safe and sound.

  • margotmargot Member Posts: 2,310
    New Yorkers, ready...set....go!
    From a NYT article:
    "A Toys “R” Us spokeswoman, Kathleen Waugh, said in an email that it would be available in about a week at the company’s Times Square and F.A.O. Schwarz stores.".
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 9,782
    edited August 2014
    Thx @margot, but just to be clear what will be available? The 21110 RI or the 21109 Exo Suit (as it seems they tend to leak into one another's thread)
  • margotmargot Member Posts: 2,310
    edited August 2014
    #21110 RI.
    Within days of its appearance early this month, the Research Institute — a paleontologist, an astronomer and a chemist — sold out on Lego’s website and will not be available at major retailers, including Target and Walmart.

    A chemist is among three scientists in the Research Institute set. Credit Lego
    Toys “R” Us did carry the line, but according to associates reached by telephone at two of its New York stores, it sold out at those locations as well.

    A Toys “R” Us spokeswoman, Kathleen Waugh, said in an email that it would be available in about a week at the company’s Times Square and F.A.O. Schwarz stores.

    Lego said the set was manufactured as a limited edition, meaning it was not mass-produced. The true enthusiast can still buy the Research Institute at Amazon.com, however, but for about three times its $19.99 retail price.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/22/business/short-lived-science-line-from-lego-for-girls.html?_r=0
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 9,782
    edited August 2014
    Thanks for the clarification @margot, but is it then only going to be available in NY?
  • BrickDancerBrickDancer Dunes of TatooineMember Posts: 3,639
    RI is available in DT Disney as well as Exo
  • roxioroxio UKMember Posts: 1,348
    got shipping notification yesterday from UK [email protected] for RIs ordered 7 Aug :)
  • BRCBRC Member Posts: 125
    edited August 2014
    Australia might get this set in 2018.
  • margotmargot Member Posts: 2,310
    A couple of interesting videos on Lego and gender. (Part 2 in particular) Just ignore the constant use of "Legos".

    Natebw
  • NatebwNatebw Tampa BayMember Posts: 339
    Definitely hard to argue with those videos. But it is also hard to argue with strong sales: http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/business/2012/09/lego-friends-triples-sales-to-girls-despite-feminist-critique/
  • margotmargot Member Posts: 2,310
    ^Oh, no doubt.. that's what it's all about. The video about segmenting markets talked about that, the whole reason they do it is because it greatly increases profit.
    Natebw
  • NatebwNatebw Tampa BayMember Posts: 339
    I just watched a few other of her videos. She's good. The video on female NPC in video games was pretty damning. I'm not a gamer, so I was pretty surprised in the clips she showed.
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 9,782
    Of course, I hear none of this about MB, or KREO either. So I guess it does signal one thing: LEGO is still on the top of the totem pole.

    First, if you want the the true nature of the message here in the above videos, only watch from about 8 minutes into the 2nd part on. Will save you a lot of time as that is really the only worthwhile part to watch IMO.
    As for the rest.
    The argument about the sets being designed for one purpose actually expands across ALL lines for LEGO today, not just friends. Unless you count the 2n1 sets for the movie itself.
    Regarding houses, LEGO has not sold many houses under 'city' line BUT do have plenty of houses under the Creator line which are minifigure scale (which she FINALLY mentions after about the 13 minute mark in part 2).
    As for the new ads vs old? Well I see that as an entirely different issue, not gender related, which is a prevalence of violence in our culture.
    I get some of the arguments: no fire station (or similar services) for friends line, and yes LEGO would probably word their statements better, their commercials and I get some of the arguments about their previously failed lines that were directed at girls (though paradisa they really cannot complain about as they were trying to get girls to play with LEGO that were playing with Barbie at the time).

    In all, what is interesting is that the 5 last minutes they really get into good points that would have been better suited than wasting time with the first video and the first 8 minutes of the 2nd of which had a lot of inflammatory, dubious, and meaningless, statements IMO. The last 5 minutes is all they needed to post to be honest.

    Finally, (as sort of touched on in the last 5 minutes), you should buy your kids what they want, not what the stereotype says. Most kids do not see something as ' I should only want that or this' it is up to the parents to also ask their children what they want. Now if a parent says LEGO is a 'boys toy', well that is not LEGO's fault but a close minded parent.
    I get that LEGO can do more to gear its product to all, not just a segment of the populous, but the first part and most of the 2nd just seem to want to drive unnecessary.. outrage
    dougts
  • margotmargot Member Posts: 2,310

    Of course, I hear none of this about MB, or KREO either. So I guess it does signal one thing: LEGO is still on the top of the totem pole.

    Did MB or KREO used to have the perfect gender neutral toy that was marketed and played with by boys and girls, and then very deliberately stop marketing their product to girls, and then start a new line (or several) for girls that are pink, purple, hair salon, juice bar, cafe etc...? And Lego is just one example, she compared the ladyfig to Bratz dolls and others. Lego just makes the perfect example to talk about... the problem with gender marketing touches on almost all brands.


    As for the new ads vs old? Well I see that as an entirely different issue, not gender related, which is a prevalence of violence in our culture.

    Didn't Lego deliberately start marketing to boys only? That is absolutely gender related. They completely stopped marketing to girls....



    Finally, (as sort of touched on in the last 5 minutes), you should buy your kids what they want, not what the stereotype says. Most kids do not see something as ' I should only want that or this' it is up to the parents to also ask their children what they want.

    I think you have missed how much marketing has influenced the choices that we make... remember that pink used to be a boy's color? Most kids DO very quickly see things as "I should only want this...." They learn from their parents first, then from marketing.

  • ShibShib UKMember Posts: 5,331
    I'd say the biggest problems with the critical response in those videos are:

    1. The sales figures and success (and near complete failure) of TLG and what products have sold well or poorly

    2. Ignoring the effect of other toys shaping the market. The presenter seems to have no idea how close she comes to this when comparing the minidolls to Barbies and the action commercials to GI Joe.

    For TLG it's kind of a Kobayashi Maru situation. If they follow the market research and create a brand that will sell to girls they are accused of gender stereotyping, if they don't then the products won't sell well enough and will be little more than spending money to placate critics.

    While showing the historic marketing material shows that TLG have done some great cross gender marketing in the past I don't think it would work as well as the gender focused marketing, sad but that's the way the world is, not to say it can't change, but that it's the sort of change that takes time.

    The other thing I found slightly annoying was that the existing non friends detailed interior sets she chose to use as comparison to the Friends sets were all the high price range ones, and almost suggested if you want to buy a good set for the way girls play get them the Death Star.

    That aside it's interesting to see the focused advertising prsented like that, but the question I'd like to see answered with regards to that is, did TLG start focusing their advertising to boys in response to market trends or did the advertising cause market trends? Undeniable it might have furthered market trends but I think it would be hard to find the answer to which came first.
    dougts
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 9,782
    edited August 2014
    margot said:

    Of course, I hear none of this about MB, or KREO either. So I guess it does signal one thing: LEGO is still on the top of the totem pole.

    margot said:


    Did MB or KREO used to have the perfect gender neutral toy that was marketed and played with by boys and girls, and then very deliberately stop marketing their product to girls, and then start a new line (or several) for girls that are pink, purple, hair salon, juice bar, cafe etc...? And Lego is just one example, she compared the ladyfig to Bratz dolls and others. Lego just makes the perfect example to talk about... the problem with gender marketing touches on almost all brands.

    But I see those groups ALSO being gender biased. You cannot simply go '...but LEGO used to gender neutral, but now is not, so it is OK to slam them only....'


    As for the new ads vs old? Well I see that as an entirely different issue, not gender related, which is a prevalence of violence in our culture.

    margot said:

    Didn't Lego deliberately start marketing to boys only? That is absolutely gender related. They completely stopped marketing to girls....

    IMO the bigger issue is that the adverts are increasingly violent and I think a much bigger issue than 'boy vs girl', sorry if that offends anyone because last I checked girls can be violent too.


    Finally, (as sort of touched on in the last 5 minutes), you should buy your kids what they want, not what the stereotype says. Most kids do not see something as ' I should only want that or this' it is up to the parents to also ask their children what they want.

    margot said:


    I think you have missed how much marketing has influenced the choices that we make... remember that pink used to be a boy's color? Most kids DO very quickly see things as "I should only want this...." They learn from their parents first, then from marketing.

    I did not miss it. Like I said the last 5 minutes of part two touches on many parts (including that, which I did not add- as I figured people would watch the videos) and I get it, but it also falls on the parents to decide if they want to steer their kid a certain way, or let them get what they want. LEGO cannot go to every parents household with a LEGO city or Castle set and say 'you will give this to your daughter'. That is a much bigger issue that I think needs to be taken up with advertising agencies then and not just LEGO (which I believe is also said in the last 5 minutes of part 2). I'm sure there are girls that want guns and knives and cars and other 'boy' related toys, and I'm sure there parents buy those for them too, and probably regular LEGO sets as well (which the video seems to think all parents are geared to buy their boys LEGO regular sets, which i think is an insult to parents).
    But to try to say that parents cannot contribute to help equality is wrong IMO. I'm not saying parents are SOLELY responsible before someone gets the wrong idea, but parents are there to help guide their children in the start of life, and this is something parents also need to be made aware of. However, the videos could have done this with a 5 minute video and saved many people 20+ minutes.
  • cloaked7cloaked7 Member Posts: 1,448
    Back to the Research Institute set. It's currently listed as Sold Out on lego.com Does that mean it's now gone for good?
  • DadDad UKMember Posts: 815
    ^ I'm not sure what 'Sold Out' means anymore.....
    madforLEGOdougts
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 9,782
    cloaked7 said:

    Back to the Research Institute set. It's currently listed as Sold Out on lego.com Does that mean it's now gone for good?

    I would like to hope more of these appear BUT the Rover is 'sold out' and has not been replenished. What gives me hope though is it does not report as 'retired product' on [email protected] US yet
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,874
    edited August 2014
    margot said:


    Didn't Lego deliberately start marketing to boys only? That is absolutely gender related. They completely stopped marketing to girls....

    Well, not completely. But primarily. And the reason for that, of course, was their financial situation in the late 90s and early naughts. The LEGO Group was a company in crisis, and in order to recover they refocused their efforts on what had always been their most successful audience: young boys. But I'm sure that there were still girls on the focus groups for some themes, particularly LEGO Creator and City, and that the LEGO Group remained aware that even a theme for which boys were the primary audience could have cross-demographic appeal.

    Now that they have basically recovered and managed to become one of the most successful toy companies in the world, they were able to spend time and money researching what girls looked for in a toy, and how to get more girls interested in building toys in general and the LEGO brand in particular. LEGO Friends was the result of this research, and I think for the most part it's a good theme. It should never be the ONLY LEGO theme aimed at girls, nor should its success lead the LEGO Group to stop considering girls in the design of their other themes. Thankfully, the latter doesn't seem to have been the case — we're still seeing female representation in story-driven themes like LEGO Ninjago and LEGO Legends of Chima, albeit not as much as I feel there should be, and themes like LEGO Creator continue to maintain a balance between more traditionally "boyish" sets like trucks and planes and things like articulated animals and detailed houses that have helped the theme remain successful with girls.

    As for other specifically girl-oriented themes, I'm going to be patient, but I do think the LEGO Group is missing out if they're not yet working on an in-house fantasy theme targeted primarily at girls. Disney Princess, with its sanitized, domestic play scenarios and restrictive license, is not going to be enough on its own to compete with the likes of Monster High or My Little Pony. But LEGO Friends has done a good job demonstrating that it has the potential for all kinds of real-world scenarios, especially with the Jungle Animal Rescue subtheme that incorporates all kinds of action and adventure play that far surpasses any previous girl-oriented LEGO theme.

    I think over time, LEGO Friends might also result in more girls buying into other LEGO themes. Part of the reason such a girl-oriented theme was needed is that there was a bias among the general public that construction toys were a "boy's hobby". LEGO Friends broke down that barrier so effectively that plenty of copycat brands like Mega Bloks Barbie or Lite Brix have tried to cash in on a demographic that building toy companies had previously mostly ignored. And people stop treating the LEGO brand or the construction toy category as a boyish thing, then they'll be more willing to buy girls sets from other LEGO brands. Meanwhile, stores like Toys 'R' Us are beginning to reduce their emphasis on gendered marketing. In my local Toys 'R' Us, LEGO Friends is shelved with other LEGO sets, not with dolls, and while the purple packages still stand out from other LEGO themes, they are no longer surrounded by a flood of other pink and purple packages for unrelated brands. How long before other stores begin to follow suit?

    Some people have argued that the different minifigure design for LEGO Friends will discourage girls from buying other LEGO themes. I don't think that's nearly as big an issue as people make it out to be. I grew up on minifigure-based themes (my first set was #6665 River Runners), but I embraced Technic and BIONICLE sets despite those sets being pretty much completely incompatible as far as characters were concerned. There will definitely buy kids who buy ONLY Friends sets, the same as there would be for any theme, but I think there's still no shortage of room for crossover appeal even without a shared minifigure.
    LegoKip
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,098
    ^ You said My Little Pony...heh.
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,874
    mathew said:

    ^ You said My Little Pony...heh.

    So I did! Gasp, my not-so-secret identity as a brony has been discovered!
  • margotmargot Member Posts: 2,310
    Aanchir said:

    margot said:


    Didn't Lego deliberately start marketing to boys only? That is absolutely gender related. They completely stopped marketing to girls....

    Well, not completely. But primarily. And the reason for that, of course, was their financial situation in the late 90s and early naughts.
    If you watch the video it says that Lego has been intentionally designing, creating, and marketing exclusively to boys since at least the mid '80s. The Zack the Lego Maniac commercials are from the '80s.

  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,874
    margot said:

    Aanchir said:

    margot said:


    Didn't Lego deliberately start marketing to boys only? That is absolutely gender related. They completely stopped marketing to girls....

    Well, not completely. But primarily. And the reason for that, of course, was their financial situation in the late 90s and early naughts.
    If you watch the video it says that Lego has been intentionally designing, creating, and marketing exclusively to boys since at least the mid '80s. The Zack the Lego Maniac commercials are from the '80s.

    Really? I wouldn't know. The 80s were before my time. I grew up in the 90s and I know I remember a lot of themes being advertised with both boys AND girls (including in catalogs and LEGO Mania Magazines). As an example, here's the very first LEGO Mania Magazine cover, featuring a boy and a girl, and here's a 2001 LEGO Mindstorms ad from one of the Mania Magazines which featured both a boy and a girl. As the years went on, fewer and fewer parts of the LEGO Magazines featured human kids at all, but most of the sections and ads that did still featured both genders.

    The fact that there exist earlier ads that do feature boys exclusively doesn't surprise me, though. I think you could find ads (and set packaging) from even earlier that either only feature boys or only feature girls, depending on who the particular ad or package was targeting. That doesn't mean that the company as a whole was excluding girls from their advertising, though.
  • SamuraiPeteSamuraiPete Member Posts: 40
    I just spoke with a Lego store employee, so take with a grain of salt, but she said they were suppose to get another shipment of RI in mid November. Might make sense if Lego was making another production run just prior to Christmas.
  • margotmargot Member Posts: 2,310
    Aanchir said:

    here's a 2001 LEGO Mindstorms ad from one of the Mania Magazines which featured both a boy and a girl.

    Wow, did you look at that ad?!! Shows a few pictures of the boy building and programming the robot, and then using it at dinner... his sister has an open mouth of shock as the boy thinks "wait until she asks me to pass the butter". In what way is that marketing to girls?

  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,874
    edited August 2014
    margot said:

    Aanchir said:

    here's a 2001 LEGO Mindstorms ad from one of the Mania Magazines which featured both a boy and a girl.

    Wow, did you look at that ad?!! Shows a few pictures of the boy building and programming the robot, and then using it at dinner... his sister has an open mouth of shock as the boy thinks "wait until she asks me to pass the butter". In what way is that marketing to girls?
    You're right, it's probably not a great example. My bad. I chose it because, in the very least, it showed that girls can have an interest in LEGO Mindstorms... but you're right that if it doesn't show her actually playing with or using it it's more using her to show how boys can impress their friends/siblings.
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,409
    @Aanchir You mentioned My Little Pony and Barbie. These have been exclusively marketed to girls since their inception, yet there are many males who love and collect these toys. Why is Lego put under a different light. There's nothing stopping parents from buying toys that are marketed to boys? My daughter loves all Lego. She really loves Lego Superheroes. Spider-Man, The Flash and for some reason she likes Red Skull. I just had to buy her the new Captain America set because it has Red Skull. She doesn't like Wonder Woman. She loves her Friends and Princess Mini dolls too. I buy her whatever she likes and she doesn't let society tell her what she can or cannot like :)
    electrobovineLegoKipjuggles7
  • tamamahmtamamahm Member Posts: 1,963
    Aanchir, I agree with you longer post 100%, and have said much of this myself over the past year or two.
    Friends shouldn't be the only theme.
    It shouldn't mean Lego stops considering girls in their other themes.
    The part I would add on Princess.... it's the same issue with Cars. It targets a younger audience. That doesn't mean there won't be some older kids that like Princess or Cars, but both of these are younger demographics.
    I agree, there really needs to be some in-house fantasy, or they really are missing an opportunity, and I think such a set would scale a bit older than Friends might.
    I agree, Friends was needed, it broke barriers, that overall it was a positive thing. I also will add, I think it is one of the more creative lines as of late.

    The other part I will add is that when trying to track down a specific article a few weeks back I did read a few interesting things.
    - One article discussed about focus/market groups they did for Atlantis. Those focus groups were predominantly boys, but it did sound like they had the occasional girl. So, yes, it wasn't all boy, but yes, there there is a nice data point on one line that was more boy-focused.

    - Another article discussed something I had never heard. I had always heard repeated on this board that Star Wars saved Lego. What was interesting for me looking at a wired article and reading through the annual reports is that leading up to 2003 and up to 2007, is that it was far more complex than that. Harry Potter, which really is not simply just boy-focused played a good part in the few years leading up to 2003, and was one of the themes that made a positive contribution even in 2004, when Star Wars was not even mentioned in the annual report. The big issue was that both of these themes really took a hammering when there was not a movie out. In 2005 a Star Wars movie came out, while the HP movie did not hit until November, and then no movie until 2007. On the flip, Star Wars in 2007 was really called out as possibly a line that was making a transition to a classic line. For a while there, though, Harry Potter was a big deal for Lego during such a difficult time. Bionicle, though, was a huge part of their sales, and the return to classic lines was really their bread and butter. It really wasn't until 2006, that Lego finally saw that Star Wars did not have quite the huge drop back after a movie release, that they had seen multiple times before with both Star Wars and HP (Even then, their big sales in 2006 had to do with supplying stores product because they had low inventory on Lego in general, as opposed to simply a particular line.)
    Anyway, it was fascinating reading some of this, and not much of a point on that one but to say it was interesting seeing a line I would equate to more gender neutral sets playing such a role. I do have to wonder how many girls back then bought HP and how the numbers compared to the last release. I also had no idea Bionicle was such a big part back then either.
  • pharmjodpharmjod 1,170 miles to Wall Drug, USAMember Posts: 2,912
    @legomatt‌ standing O! Thank you. Also, I have seen the statement that it is a fairly recent convention that blue = boy and pink = girl and that as recently as the turn of the century pink was considered a masculine color. I'm not saying that it isn't true, but I have yet to see any documented source that validates this, especially regarding here in the USA. I am beginning to wonder if this is a convenient fiction concocted to support one side of the discussion. I'm sure it is entirely possible to be a true statement, I would just like to see some reliable source confirm it.
  • TheBrickLaddTheBrickLadd Chippenham, Wilts, UK.Member Posts: 844
    Update on my order placed on the 21st August.

    Lego shipped out a free Mini for spending over £50. That arrived today. So if they cancel the order due to unavailability then I have been given that for free. So heres hoping they send out the order.
  • TheBrokenPlateTheBrokenPlate Member Posts: 28
    Just noticed that it's available to backorder now (ship Oct 8th) at Lego [email protected] EU.
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