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A child's MOC of TLM... just a father's thoughs

Maybe it's just parent's pride, but I came back home late last night, so I couldn's see my son. This morning he wanted to show me something he did yesterday, and... well, here's the picture:

image

I've been reading here that children is nowadays just following the intructions booklet and not interested in creating. After we opened his lastest set (#31007) he didn't want to build the model, but rather he spent one hour building random stuff with the set bricks.

OK what I mean is... well, I don't really know... I think I've been teaching him how to build and maybe I've should have listened to what he could teach me. I feel this figures are so damn great! We might just let ourselves be taught sometimes!
TLM.jpg 33.9K
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Comments

  • TechnicNickTechnicNick Berkshire, UKMember Posts: 279
    I don't think you can be 'taught' to build. You're either creative or you're not. Your son plainly is.
  • rancorbaitrancorbait Manitoba CanadaMember Posts: 1,850
    You can indeed be taught to build. There are many different techniques and methods of building, I have learned much myself from studying other's MOC's, so you can certainly be taught to build! Creativity and skill are two different things :o)
  • luckie_reubsluckie_reubs Member Posts: 299
    That's really cool. I tend to follow directions, and that's what I've done my whole life. I was so proud of my daughter for "following directions" when she built her Cuckoo Palace, but now they ask, "Is this right, Daddy?" I've got to back up and tell them, "They're Lego blocks; you can't do it wrong!" to see what they can come up with.

    What your son did is really cool and kind of captures the essence of what, I assume, Lego was all about from the beginning.
  • UnixpaceUnixpace Member Posts: 12
    ^I feel like you said, @luckie_reubs‌: "you can't do it wrong!". I feel some brick sculptures and abstract works really capture this: what's in your mind, how you see things, and not just an scaled model. (As much as I like realistic MOCs!)

    I love Picasso's The Young Ladies of Avignon since I was a kid, so maybe that's just what's in my mind: cubes. ;-)
  • Bluefairy_56Bluefairy_56 Member Posts: 320
    I also love that a child's mind seems to be more creative than us adults, we see things as they are, they see things as they should be to them.

    This is why my crate of Lego for the visiting grandkids to play has no sets, no instructions, but full of basic Lego to create whatever they want to make.

    Imagination is a very powerful tool, that sometimes we loose as we grow up.
  • BMannAFOLBMannAFOL Member Posts: 2
    My son likes to do both but he seems to get more excited about what he creates. We've talked a bunch about why Lord Business wanted everything to be done by directions and how master builders use thier brains to build. He likes hearing its ok to build what you want.
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,913
    BMannAFOL said:

    My son likes to do both but he seems to get more excited about what he creates. We've talked a bunch about why Lord Business wanted everything to be done by directions and how master builders use thier brains to build. He likes hearing its ok to build what you want.

    Yeah, I think the message of the LEGO Movie, more than anything else, is that there's no one right way to build. This doesn't just apply to building from the instructions vs. building from you're imagination. Lord Business and (another important, more spoilery character) both criticized a lot of the creations in the movie for being "weird" or "not making sense". But when we impose our values of what does or doesn't make sense on other people, we close ourselves off from understanding and learning from their way of seeing things.

    I'm all for constraints in building, and I often build within very rigid constraints. But they are mainly constraints I set for myself. It's my way of challenging myself as a builder. I think every builder should learn to be true to their own creative impulses rather than think they have to build everything to other people's specifications. Even the ones that are inspired by the official sets, such as "minifig scale".
  • mnbvcmnbvc Member Posts: 136
    I work with children, and seeing them build with Lego is fantastically rewarding.

    I didn't really build creatively with Lego when I was younger, as I didn't have enough bricks. We had some very small sets (even the ones I thought were big!) and some had very large, specialist pieces which weren't conducive to building MOCs.

    I work in a fairly deprived area, and I know there are lots of children who are in similar circumstances - they don't have access to lots of bricks, so it's wonderful to give them an opportunity to build with thousands of bricks, all of different shapes and colours.

    I always think that Lego is a little bit like drawing. When you're a child, you draw and colour a lot to express yourself and you do the best job that you can. As you get older, you realise that you're either a talented artist, or you're not...and if you're not, you tend to give up because the drawings that you did that were acceptable (or good) at 8 aren't very impressive at 28.

    Similarly with Lego, most adult builders are aiming for a realistic representation - so if you build a Wild Western town, you're going to need brown floorboards and saloon doors, and a brick built piano... But when you ask kids to build a Wild Western town, they still manage to get across an interpretation of a Wild Western town - they just do it in their own way (and usually with a crazy hotchpotch of colours and oddly arranged bricks).

    I really like discussing builds with children. Sometimes you can be really confused about what a build is supposed to be, but as soon as they start explaining all of the features, you're suddenly transported to their world and you start to see it through their eyes. Not only can you make sense of what they've built, you start to understand why they've made the choices they have - and that's awesome.
    Aanchir
  • ShibShib UKMember Posts: 5,410
    One of the funny things with the movie is seeing Benny reminded me of myself as a child. Me and my brother almost exclusively built spaceships. When I got back into Lego as an adult I've only really been building by instructions, after the movie I have been playing about a bit more. Wish I had more room for Lego, maybe one day I'll have a bug enough place to have a lego room.
  • KirstyL21KirstyL21 South AfricaMember Posts: 27
    In my youth we had limited access to LEGO themed sets. My cousins had a giant box with a few mini-figure parts. We had no option but to create our own builds. If we wanted horses we had to build them. When I got back into LEGO I bought Creator houses and still build them to the instructions. More recently with the purchase of the Mixels I have delved back into random creative builds and I had forgotten how much fun and challenging it can be. My nephew is coming to visit in October and I am planning a great LEGO fest and am gearing up for MOC's or should I say OOC (our own creations) - I am dying to see what he comes up with.
  • BrickarmorBrickarmor USAMember Posts: 1,257

    I also love that a child's mind seems to be more creative than us adults, we see things as they are, they see things as they should be to them.

    mnbvc said:


    I really like discussing builds with children. Sometimes you can be really confused about what a build is supposed to be, but as soon as they start explaining all of the features, you're suddenly transported to their world and you start to see it through their eyes. Not only can you make sense of what they've built, you start to understand why they've made the choices they have - and that's awesome.

    Yes and yes! Time and again I see this with my son (8). Two examples:

    He built a bathroom once and was identifying everything for me and just talking about it. He finished, so I asked him about the seemingly random silver grill on the floor. He patiently replied, "That's the air conditioning vent."

    He built a winter scene once, using white dots as snowballs and lots of white plates as the base. But wherever someone was standing with a snowball he used a white Technic plate with holes in it to show where they scooped up the snow. I guess both examples stand out to me because I could not see the reason until he explained it to me, then it made perfect sense. I actually felt like I'd leanred the simple secret to a magic trick!
    plasmodiummnbvc
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