LEGO Pricing Becoming Prohibitive to Collecting?

VaderXVaderX Member Posts: 220
edited February 2014 in Collecting
So after watching The Brick Show's NYTF videos I was really disappointed with the new MSRP on most of the sets. I have not made a lot of Lego purchases in the last six months due to lack of discounts. If the pricing trend continues I can see myself exiting the hobby. Does anyone else feel this way? Thoughts?
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Comments

  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,096
    We saw heavy discounting on non exclusive sets last year. We will probably see similar discounts this year. It would be interesting to see how well a set like the Sea Cow does. It's exclusive and tied to a hit movie but it's also very expensive.
    FollowsCloselydougts
  • VaderXVaderX Member Posts: 220
    The Sea Cow was one of the sets i actually liked, then I saw the MSRP and I thought holy s*&^ 250.00$? Never mind!
  • y2joshy2josh Member Posts: 2,002
    The Sea Cow is actually the one LEGO Movie set I really wanted to purchase, but knowing I'll never be able to get it for a reasonable price (at least as it stands now) is the single reason I'm not planning on picking it up.
    VaderX
  • tamamahmtamamahm Member Posts: 1,950
    I have a stash of Lego for me son still, and there is not much out this year that he has interest in. It really has been a disappointing year for themes.because of that the price changes are not impacting us much yet. Right now Mixels and the Friends Penguin pack are the items he want.
    dougts
  • BastaBasta Australia Member Posts: 1,259
    $389.99 ($354USD) is supposedly the Australian retail price. Assuming all things continue as they currently do with regards to discounting in Australia, we should be able to pick this up on sale for about $280 ($253.50USD).
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,788
    It depends what you buy. There have been significant discounts on non-exclusive items, as noted above. With The Lego Movie dominating the output this year so far, if you are not into that (like me), then it will be a relatively cheap year anyway.
    dougts
  • FollowsCloselyFollowsClosely Member Posts: 949
    edited February 2014
    Price per piece the Sea Cow #70810 is the best priced boat that Lego has ever release! Just look at the $/piece for past few boats and find a better example to moan and complain about.

    #70810 MetalBeard's Sea Cow - Price per piece: 6.202p / 9.120c
    #10210 Imperial Flagship - Price per piece: 8.593p / 10.817c
    #6243 Brickbeard's Bounty - Price per piece: 10.133p / 16.890c
    #4195 Queen Anne's Revenge - Price per piece: 9.414p / 10.968c
    #4184 The Black Pearl - Price per piece: 10.571p / 12.437c

    I you want to discuss "Prohibitive to Collecting" I think the large number of great sets produced over the past few years is a much larger factor.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,788
    ^ Yes, lego has clearly learnt that if they increase the number of small parts they can get away with price increases as the price per part ratio still looks good . Also removing cloth sails and replacing them with plastic panels instead (especially as that will massively increase the count of technic pins), cutting numbers of minifigures, etc.
    binaryeyepharmjoddougtsmadforLEGOTheBigLegoskiVaderXFoxyA19
  • AleyditaAleydita BelgiumMember Posts: 794
    Yes, there's always the danger that the obsession of 'price per piece' would see TLG try and maximise on this by including more smaller parts. Obviously we don't know if that's what's happening but I often wonder why, for example, they include 20-odd 1x2 tiles when 5 1x6 tiles would do the exact same job.
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,096
    y2josh said:

    The Sea Cow is actually the one LEGO Movie set I really wanted to purchase, but knowing I'll never be able to get it for a reasonable price (at least as it stands now) is the single reason I'm not planning on picking it up.

    If I really, really wanted a set and had the funds then I wouldn't let saving $50-75 keep me from purchasing.

    Actually aside from UCS the recent Exclusives have been priced fairly according to their price per part.
    PaperballparkFollowsCloselyAanchirtiminchicago
  • timinchicagotiminchicago USAMember Posts: 239
    I think that #10243 PR with 2469 pieces is a good example of larger piece count justifying increased RRP mainly augmented with smaller pieces.
    dougts
  • PaperballparkPaperballpark UKMember Posts: 3,448
    Ok I'm sick of this. People always complain that Lego is too expensive for them. Fine, if it is, don't buy it!

    "But I want it and they've made it too expensive for me to afford" is the reply I'm expecting to hear to that. Well, I want a 5 bedroom house with a 4 acre garden in the middle of the country, but that would be too expensive for me to afford, so I don't buy one, and you don't hear me complaining about it or blaming the owners for setting the price too high.

    I might just be in a "can't be bothered" mood at the moment, but I'm starting to get sick of people moaning about the 'increasing price of Lego', apparently unaware that there is such a thing as inflation.

    If you really want it so much, find an evening or weekend job to supplement your income, then you'll be able to afford it.

    Rant over.
    FollowsCloselyAanchirBrick_ObsessionFurrysaurusiancam33FoxyA19Lego91Wicksy80
  • FollowsCloselyFollowsClosely Member Posts: 949
    ^ No keep going. It's what I wanted to say, but lacked the energy to type :) Lego is expensive, but this set is not a good example to make your point on.
  • graphitegraphite USMember Posts: 3,241
    Aleydita said:

    but I often wonder why, for example, they include 20-odd 1x2 tiles when 5 1x6 tiles would do the exact same job.

    I'm pretty sure this comes down to how they handle piece manufacturing. If they aren't currently making that 1x6 for another set but they are making 1x2's for multiple other sets then they're going to use what is already in production. You'll also see them use a weird color of a part that isn't going to be seen when you'd be like "why isn't this part just grey like the rest of the parts" but there is always a reason.
    Oldfan
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,788
    ^ It is a bad example if price per part is the only statistic you want to use to define value.
    VaderX
  • PaperbackwriterPaperbackwriter Member Posts: 105
    The vast majority of lego sets are under $100. As for me, I want the mega piece count sets that cost over $200. I want something that takes a little more time and effort. If anything, I think Lego has neglected the upper end of the price range.
    dougts
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,803
    I think it really depends on your perspective on "collecting". How do you define a "complete" collection?

    Part of the reason I no longer collect licensed themes is that I know it is prohibitively expensive to meet my own personal standard for "completion" in these themes. There are so many beautiful Star Wars sets today which put my 1999-2005 collection to shame. But I know that no matter how many Star Wars sets I get, there will be sets and figures "missing" from some of the franchise's most iconic scenes. The epic scale of the source material makes recreating its cast of characters and its range of ships incredibly expensive to do, even if you just focus on the most memorable scenes.

    In themes like Ninjago, my standard for completion tends to be to get all the main character minifigures with few duplicates, plus a certain selection of models. In 2011, I wanted to ensure I got all the Ninja minifigures and all the dragons (I ended up getting all the skeleton minifigures too, but didn't really bother with the skeleton vehicles unless they got me figs I was missing and had good value for money). In 2012, my emphasis was on getting all five ZX Ninja, all four NRG Ninja, all four of their elemental vehicles, and Epic Dragon Battle. But I skipped most of the spinner sets and a number of other sets — I didn't put forward a concerted effort to get all 17 Serpentine minifigures. All in all, I still end up getting a lot of sets, but I don't shed any tears over the sets I miss, because they're usually ones I know I can do without. I also try to schedule the majority of my purchases to take advantage of sales and deals, so that cuts down on the overall cost.

    And in some themes where I'm not invested in the story, I have an even looser definition of "completion". For instance, I plan to get the Legend Beasts from this year's Legends of Chima theme, which I love, but I don't care too much about getting any of the larger playsets. And I buy the CMFs as impulse purchases, not with any goal of completing a collection. I used to get reasonably complete collections back when I was in college and had to go shopping frequently. Nowadays, I tend to get only a few from any given series.
  • FollowsCloselyFollowsClosely Member Posts: 949
    CCC said:

    ^ It is a bad example if price per part is the only statistic you want to use to define value.

    But it is the easiest to gather :) And in this case valid as there are lots and lots of large pieces in this set and the volume or weight is not yet available.

    #70810 MetalBeard's Sea Cow - ?g
    #10210 Imperial Flagship - 2590g
    #6243 Brickbeard's Bounty - 1801g
    #4195 Queen Anne's Revenge - 1991g
    #4184 The Black Pearl - 1748g

    Bottom line, this set is priced consistent with other boats produced over the past few years and in Lego terms is a good value. I actually expected this to be $270-$280.
  • wagnerml2wagnerml2 Belleville, IllinoisMember Posts: 1,376
    @paperballpark and @followsclosely - I agree with you both for the most part, however, there is always the phenomena that occurs as a brand becomes more popular, the price point continues to rise because the market will bear it and that the increase in price off-sets the consumers who drop out at the higher price point. I think some people get mad when it looks like Lego is trying to profit-take in part based on the rising popularity of the brand.
  • Brewer51Brewer51 Member Posts: 248
    I


    I you want to discuss "Prohibitive to Collecting" I think the large number of great sets produced over the past few years is a much larger factor.

    Hits the nail on the head for me. It's not that it's too expensive (there are few Lego sets that I've come across that were truly 'overpriced') but that the 'bigger' sets are being released with more frequency.
  • dougtsdougts Oregon, USAMember Posts: 4,128
    edited February 2014
    For me I'm starting to realize I have spent the past few years buying LEGO sets just to buy LEGO sets. The number of sets that I buy that I actually love and want to keep as sets is but a fraction of my purchases. Honestly, in any given year there are probably 10-15 actual sets that I think are good enough for me to want to buy and keep. Yet I've bought many many times that amount each year. Most have been converted to my parts collection, so it's not a complete waste, but I've certainly found that as far as set collecting goes, I can stand to be a lot choosier with my selections.

    2014 has been good so far, in part due to this self-realization, but perhaps moreso due to the fact that the themes and sets offerred thus far has been the absolute worst in years (in terms of their appeal to me personally), outside of a couple of gems of course.
    YellowcastlemargotLegoboyRainstorm26
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,788

    CCC said:

    ^ It is a bad example if price per part is the only statistic you want to use to define value.

    But it is the easiest to gather :) And in this case valid as there are lots and lots of large pieces in this set and the volume or weight is not yet available.

    #70810 MetalBeard's Sea Cow - ?g
    #10210 Imperial Flagship - 2590g
    #6243 Brickbeard's Bounty - 1801g
    #4195 Queen Anne's Revenge - 1991g
    #4184 The Black Pearl - 1748g

    Bottom line, this set is priced consistent with other boats produced over the past few years and in Lego terms is a good value. I actually expected this to be $270-$280.
    It is easy to gather. For me one of the better indicators of value is how long to build followed by how long do I want to display it for. Unfortunately those data are not so easy to gather. Although I can often get a good idea of both by reading the manual before purchasing.

    If reduced to just numbers of pieces, it is worth noting number of 1x1 rounds and technic pins and for every 100 remove £1 from the cost, as for both parts I typically pay 1p on bricklink. That often gives a different picture. Same for small cheese slopes.

    And it's nor that I am against small details, I love it. Ot is just that those parts are not 10p per piece parts.
    pharmjodVaderX
  • PaperballparkPaperballpark UKMember Posts: 3,448
    To be clear, I wasn't having a go at the OP specifically, but rather a general go at the people on here who moan.
  • YellowcastleYellowcastle Member Posts: 4,401
    ^ Right now, that would be masochistic. ;o)
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO Chicagoland USMember Posts: 9,349
    People asked for this IMO.
    People always want new parts to make their LEGO look 'realistic' and with different colors. That price comes at a cost.
    How many tiny pieces are used in sets nowadays whereas before you would have had less part counts in sets 10 years older where the part and color palette was less.

    I'd rather have a bit less detail and have my LEGO cost me less, but that is just my theory on this (and full disclosure, I am a child of the 80's where we did not have 3000 part types and colors).
    Plus you have inflation, both imagined (LEGO overcharging -IMO- on licensed themes) and real (cost of the materials as oil is not going to go down in price)

    Finally the imagined inflation otherwise known as LEGO's blatant money grab on licensed sets, but again people are going to buy at those prices then LEGO will do it. Same reason why TRU has obnoxious RRP on their LEGO. People keep paying.
    To be clear, I have no problem with LEGO having to charge more for SW or other licenses, as it is licensed and they have to butter Lucas, now Disney's, bread so to speak. But I have notice that prices are going up with the sets seemingly getting smaller, which is not cool.

    The best way to get LEGO to lower their prices is do not buy it. Most times companies only get the idea when their pocketbook takes a hit, Or wait for it to go on sale.
    Sure Exclusives do not count to this discount (at least in the US) but then do not buy it and miss out on the set.
    FollowsCloselySuperTrampdougtsLegoboymrbigz1226
  • ACWWGal2011ACWWGal2011 Member Posts: 534
    Yes, lego has clearly learnt that if they increase the number of small parts they can get away with price increases as the price per part ratio still looks good . Also removing cloth sails and replacing them with plastic panels instead (especially as that will massively increase the count of technic pins), cutting numbers of minifigures, etc.
    I hate sets that have too many itty bitty studs and cheese slopes and those are actually a turnoff for me. I must have at least 300 each of those things in my collection. I'll admit that they look really cool in storage containers but I rarely use the things in quantities greater then about 4 each in mocs. If you like those things, have fun, I have nothing against you but they aren't my thing

    and when it comes to cloth vs panel sails, I think it depends on the case. If the sets meant to have sails set up like the ship is sailing, then cloth looks fine, but if it's supposed to be sails folded, I think panels look better.

    And minifigures are defiantly a matter of opinion. I'd rather have only 1 or 2 figs a set and more parts in the set then more figs. Including parts, I think I have something like 400 figures plus spare parts.
    Kanohi
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,788
    I'm a child of the 70s, growing up with a bucket of mainly red 2x4s and a pile of wheels. I love tiny modern parts for details. I don't love paying 10p per part though, not for pieces that size.
  • PaperbackwriterPaperbackwriter Member Posts: 105
    While I cant claim credit for this opinion, I agree with it: '70810 is a child's set with an adult price tag.' It really looks well designed and I hope those who want it can figure out a way to afford it.
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,096
    edited February 2014
    Today's sets are definitely more brick heavy than years past. One reason is for extra detail. But also to make sets more sturdy for playing. Like others have said, some sets use a wide variety of specialized parts so that makes them more expensive to manufacture. The Sea Cow for example looks to use parts from just about every theme. Creator sets tend to use off the shelf parts which is why they are cheaper.

    I think the most overpriced theme in 2014 is City. A 250 piece set shouldn't cost $50. The Star Wars sets look fairly priced in comparison. Especially when you take in consideration the license. Take for example the new AT-AT: At 1,137 pieces I would have expected it to be $130. But at $110 it's less than .10 Pp. Amazon and others will probably have it at $80 during the run-up to the holidays.
  • y2joshy2josh Member Posts: 2,002
    mathew said:

    y2josh said:

    The Sea Cow is actually the one LEGO Movie set I really wanted to purchase, but knowing I'll never be able to get it for a reasonable price (at least as it stands now) is the single reason I'm not planning on picking it up.

    If I really, really wanted a set and had the funds then I wouldn't let saving $50-75 keep me from purchasing.
    Ah. I follow. I wasn't using 'really' as an intensifier so much as I was using it in place of 'actually.' To be clearer, The Sea Cow is the only set I have an interest in in a theme that doesn't really interest me at all, but it's not interesting enough (to me) to justify $250.

    That said, it may be fairly priced, but I don't subscribe to the price-per-piece model, for the exact reasons stated by others above. To be fair, it looks like it's probably quite a bit heavier than the Imperial Flagship, but I obviously don't have any data to support that.
    VaderX
  • PaperballparkPaperballpark UKMember Posts: 3,448
    Possibly slightly off-topic, but my uncle was asking my mum the other day where he could buy boxes of Lego bricks that were all the same style and colour.

    My mum said they didn't sell them like that anymore. My uncle apparently mumbled and grumbled about this, wondering why not, as he hated how they're sold these days (lots of different pieces in sets with instructions).

    My mum tried to explain the concept of PAB walls to him, but he couldn't quite grasp it.

    My uncle is nearing 70. He and my mum played with Lego back in the early 60s. I think my uncle wanted the world of construction toys to have stayed still in the intervening 50 years...
  • monkeyhangermonkeyhanger Member Posts: 2,835
    70810 is a great looking set, after seeing one in the flesh at the Lego store tonight, it looks very good value for money (on a full RRP basis, compared to other full RRP sets) - had a look at the box too, quite a heavy lump, appears to be a good 2.5Kg.

    Nice to see a favourable exchange rate too for once: £170:$250 - far better value for the UK than the Simpsons House (£180:$200) and not a million miles off true exchange rate. I wonder why TLG can release 2 comparable sized sets within 2 months of each other, with no currency swing in that time, and see such a huge difference. Another example of selling for what each market will bear?

    Have your limit for any set and move on if it is too much. There are some sets i'd buy at RRP without much persuasion and others i'd only touch at 40% off.
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,096
    ^ That's why I wonder if the Sea Cow will sell well. It's appeal will be limited to those who are huge fans of the movie and or Steampunk. Pirate fans may be turned off by the technic panel sails, lack of authenticity and general weirdness of it. It very will could be a short lived set if initial sales are slow.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,788
    You can still buy bulk packs of roof slopes and wheels. I'd love them to do boxes of 1x4s etc in a single colour, maybe 200 in a box. But bricks for creativity don't seem to sell so well, and are possibly seen as one and done. Whereas keep bringing out new models, each with a new or rare part you need to build that model and people will keep buying.

  • PaperballparkPaperballpark UKMember Posts: 3,448
    @CCC I think they discontinued both bulk packs. My uncle was basically meaning bulk packs of 2x4 bricks.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,788
    Have they? I haven't checked for a while. And I guess that is the problem. Once you have a few hundred in red, you never need to buy them again.
  • Brewer51Brewer51 Member Posts: 248
    edited February 2014
    @monkeyhanger is it quite sizable? Id imagine it looks rather impressive in the flesh.

    (Or should that be 'in the brick'...)
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,803
    mathew said:

    ^ That's why I wonder if the Sea Cow will sell well. It's appeal will be limited to those who are huge fans of the movie and or Steampunk. Pirate fans may be turned off by the technic panel sails, lack of authenticity and general weirdness of it. It very will could be a short lived set if initial sales are slow.

    If the LEGO Group's product line over the years is any indication, traditional Pirate fans are hardly a demographic that they intend to rely on. Pirates has been the least consistently available category among the LEGO Group's "evergreen themes".

    And even if the recent lack of Pirates sets has anything to do with the terms of the PotC licensing agreement, I am incredibly skeptical of whether the LEGO Group would have entered into such a restrictive licensing agreement if they saw a lot of money to be made from non-licensed Pirates sets. Certainly they haven't let their licensing agreements for LotR and SW restrict them from releasing Castle or Space sets, even if non-licensed Space sets did go on hiatus for many years in the early naughts as a deliberate business decision — not as a term of any licensing contract.

    And finally, if the success of themes like Ninjago are any indication, the younger crowd are not sticklers for historical accuracy. They like wacky, playful sets that tell them stories that they haven't heard before in historical movies and history books. An awesome futuristic pirate ship will probably be incredibly popular among TFOLs, and its steampunk stylings will probably help boost its popularity within the AFOL community, which I imagine tends to skew slightly nerdier than typical parents.

    If anything stands to present sales problems for the Sea Cow, it's that the ship is not incredibly prominent in marketing materials for the LEGO Movie, and that there are not as many scenes on board the ship as there are in, say, Lord Business's Evil Lair. But I still think that LEGO Movie fans (who are, we can assume based on the movie's popularity, an ENORMOUS demographic) will find this set incredibly desirable.
    FollowsClosely
  • monkeyhangermonkeyhanger Member Posts: 2,835
    Yes, it was very tall in the window, and looked quite solid. It seemed to be very good value in a full RRP environment compared to most other sets.
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,374
    edited February 2014

    To be clear, I wasn't having a go at the OP specifically, but rather a general go at the people on here who moan.

    ^ Right now, that would be masochistic. ;o)

    I wouldn't be fun for me if people didn't moan while I was having a go at them ;)

    pharmjod
  • jcurrencejcurrence Member Posts: 8
    I get inflation, but I was surprised at how few sets in The Lego Movie series were in what I consider "Birthday party" budget. They have 2 at $12.99, 1 at $19.99, 5 at $29.99, 1 at $34.99, 1 at $39.99, 1 at $49.99, 2 at $69.99, and of course the Sea Cow at $249.99. Unless people are expected to spent $30 on birthday party presents these days?
  • mathewmathew Member Posts: 2,096
    edited February 2014
    legogal said:


    A friend of mine has made a point of buying few LEGO sets but building some amazing smaller MOC's. He makes the most of his small collection of anyone I know, and seems quite happy with his approach. He is setting a great example for his child of how to enjoy what you have and not worry about what you might have bought.

    I am trying this. MOCing is the best way to get your money's worth out of this hobby. It also requires some investment however. I have spent $50 just on misc. brick orders for one small project. That and it requires skill to be good at MOCs. I'm not great at them but I do feel much more fulfilled vs. following the instructions. You just cant be upset if your creation looks like a 8 year old built it.
    timinchicago
  • Pitfall69Pitfall69 0 miles to Legoboy's houseMember Posts: 11,374
    Coincidentally, a few of my friends and I were having the same conversation about Lego being expensive. It was my daughters birthday, so we were just discussing toys in general.

    I always seem to use automobiles to make a point, so I guess I will again :-) Lego IS more expensive than your average toy, but there are other toys that are even more expensive, like Power Wheels. Everything seems to get more expensive every year and Lego is no exception. Not everyone can afford a Lamborghini or Ferrari, but there are plenty of cars we can choose from to fit our budget. I remember my first new car I bought with my own money. I wanted all the bells and whistles, but the payment didn't fit my budget, so I got a second job to afford the payment and get the car of my dreams.

    If Lego is really important to you, maybe you can find a way to afford the Lego sets you want to buy. I certainly have to plan in order to buy the sets I want, especially with 2 children, but the price point will never keep me from buying Lego :-)
    Yellowcastlepharmjod
  • ACWWGal2011ACWWGal2011 Member Posts: 534
    edited February 2014
    jcurrence said:

    I get inflation, but I was surprised at how few sets in The Lego Movie series were in what I consider "Birthday party" budget. They have 2 at $12.99, 1 at $19.99, 5 at $29.99, 1 at $34.99, 1 at $39.99, 1 at $49.99, 2 at $69.99, and of course the Sea Cow at $249.99. Unless people are expected to spent $30 on birthday party presents these days?

    I was thinking about the prices also. mostly from a "bang for my buck" issue. My per set budget is maybe 20 dollars since the bigger sets that I purchase on sale on the very rare occasion seem to be a bit lacking. I get that it takes money for packaging and shipping and stuff, but this is a little ridiculous and I couldn't see myself paying full price on them.

    Sure I could save up for other sets, but judging by the 2 sets in my budget that I got plus the fact that I didn't even like the movie, I'm not planning on anymore TLM buying unless there's a good sale(I like a good parts pack or interesting set that's clearance)

    the melting room is too small a scene for the price tag. Maybe as 10 buck set, but not as a 13 buck set

    And TBH, the CCP is pushing it. I think it might be a "saved by the cool parts and unikitty" case for me.
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 17,788
    legogal said:


    There are so many choices of sets and themes that it is easy to end up buying sets that don't really interest you. It requires a lot of focus and self-discipline to select the sets that are most likely to please you in the long run. Usually we don't know what a set really looks like when built. Or how we will feel once we have built it. We must make our selection decisions based on many other assumptions, such as how much the price and availability will vary over time.

    There is a lot of information on the web now. I don't normally think too much before buying a cheap set. But before I buy and expensive one, I always download the instructions and read through them to see if I will enjoy the build. Sometimes I might do that for 2-3 hours. I will read reviews, I will look at photos of the minifigs, I will watch numerous reviews on youtube, I will examine many photos of it online, I might even watch stop frame videos of the build. I might even get the parts for it from my MOC kit and build part or all of it from existing bricks, even if in the wrong colours. If I still like it, it will go on a wants list and I will watch the price especially if there is likely to be a sale / offer coming up.
    VaderXvitreolum
  • OldfanOldfan Chicagoland, IL, USAMember Posts: 621
    LEGO set collecting has always been an expensive hobby, and until I exit the hobby it's only going to get worse. I've had some success lately waiting for discounts and sales. My strategy is to prioritize the themes I absolutely must have, stick to the strict budget I've set for myself, and take advantage of any rebates, reward points, etc. to ease the pain whenever possible.

    It's a far greater challenge to deal with my wife's "disapproval" of the hobby than to deal with the cost...
    pharmjodRainstorm26
  • VaderXVaderX Member Posts: 220
    I find it amusing that people quickly run to the excuse of "if you can't afford it find a way or don't buy it then." I can assure you my Lego habits has nothing to do with lack of money.

    Last year I nearly brought home 100k, after taxes. I live in a state that has an average family income of 45k. I have a modest mortgage payment, both my cars are paid off. I have zero debt other than my mortgage and living costs on a monthly basis. Odds are my situation in life is far more comfortable than most.

    By no means am I trying to brag or boast. I generally work 60+ hours a week and have a part time employee. I've worked extremely hard to get to this point in my life. I'm 29 years old and single. My "budget" for "toys" is probably higher in a year than most people make in a year.

    My concern is that Lego has inflated on a higher % basis than most other products have. A barrel of oil is still 20% cheaper than it was before the crash of 2008. I'm sure TLG is pushing the envelope to see just how far people will go before they walk away from the brand. It's a common practice to raise prices when business is booming.

    The price per set ratio most people use to perceive a 'value' is meaningless to me when 20% of a set is tiny little 1x1's. 1x1's are not worth 10c per part. If this makes you happy, great. The question I asked had nothing to do with moaning. I simple wanted to know if others had seen a diminishing value in the Lego brand in the last two years. Specifically in 2014 sets.

    Perhaps I should have asked a more specific question originally. Price per weight in stead of price per part or MSRP.

    Thanks to all who responded to my original question.

    :)
    dougtsTheBigLegoskihewmanpharmjodoldtodd33
  • iancam33iancam33 Member Posts: 407
    I agree with Mathew about city being overpriced. That range is the worst IMO(but that is neither here-nor-there. Followsclosely definitely hit the mark that there are too many great sets to purchase which is a great thing on the same token. As far as cost respective to LEGO a lot of it "comes out in the wash" so-to-speak. Yes, some sets have high piece counts but give you tiny pieces so the number looks inflated but on the other side of that those sets come with very specialized and unique pieces which offsets the smaller, cheaper pieces. Another note to consider which most don't think about is the time and effort that goes into designing the set. Not every set can be thought of, created/designed and put into production in two shakes of a lambs tail. This has to be accounted for. Think of all the hours TLG pays to have their workers think of all these things and make it work in the end. I'm sure it's a crap-ton of hours. Yes, there are sets that they might design in a heartbeat, ie: the city sets, and so if we were to take true cost of the parts and labor etc for every set it might be that a typical city set should actually cost $5-10 and a set like the SeaCow would actually cost $500. So they lower one price and raise the other price to make things a little more respectable. I could be talking out my ass but unless you own a business you don't truly know what goes on behind the scenes to stay in business, make a decent profit to have a worthwhile business while not pissing people off too much because of their ignorance. My two cents.
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